HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #61  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2011, 3:41 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
City prepares for Giant construction (Northwest Current)

This will be a good project for the area near the National Cathedral on Wisconsin Avenue. New housing, a new supermarket, and additional retail will replace a dated 1950s era store and large surface parking lot in what is otherwise a very walkable neighborhood. This development and the relocation of the American University law school to Tenley Circle will make Wisconsin Avenue more lively and attractive.

City prepares for Giant construction

By Teke Wiggin
Current Newspapers
1/26/2011

As Cleveland Park residents continue to voice concerns over transportation issues raised by the impending Giant redevelopment, the D.C. Department of
Transportation is making efforts to address their worries, especially those pertaining to truck activity and parking shortages.

“This development [team] knows that many eyes are watching them, so I’d expect them to take extra care,” Transportation Department associate director Karina Ricks said of the “Cathedral Commons” project. The development will create a new, larger Giant supermarket, 72,850 square feet of additional retail, 138 apartments and eight town houses near McLean Gardens.

Residents, concerned that noisy vehicles going to and from the construction site will invade their neighborhood, took up a large portion of a recent meeting’s question-and-answer session asking about the rules governing truck routes and how they are enforced...."

http://www.currentnewspapers.com/adm...N%2026%201.pdf
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #62  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2011, 3:36 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
Developers add housing, possibly a hotel, to Hine Junior High development (WP 2/2/11)

Developers add housing, possibly a hotel, to Hine Junior High development

By Jonathan O'Connell
Washington Post
Wednesday, February 2, 2011; 10:31 PM

"Two nonprofit groups, the Shakespeare Theatre Co. and International Relief and Development, have canceled plans to open offices in a planned redevelopment of the former Hine Junior High School on Capitol Hill.

Developers EastBanc and Stanton are reducing the size of the project at Pennsylvania Avenue and Seventh Street SE by 85,000 square feet, said Joseph Sternlieb, vice president of acquisitions for District-based EastBanc. The modified plans call for a 557,000-square-foot project that will add housing units, and possibly a boutique hotel with 120 to 140 rooms, at Seventh and C streets.

The District closed Hine and 22 other school buildings after the 2007-08 school year.



The withdrawal of the Shakespeare Theatre and International Relief and Development, an anti-poverty group that had planned to move its headquarters from Arlington County, leaves the developers with no office tenants for the property. The Tiger Woods Foundation had opted against opening space on the site after the golf icon's personal scandal in 2009..."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...020207034.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #63  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2011, 5:30 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
EastBanc switches offices to residential (Georgetown Current)

Thirteen parking spaces for nine units is pretty excessive.

EastBanc switches offices to residential

Developer EastBanc has changed course again on a planned addition to the Georgetown PostOffice at 1215 31st St.

Following a directive from the city’s Office of Planning, EastBanc is planning a residential project behind the post office, abandoning previous plans for an office building.

The project will be a three-story, nine-unit building with 13 parking spots, architect Guy Martin said at Monday night’s Georgetown advisory neighborhood commission meeting.

The addition will join to the rear of the original 1850s post office, once a customs house and office of the last mayor of Georgetown..."

http://www.currentnewspapers.com/adm...EB%202%201.pdf
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #64  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2011, 4:52 AM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
Developer: Whole Foods deal near Nationals Park would require $8 million in tax break

This is ridiculous. This location is within a 10-12 minute walk of three metro stations. The District simply does not have the funds to give a $800,000 subsidy to build and additional level of parking that will only encourage more driving and undermine transit ridership. I'd say no thanks to the Whole Foods. There is a beautiful new Safeway one stop away on the Green line.

Developer: Whole Foods deal near Nationals Park would require $8 million in tax breaks

"Whole Foods Market and a D.C. real estate firm are interested in building a new store in Southeast Washington near Nationals Park, but the developer says that luring the grocer would require $8 million in tax breaks.

William C. Smith and Co. is proposing a 39,000-square-foot Whole Foods for 800 New Jersey Ave. SE as part of a building that would include 375 apartments.

The arrival of the popular grocer on the site, which is currently a parking lot, would possibly inject new life into a neighborhood where dozens of development plans have stalled after the recent economic collapse. The developer, however, is asking that the city provide an $8 million property-tax abatement over 10 years in order to make the project financially viable, a difficult request because the city filled a $188 million budget gap for this fiscal year and might face a shortfall of more than $440 million next year..."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...021405717.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #65  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2011, 5:00 AM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
Yet another subsidy for driving while our metro system is crumbling. I think the entire Capitol Bikeshare network cost less than $4M to build. We should absolutely not give $800,000 per year to finance more off-street parking.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #66  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 3:06 AM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
NY Times profile of Columbia Heights

The NY Times has a good slideshow of Columbia Heights.

