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  #10041  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 6:03 PM
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Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
Knowing another official language and being bilingual are 2 different things.

While most Ontarians may technically not be registered as bilingual FAR more people can speak basic French than a generation ago. When I went to school, French was optional and only started in high school while today it's mandatory from K to 12. They may not make the cut for being officially bilingual but I think there are far more people who have a basic understanding of another official laguage than use to be the case.
This is quite true, but that distinction is a "tide that lifts all boats".

Unless of course people in certain places are more likely to underestimate or overestimate their second language skills.
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  #10042  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 6:13 PM
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Originally Posted by begratto View Post
Cornwall surprises me at 42%. It doesn't feel like it when visiting the town. When even the St-Hubert bbq functions in English...
It's ability to speak both languages, not that they use both languages in everyday life.

Cornwall is probably close to 50% French Canadian in terms of ethnic origin. But maybe only 25-30% of the population is actually francophones. And of course it's not even all of the francophones who use French in everyday life.

Timmins is also like this. It's maybe 30% francophone but upwards of 50% of the population is of French Canadian origin. Most of these people know at least some French even if they don't use it very often. When walking around Timmins maybe only about 15%-20% of the conversations you overhear are in French.

I am surprised at Sudbury's number. It seems low and awfully close to the solely francophone population share there. Which would mean that almost no one there who is of French Canadian origin (but anglicized) or of other origins, can speak French.
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  #10043  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2017, 1:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It's ability to speak both languages, not that they use both languages in everyday life.

Cornwall is probably close to 50% French Canadian in terms of ethnic origin. But maybe only 25-30% of the population is actually francophones. And of course it's not even all of the francophones who use French in everyday life.

Timmins is also like this. It's maybe 30% francophone but upwards of 50% of the population is of French Canadian origin. Most of these people know at least some French even if they don't use it very often. When walking around Timmins maybe only about 15%-20% of the conversations you overhear are in French.

I am surprised at Sudbury's number. It seems low and awfully close to the solely francophone population share there. Which would mean that almost no one there who is of French Canadian origin (but anglicized) or of other origins, can speak French.
Having grown up in Sudbury, the bilingual number seems about right to me. The bilingual aspect of the city of very concentrated in a few communities - notably Valley East and Rayside-Balfour. Otherwise, the city is relatively anglophone.

I'm not sure why this is.
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  #10044  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2017, 8:55 PM
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A major release of Census Data come out today.

This time income data was release. The income data was linked from CRA records instead of asking income questions during the census. In previous censuses income data was only available for 20% of the households, now income data is available for (almost) all households.


http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quoti...-eng.htm?HPA=1
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  #10045  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2017, 4:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It's ability to speak both languages, not that they use both languages in everyday life.

Cornwall is probably close to 50% French Canadian in terms of ethnic origin. But maybe only 25-30% of the population is actually francophones. And of course it's not even all of the francophones who use French in everyday life.

Timmins is also like this. It's maybe 30% francophone but upwards of 50% of the population is of French Canadian origin. Most of these people know at least some French even if they don't use it very often. When walking around Timmins maybe only about 15%-20% of the conversations you overhear are in French.

I am surprised at Sudbury's number. It seems low and awfully close to the solely francophone population share there. Which would mean that almost no one there who is of French Canadian origin (but anglicized) or of other origins, can speak French.
I'd say that about 65% of the people in Timmins have French-Canadian roots. But almost half of those people probably have a mixed background where they are also part Italian, Irish, Finnish, Ukrainian, Croatian, Cree, etc.. You can never assume here that people can or can't speak French based on their first and last names.
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  #10046  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2017, 4:42 AM
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Originally Posted by wave46 View Post
Having grown up in Sudbury, the bilingual number seems about right to me. The bilingual aspect of the city of very concentrated in a few communities - notably Valley East and Rayside-Balfour. Otherwise, the city is relatively anglophone.

