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  #961  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2019, 3:58 PM
s211 s211 is offline
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Originally Posted by SpongeG View Post
I filled up at 95.9 in GP today at Costco. Most places were 99.9 - 106.9
Bbbbbbbbut Gas Buddy says that in Edmonton it's 87.9 at Costco and 83.9 at Co-op!!! You're still getting ripped off by big oil!
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  #962  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2019, 6:56 PM
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SpongeG SpongeG is offline
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its 116.9 up in northern alberta still
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  #963  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2019, 3:25 AM
WestCoastEcho WestCoastEcho is offline
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Originally Posted by MalcolmTucker View Post
In all markets with fungible goods - otherwise there is an arbitrage opportunity and the market will clear and settle at the marginal price. There is no reason to leave money on the table.
Correct.

And don't think that even if they sell into the Lower Mainland at a lower price, the opposite could occur; if a Lower Mainland wholesaler sells at $0.99 a litre, but Washington State wholesalers are selling at an equivalent of $1.19 a litre, what's stopping a Washington State buyer from noticing and snapping up supply from the Lower Mainland wholesaler?

No laws to prevent that; all you need is either empty trucks, barges, or train cars to load up in the Lower Mainland and head south with the fuel. And there's no legal way to stop it too, due to various free trade agreements and the WTO.
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  #964  
Old Posted Nov 26, 2019, 12:07 AM
Sheba Sheba is offline
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Is this a coincidence?

Quote:
Harley-Davidson is hoping to become known for something other than its rumbling hogs — an all-electric motorcycle that hums rather than roars.

Over the weekend, it showed off its Livewire motorcycle at dealerships in Vancouver.

"This is the future, the beginning of electric motorcycles," said Jeff Martinez with the company.

Harley-Davidson is the first major manufacturer to offer electric motorcycles at dealerships. Only 1,800 have been built this year, with the sticker price around $37,000.

...

Martinez says the company wants to move into the future with electric vehicles, just like car manufacturers are.

"This would be a fantastic commuter bike," he said.

Enthusiasts who went to dealerships in Vancouver to check out the bike mostly say they are impressed with it.

...
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  #965  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2019, 8:54 PM
MalcolmTucker MalcolmTucker is offline
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A thread which works out the link between YVR gas prices and pipeline capacity:
https://twitter.com/GK_Fellows/statu...14060455796736

After reading this last night, I spent a bit of time throwing a few data series together and doing some rudimentary statistical/regression analysis. So, I present to you, a thread on Trans-Mountain Apportionment and the YVR rack price.
https://twitter.com/GK_Fellows
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  #966  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2019, 2:54 AM
ClaytonA ClaytonA is offline
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The economist's premise is wrong.
The 13 cents difference is between the Seattle area and YVR.
Higher pipeline apportionment should raise prices in Seattle by the same percentage as in YVR. What logical reason would higher apportionment result in Anacortes refineries lowering the supply of gasoline to YVR versus Seattle?

He misunderstood the issue, probably due to media headlines and an Albertan bias/belief towards how important their oil is to YVR gas prices.
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  #967  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2019, 4:02 AM
MalcolmTucker MalcolmTucker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaytonA View Post
The economist's premise is wrong.
The 13 cents difference is between the Seattle area and YVR.
Higher pipeline apportionment should raise prices in Seattle by the same percentage as in YVR. What logical reason would higher apportionment result in Anacortes refineries lowering the supply of gasoline to YVR versus Seattle?

He misunderstood the issue, probably due to media headlines and an Albertan bias/belief towards how important their oil is to YVR gas prices.
The market isn't perfect between BC and Washington. For whatever reason.
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  #968  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2019, 10:45 AM
WestCoastEcho WestCoastEcho is offline
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Originally Posted by MalcolmTucker View Post
The market isn't perfect between BC and Washington. For whatever reason.
BC's market is constrained by whatever feed that can be supplied via the Trans Mountain pipeline and from whatever can be barged/trucked/railed in.

Washington is different; they can import fuel in from other jurisdictions via feed stock from Trans Mountain, Alaska, rail shipments from out east, and international markets. Their supply chain is fully setup for importing fuel and oil.
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  #969  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2019, 5:25 PM
MalcolmTucker MalcolmTucker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestCoastEcho View Post
BC's market is constrained by whatever feed that can be supplied via the Trans Mountain pipeline and from whatever can be barged/trucked/railed in.

Washington is different; they can import fuel in from other jurisdictions via feed stock from Trans Mountain, Alaska, rail shipments from out east, and international markets. Their supply chain is fully setup for importing fuel and oil.
Probably as simple as not enough trucks. Because who is going to make that investment when demand varies considerably month to month.



I wonder if even increased coordination would allow more barges into Suncor and Imperial - like scheduling the apportionment volumes out an extra 2-4 weeks. Otherwise, unless someone is going to build a new wholesale terminal closer to the border, it is still going to be incredibly inefficient to bring in trucks. It is maybe a 3 hour round trip if traffic isn't atrocious from Cherry Point to either of those terminals. 4 hours for Shell near Anacortes. Plus loading and unloading, any extra friction at the border.
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  #970  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2019, 3:41 AM
WestCoastEcho WestCoastEcho is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalcolmTucker View Post
Probably as simple as not enough trucks. Because who is going to make that investment when demand varies considerably month to month.



I wonder if even increased coordination would allow more barges into Suncor and Imperial - like scheduling the apportionment volumes out an extra 2-4 weeks. Otherwise, unless someone is going to build a new wholesale terminal closer to the border, it is still going to be incredibly inefficient to bring in trucks. It is maybe a 3 hour round trip if traffic isn't atrocious from Cherry Point to either of those terminals. 4 hours for Shell near Anacortes. Plus loading and unloading, any extra friction at the border.
The issue is that the Lower Mainland isn't set up for large scale importing of fuel and oil; the current facilities are set up primarily for export only. Only the Islands can accept regular barge shipments, while the barging in of refined fuel to the Lower Mainland primarily revolves around the supply of jet fuel for YVR.

AFAIK, the only large scale fuel import facility in the Lower Mainland is the under-construction YVR jet fuel terminal and pipeline, which would supplant the existing Trans Mountain spur, and the roughly 70 tanker trucks a day from the US. That new import facility can handle Panamax-sized tankers, which would allow YVR to source jet fuel from overseas.
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