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/201...SURFACING.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #67  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2011, 4:22 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
Expanding Downtown (Transport Politic 2/25/2011)

I attended a very interesting discussion by Chris Leinberger (Brookings, U. of Michigan), sponsored by the U. of Michigan DC alumni club, of which my friend is the president, on Thursday. Mr. Leinberger said that within the next 15 years, the not only will all the land in the central business district of DC be developed but most of the remaining parcels in the downtown adjacent neighborhoods (Southeast Waterfront, L'Enfant, NoMa, etc...) will be developed as well (http://www.bayareavision.org/marketp...einberger).pdf , Slide 26). Mr. Leinberger also noted that we have overbuilt the traditional auto-dependent suburbs, as this was largely the only type of development built from 1945 - 1990/95. He said there is now a huge pent-up demand for housing in walkable urban communities. Something like 70-80 percent of households in the next couple of decades will be childless (either the retired baby-boom generation or the Millenials who are delaying marriage and child-rearing). Another interesting point was that in 2000, a house in McLean or Great Falls, with some of the best schools in the country was selling for 25% more per square foot than a house in a walkable urban neighborhood in Dupont, with some of the worst schools in the country. By the end of the decade, the house in Dupont was selling for 75% more per square foot than the house in McLean (slide 15).

Regarding this posting on the Transport Politic blog, Nat Bottigheimer from WMATA noted in his presentation to the Tenley Historical Society in October 2010 that peak period trips into the central business district of Washington on the Red Line will grow modestly because the downtown core is mostly built out. With the development of White Flint and North Bethesda, many of the new trips will be reverse commuting. The real capacity challenge for Metro rail is on the Orange and Blue lines, especially in Rosslyn, with the continued growth of the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor and more importantly, the massive redevelopment of Tysons from an edge city to a walkable urban area. Chris Leinberger called the Tysons transformation 'the mother of all redevelopments,' with perhaps as much as 100M square feet of new development. I've read elsewhere that this could very well be the largest development project outside of Dubai. A Greater Greater Washington post on the Tysons transformation said that it will have as much office space as Seattle when completed. I asked Mr. Leinberger to describe the scale of this, since most people can't fathom how much development 100M square feet is. He said it will be roughly the equivalent of creating another Rosslyn-Ballston corridor.

Expanding Downtown

Yonah Freemark
February 25th, 2011

"Washington, D.C. is a lucky city: Its downtown has been filled up with new construction over the past few decades to such an extent that it has virtually no space for new office buildings. Some, like Matt Yglesias, have suggested that one way to resolve this problem would be to increase densities by ridding the city of its height limit, which in essence makes it impossible to build structures in the city that are over about 10 stories. Lydia Depillis, another local commenter, has argued that the municipality still has plenty of developable sites which, though they may not be directly downtown, still offer opportunities for more office space.

What would be the manifestations of these different approaches? How can we weigh the advantages and disadvantages of upzoning the center city for more office space? Is our goal to produce vital, walkable, and dense downtown districts, or simply to expand new construction there, no matter the use?

The missing ingredient in this discussion is transportation. When we discuss the demand in downtowns like Washington’s for more office space, we sometimes make an assumption that the transport network will be able to handle whatever is thrown at it. In fact, there is a direct relationship between a downtown’s growth and the transportation provided to it. In general, businesses want to locate their offices in places that are accessible and that provide the benefits of agglomeration, and this sometimes means downtown, but not always. If the trip to and from the center — by whatever mode — becomes too arduous, there are significant reasons to locate outside of it. How does this fact apply to a place like Washington..."

http://www.thetransportpolitic.com/2...ding-downtown/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #68  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2011, 7:33 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
EastBanc plans two new Georgetown projects (Washington Business Journal)

Good riddance. This is some of the most valuable property in the country. Building 35 new $2M - $3M condos here will bring the District significant new tax revenue.

EastBanc plans two new Georgetown projects


By Sarah Krouse
Friday, February 25, 2011
Washington Business Journal

"EastBanc Inc. is planning two new residential projects in Georgetown that are poised to offer the first new high-end condos after the recession.

[IMG]http://assets.bizjournals.com/washington/news/3607%20M%20St.*900.jpg[/IMG]

The Georgetown developer has the Key Bridge Exxon station at 3607 M St. NW under contract with plans to build 35 to 37 new units likely to be condominiums.

The current owner, Anacostia Realty LLC, will continue to operate the gas station on site through July 2012..."

http://www.bizjournals.com/washingto...eorgetown.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #69  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2011, 7:53 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
Planning board approves N. Bethesda project (Gazette 2/23/2011)

Planning board approves N. Bethesda project


Mixed-use project follows earlier site plans

By Sonny Goldreich
2/23/2011

"Spring is here, the snow has melted, the geese are honking and developers are flocking back to feather projects that lay dormant during the winter of recession.

