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  #41  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2018, 4:45 PM
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  #42  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 2:50 PM
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  #43  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2018, 11:50 PM
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https://www.slideshare.net/CWS_2010/...s-water-system

The above graph appears to be from 1920, trending Winnipeg's anticipated population to 1960 when it was expected to hit the 1 million mark. It also shows Winnipeg's anticipated growth in comparison to other North American cities from a base population of 50,000 (so Winnipeg was to hit the 1 million mark six decades after reaching 50,000 in 1902). I just found the graph a little interesting as it comes after the Panama Canal and WW1, so it's not the "super boosterism" from Winnipeg's pre-WW1 boom era that was anticipating 4.5 million by 1984, however assuming the above growth trend remained relatively the same to the present day we would be a Vancouver sized city.
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  #44  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 1:58 AM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
It must have been absolutely fascinating living in Winnipeg during the boom years of 1900-1914. It was a time when the general mantra was "anything and everything possible" - Winnipeg's manifest destiny.

Today, it seems Winnipeg can be divided into three categories:

1. "Winnipeg will only get better" - these are the people who actually have a vision for the city, believing what lies ahead is a much more prosperous city. ~10% of the population falls into this category.
What would lead anyone to believe that Winnipeg will be "much more prosperous" in the future? Which economically transformative industries will develop, and why would they do so in Winnipeg? You can have all the visions you want, but by far the most likely scenario is that Winnipeg will continue to be much like it always has been (which is actually one of the appealing things about it, although no one here seems to pick up on that fact or to think about how to exploit the positive consequences of changelessness).
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  #45  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 2:28 AM
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What would lead anyone to believe that Winnipeg will be "much more prosperous" in the future? Which economically transformative industries will develop, and why would they do so in Winnipeg? You can have all the visions you want, but by far the most likely scenario is that Winnipeg will continue to be much like it always has been (which is actually one of the appealing things about it, although no one here seems to pick up on that fact or to think about how to exploit the positive consequences of changelessness).
You just made...........................the list.
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  #46  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 2:30 AM
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The sky is falling!!!!
THE SKY IS FALLING!!!!

oh wait.......................
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  #47  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 2:40 PM
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You just made...........................the list.
You should mention the he doesn't live in Winnipeg yet has a fetish for commenting about it. Might as well get it out.
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  #48  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 7:48 PM
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You just made...........................the list.
Which list? And what are all the little dots for?
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  #49  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 7:49 PM
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I think Ando did before , he had the misfortune of going to Toronto , I like his posts pretty informative some that I don't agree with completely but everyone is entitled to his/ her opinion . I do agree 100% that Winnipegs slower growth has been a blessing in disguise for the city mostly . The "list " he is referring to is Wpg boy Chris Jerichos list of people that piss him off ! ................. Lol
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  #50  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 8:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy6 View Post
What would lead anyone to believe that Winnipeg will be "much more prosperous" in the future? Which economically transformative industries will develop, and why would they do so in Winnipeg? You can have all the visions you want, but by far the most likely scenario is that Winnipeg will continue to be much like it always has been (which is actually one of the appealing things about it, although no one here seems to pick up on that fact or to think about how to exploit the positive consequences of changelessness).
I think it's mostly expats that want our city to be the "Mayberry" of Canada where things don't change. I believe it gives them a sense of comfort to think they can come back home for a visit and step back in time when life was much simpler. Sorry, those of us that live here want this city to progress and prosper. The change that is taking place is what allowed for the return of the Winnipeg Jets. Onwards and upwards!
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  #51  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 9:55 PM
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I think it's mostly expats that want our city to be the "Mayberry" of Canada where things don't change. I believe it gives them a sense of comfort to think they can come back home for a visit and step back in time when life was much simpler. Sorry, those of us that live here want this city to progress and prosper. The change that is taking place is what allowed for the return of the Winnipeg Jets. Onwards and upwards!
Nailed it.
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  #52  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2018, 1:57 PM
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One more interesting demographic, the city's own assessment figures of Winnipeg's growth during the boom era. The figures are for the city population only and do not include the municipalities of Greater Winnipeg (pre-unicity communities) that combined would have included roughly 50,000 more by 1914.
Census population in brackets.

1896: 37,983 (31,649)
1897: 38,733
1898: 39,384
1899: 40,112
1900: 42,534
1901: 44,778 (42,340)
1902: 48,411
1903: 56,741
1904: 67,262
1905: 79,975
1906: 101,057 (90,153)
1907: 111,729
1908: 118,252
1909: 122,390
1910: 132,720
1911: 151,958 (136,035)
1912: 185,000
1913: 201,000
1914: 203,255
1915: 212,889
1916: 201,981 (163,000)
1917: 183,000
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  #53  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2018, 4:16 PM
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What was the huge drop-off from 1916–1917?
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  #54  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2018, 4:21 PM
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what was the huge drop-off from 1916–1917?
ww1
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  #55  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2018, 5:04 PM
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People really started to pack up and move on (westward) around that time too. It was pretty common for people to arrive in Winnipeg around 1905, do well for 7 or 8 years, see things slow down drastically in 1913-14 and during the war, and decide to move on to the next boomtown, whether it was Brandon or Moose Jaw or Calgary or Vancouver, or often California. Jobs were easy to get and easy to lose in those days; people were very mobile.
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  #56  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2018, 1:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DowntownBooster View Post
I think it's mostly expats that want our city to be the "Mayberry" of Canada where things don't change. I believe it gives them a sense of comfort to think they can come back home for a visit and step back in time when life was much simpler. Sorry, those of us that live here want this city to progress and prosper. The change that is taking place is what allowed for the return of the Winnipeg Jets. Onwards and upwards!
That's possible, but not this expat.
I'm certainly not homesick but Winnipeg IS still my home no matter how far I go from it. Considering one of the (very minor) reasons I left Winnipeg was the lack of change, I'd be delighted if it were to experience some kind of boom.
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  #57  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2018, 10:47 PM
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Since 1990, I would consider this a period of change.
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  #58  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2018, 1:06 AM
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^ I would say that fairly little changed from 1990-2000. It's really only in the last 15 years that the city has started to change more visibly.
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  #59  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2018, 1:28 AM
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I meant since 1990 we had little change. Only now is there a boom of sorts. But you are correct. I felt that this construction and population “boom” were more recent. Surprisingly it was after 2000 that it really started to pick up. Amazing how time flies.
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