I'm not sure why this is.
It has to do with where people settled in the early days. In Timmins, we have Mountjoy (West end of urban Timmins) where probably about 70% of the people are Francophone. It was its own township separate from Timmins until 1973 and attracted a lot of French-Canadians in the early days for forestry as the sawmills were in that area and to a lesser extent for farming.
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  #10047  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2017, 6:04 PM
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A few predictions regarding Canadian CMA and population milestones over the next two decades:

2018
Vancouver surpasses 2.6 million
Calgary surpasses 1.5 million
Edmonton surpasses 1.4 million
Oshawa surpasses 400,000
2019
Montreal surpasses 4.3 million
Ottawa surpasses 1.4 million
2021
Montreal surpasses 4.4 million
Vancouver surpasses 2.7 million
Calgary surpasses 1.6 million
Edmonton surpasses 1.5 million
Hamilton surpasses 800,000
2022
Toronto surpasses 6.5 million
Victoria surpasses 400,000
2023
KWC surpasses 600,000
2024
Montreal surpasses 4.5 million
Vancouver surpasses 2.8 million
Calgary surpasses 1.7 million
Winnipeg surpasses 900,000
2025
Edmonton surpasses 1.6 million
Ottawa surpasses 1.5 million
2026
Regina surpasses 300,000
Guelph surpasses 200,000
2027
Montreal surpasses 4.6 million
Vancouver surpasses 2.9 million
Calgary surpasses 1.8 million
Quebec City surpasses 900,000
2028
Toronto surpasses 7.0 million
Edmonton surpasses 1.7 million
Saskatoon surpasses 400,000
2030
Montreal surpasses 4.7 million
Vancouver surpasses 3.0 million
Ottawa surpasses 1.6 million
Hamilton surpasses 900,000
2031
Calgary surpasses 1.9 million
Winnipeg surpasses 1.0 million
2032
Edmonton surpasses 1.8 million
KWC surpasses 700,000
Oshawa surpasses 500,000
2033
Montreal surpasses 4.8 million
Vancouver surpasses 3.1 million
2034
Calgary surpasses 2.0 million
Halifax surpassed 500,000
Moncton surpasses 200,000
2035
Toronto surpasses 7.5 million
Edmonton surpasses 1.9 million
Windsor surpasses 400,000
2036
Montreal surpasses 4.9 million
Vancouver surpasses 3.2 million
Ottawa surpasses 1.7 million
London surpasses 600,000
Kelowna surpasses 300,000
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  #10048  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2017, 6:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
I'd say that about 65% of the people in Timmins have French-Canadian roots. But almost half of those people probably have a mixed background where they are also part Italian, Irish, Finnish, Ukrainian, Croatian, Cree, etc.. You can never assume here that people can or can't speak French based on their first and last names.
Many people in Canada it seems, whether in Ontario or elsewhere, don't really identify with being "French Canadian" by ancestry alone, if there's no language connection. By contrast, in many parts of the US, you see people claim to self identify as French Canadian by ancestry/ethnicity alone, but not language, the way say, an Italian-American that speaks no Italian does.
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  #10049  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2017, 6:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
Many people in Canada it seems, whether in Ontario or elsewhere, don't really identify with being "French Canadian" by ancestry alone, if there's no language connection. By contrast, in many parts of the US, you see people claim to self identify as French Canadian by ancestry/ethnicity alone, but not language, the way say, an Italian-American that speaks no Italian does.
I think this is quite true. I'd say most Canadians of French Canadian origin (even heavily of that origin) who don't speak French probably check off "Canadian" as ethnic origin. There is either a stigma attached to "French Canadian" (uppity shit disturbers?) or simply they don't want to be seen as something they are not (native francophones).

In the U.S. there isn't as much of a distinction within this demographic as most everyone is assimilated and only a few still speak French, and even fewer have French as a home language.