Or so it appears, as the latest and one of the most ambitious proposals approved Thursday by the Montgomery County Planning Board would allow a 1.2 million-square-foot mixed-use complex to be built in the Rock Spring Centre opposite Walter Johnson High School in North Bethesda.

The action revives prospects for DRI Development of Washington, D.C., to embark on a massive build-out of the site, where a number of earlier plans featured luxury apartment or condominium towers, retail and office space and a spa resort."

http://gazette.net/stories/02232011/...2712_32561.php
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #70  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2011, 11:01 AM
babybackribs2314 babybackribs2314 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: UWS, Manhattan
Posts: 1,728
Quote:
Originally Posted by 202_Cyclist View Post
I attended a very interesting discussion by Chris Leinberger (Brookings, U. of Michigan), sponsored by the U. of Michigan DC alumni club, of which my friend is the president, on Thursday. Mr. Leinberger said that within the next 15 years, the not only will all the land in the central business district of DC be developed but most of the remaining parcels in the downtown adjacent neighborhoods (Southeast Waterfront, L'Enfant, NoMa, etc...) will be developed as well (http://www.bayareavision.org/marketp...einberger).pdf , Slide 26). Mr. Leinberger also noted that we have overbuilt the traditional auto-dependent suburbs, as this was largely the only type of development built from 1945 - 1990/95. He said there is now a huge pent-up demand for housing in walkable urban communities. Something like 70-80 percent of households in the next couple of decades will be childless (either the retired baby-boom generation or the Millenials who are delaying marriage and child-rearing). Another interesting point was that in 2000, a house in McLean or Great Falls, with some of the best schools in the country was selling for 25% more per square foot than a house in a walkable urban neighborhood in Dupont, with some of the worst schools in the country. By the end of the decade, the house in Dupont was selling for 75% more per square foot than the house in McLean (slide 15).

Regarding this posting on the Transport Politic blog, Nat Bottigheimer from WMATA noted in his presentation to the Tenley Historical Society in October 2010 that peak period trips into the central business district of Washington on the Red Line will grow modestly because the downtown core is mostly built out. With the development of White Flint and North Bethesda, many of the new trips will be reverse commuting. The real capacity challenge for Metro rail is on the Orange and Blue lines, especially in Rosslyn, with the continued growth of the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor and more importantly, the massive redevelopment of Tysons from an edge city to a walkable urban area. Chris Leinberger called the Tysons transformation 'the mother of all redevelopments,' with perhaps as much as 100M square feet of new development. I've read elsewhere that this could very well be the largest development project outside of Dubai. A Greater Greater Washington post on the Tysons transformation said that it will have as much office space as Seattle when completed. I asked Mr. Leinberger to describe the scale of this, since most people can't fathom how much development 100M square feet is. He said it will be roughly the equivalent of creating another Rosslyn-Ballston corridor.

Expanding Downtown

Yonah Freemark
February 25th, 2011

"Washington, D.C. is a lucky city: Its downtown has been filled up with new construction over the past few decades to such an extent that it has virtually no space for new office buildings. Some, like Matt Yglesias, have suggested that one way to resolve this problem would be to increase densities by ridding the city of its height limit, which in essence makes it impossible to build structures in the city that are over about 10 stories. Lydia Depillis, another local commenter, has argued that the municipality still has plenty of developable sites which, though they may not be directly downtown, still offer opportunities for more office space.

What would be the manifestations of these different approaches? How can we weigh the advantages and disadvantages of upzoning the center city for more office space? Is our goal to produce vital, walkable, and dense downtown districts, or simply to expand new construction there, no matter the use?

The missing ingredient in this discussion is transportation. When we discuss the demand in downtowns like Washington’s for more office space, we sometimes make an assumption that the transport network will be able to handle whatever is thrown at it. In fact, there is a direct relationship between a downtown’s growth and the transportation provided to it. In general, businesses want to locate their offices in places that are accessible and that provide the benefits of agglomeration, and this sometimes means downtown, but not always. If the trip to and from the center — by whatever mode — becomes too arduous, there are significant reasons to locate outside of it. How does this fact apply to a place like Washington..."

http://www.thetransportpolitic.com/2...ding-downtown/
100M square feet of new space in Tysons would be truly remarkable; I think that much development could put enough pressure on Tysons to sprout the first real 500'+ skyscrapers of the region. If Tysons can integrate other transit types (streetcars, etc) into the heavy rail, it would be extremely successful, so the entire city would actually function like a city.

The photos of Tysons the next few years are going to be nuts, as development is really supposed to begin this year on several projects.