It's very common to see people of French Canadian origin in the U.S. who don't speak any French heavily involved in the "Franco-American Association of XXX". You'd never see a Gary Tremblay who speaks no French involved in that type of organization in Canada.
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  #10050  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2017, 9:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post

In the U.S. there isn't as much of a distinction within this demographic as most everyone is assimilated and only a few still speak French, and even fewer have French as a home language.
Another thing that seems to be the case is that assimilated anglophones with French last names in Canada still often pronounce their last names as it would sound in French, while assimilated non-French speaking Americans that have French last names often pronounce it nothing at all like the French.
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  #10051  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2017, 1:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
Another thing that seems to be the case is that assimilated anglophones with French last names in Canada still often pronounce their last names as it would sound in French,
Or at least in a way that somewhat resembles the way it's said in French.
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  #10052  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2017, 2:09 PM
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Where are the July 1 2017 population estimates? They should have been out last Friday
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  #10053  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2017, 3:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
A few predictions regarding Canadian CMA and population milestones over the next two decades:

2018
Vancouver surpasses 2.6 million
Calgary surpasses 1.5 million
Edmonton surpasses 1.4 million
Oshawa surpasses 400,000
2019
Montreal surpasses 4.3 million
Ottawa surpasses 1.4 million
2021
Montreal surpasses 4.4 million
Vancouver surpasses 2.7 million
Calgary surpasses 1.6 million
Edmonton surpasses 1.5 million
Hamilton surpasses 800,000
2022
Toronto surpasses 6.5 million
Victoria surpasses 400,000
2023
KWC surpasses 600,000
2024
Montreal surpasses 4.5 million
Vancouver surpasses 2.8 million
Calgary surpasses 1.7 million
Winnipeg surpasses 900,000
2025
Edmonton surpasses 1.6 million
Ottawa surpasses 1.5 million
2026
Regina surpasses 300,000
Guelph surpasses 200,000
2027
Montreal surpasses 4.6 million
Vancouver surpasses 2.9 million
Calgary surpasses 1.8 million
Quebec City surpasses 900,000
2028
Toronto surpasses 7.0 million
Edmonton surpasses 1.7 million
Saskatoon surpasses 400,000
2030
Montreal surpasses 4.7 million
Vancouver surpasses 3.0 million
Ottawa surpasses 1.6 million
Hamilton surpasses 900,000
2031
Calgary surpasses 1.9 million
Winnipeg surpasses 1.0 million
2032
Edmonton surpasses 1.8 million
KWC surpasses 700,000
Oshawa surpasses 500,000
2033
Montreal surpasses 4.8 million
Vancouver surpasses 3.1 million
2034
Calgary surpasses 2.0 million
Halifax surpassed 500,000
Moncton surpasses 200,000
2035
Toronto surpasses 7.5 million
Edmonton surpasses 1.9 million
Windsor surpasses 400,000
2036
Montreal surpasses 4.9 million
Vancouver surpasses 3.2 million
Ottawa surpasses 1.7 million
London surpasses 600,000
Kelowna surpasses 300,000
I can see Windsor hitting 400,000 before 2035, probably around 2028. Our economy has really taken off since the 2016 census was taken. The city is growing at 1.2% a year now, and that number keeps going up! Also if Essex is added to our metro, that will boost the numbers by another 20,000.
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  #10054  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2017, 2:23 PM
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  #10055  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2017, 2:37 PM
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Atlantic Canada growth due solely to immigration...like it has to for the next few decades
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  #10056  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2017, 3:37 PM
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Atlantic Canada growth due solely to immigration...like it has to for the next few decades
Like everywhere though. If not for international immigration, there's hardly a city in the country that would be growing.
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  #10057  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2017, 4:32 PM
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Like everywhere though. If not for international immigration, there's hardly a city in the country that would be growing.
Indeed, only difference being that the Atlantic Provinces are joining the party some 50 years too late.
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  #10058  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2017, 4:51 PM
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  #10059  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2017, 8:21 PM
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good numbers for Ontario and Quebec. would love to see Quebec above 100k year after year.
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  #10060  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2017, 6:23 PM
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Interesting how Ontario experienced a net inter-provincial gain from every province, that hasn't happened in a VERY long time.

So much for the rise of the West.
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