I think the height limits of downtown DC really should stay, as well. They've encouraged the creation of so many new urban neighborhoods in MD and VA, as development continues to move outwards while downtown DC remains vibrant. It's crazy how downtown DC is literally only a few lots away from being completely maxed out.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #71  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2011, 2:16 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
babybackribs2314:
Quote:
I think the height limits of downtown DC really should stay, as well. They've encouraged the creation of so many new urban neighborhoods in MD and VA, as development continues to move outwards while downtown DC remains vibrant.
This is exactly why I think the height limit should be re-examined. Being a District resident, I don't like to see the District lose out on all the property, business, and income tax revenue that is shifted to other jurisdictions because the District is unable to accommodate this demand for growth. I don't mean to take a beggar-thy-neighbor approach but even with all the growth and change the District has been through in the past decade, we still have staggering social problems. This tax revenue that is lost to MD and VA could be used to improve our schools and pay for other important services.

As Christopher Leinberger pointed out in his discussion, most of the new development is also concentrated in the 'favored quarter' (i.e. Montgomery Co, FFX Co, and NW DC), although this is changing a bit. Most of the unemployment and poverty, however, is concentrated in the eastern half of the DC region. This leads to a mismatch of where new jobs are created and an available labor pool that can use them. This isn't to blame anyone. One response to address this is to do a much better job of creating transit-oriented development in Prince Georges Co.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #72  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2011, 1:05 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
UDC campus plan

Here's a link for a new student center on the University of the District of Columbia (UDC) campus:

http://odd.greatergreaterwashington....dcbuilding.pdf

The architecture of this building has received some really mixed responses but anything to improve this sterile area of DC is welcomed. This is directly next to the Van Ness metro station but the Van Ness section of DC lacks any kind of pedestrian or street life most of the time, despite being on the Red line and in an affluent area. The UDC campus, in particular, is made up of a collection of large, cold, brutalist buildings that are setback significantly from the street and the that don't engage the surrounding neighborhood.

The plaza where the new student center depicted in these renderings would be built is a largely vacant, brick plaza, with little shade or anything else to attract people walking by.

Across the street and a little north from the UDC campus, a developer plans to build a dozen condos where the current Shanghai Garden restaurant is. This is further help to enliven the neighborhood.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #73  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2011, 3:01 PM
photoLith's Avatar
photoLith photoLith is offline
Ex Houstonian
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oakland, Pittsburgh
Posts: 11,195
Hopefully every major city in the US can see development and revitalization that dc has gotten over the past two decades. Dc is one of the last cities I haven't visited in north America, I need to get over there really bad.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #74  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2011, 3:10 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
photolitherland:
Quote:
Hopefully every major city in the US can see development and revitalization that dc has gotten over the past two decades. Dc is one of the last cities I haven't visited in north America, I need to get over there really bad.
Absolutely. The change in DC over the past decade has been amazing. The District and Arlington, with the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor, should serve as a national model of how to build successful walkable, transit-oriented development. As Christopher Leingberger (Brookings/U. of Michigan), recently noted, the redevelopment of Tysons Corner will also be a national model of how to redevelop edge-cities and late-20th century shopping districts.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #75  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2011, 9:58 PM
ardecila's Avatar
ardecila ardecila is offline
atomic
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: the city o'wind
Posts: 12,563
Is it feasible for DC to take the La Defense approach and find an area of Southeast away from major flight paths and sight lines, where highrises could be built and transit expanded? Moscow has already taken this approach with its International Business Center.

Rosslyn already acts sorta like La Defense given its prominent position at the end of the Mall, but as was already mentioned, DC doesn't get any of that tax revenue, and the building heights are strictly capped by the FAA because of the approaches to Reagan.
__________________
la forme d'une ville change plus vite, hélas! que le coeur d'un mortel...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #76  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2011, 3:01 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
The Graduate School to expand with new campus on D.C.'s Southwest waterfront

The Graduate School to expand with new campus on D.C.'s Southwest waterfront

By Jonathan O'Connell
Washington Post
March 9, 2011


The school plans to lease 190,000 square feet at the corner of Maine Avenue and Ninth Street. It will keep its leases at L'Enfant Plaza. (Image courtesy of the Wasington Post)

"The Graduate School USA, formerly an affiliate of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, plans to more than double its physical size in coming years by opening a new campus in a planned redevelopment of the District's Southwest waterfront.

The school serves about 200,000 people annually in mostly non-degree courses, many aimed at preparing them to work in the federal government.

But Jerry Ice, president and chief executive, said the school needs more space. The 47 classrooms the school leases at L'Enfant Plaza are nearly booked every day from early morning until 10 p.m., he said. The school will lease an additional 190,000 square feet - it has about 130,000 now - in a building planned for the corner of Maine Avenue and Ninth Street SW, part of a nearly $2 billion, 10-year project by developers PN Hoffman and Madison Marquette..."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...030904918.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #77  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2011, 3:19 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
Alexandria waterfront small area plan

Waterfront Reading
Draft small-area plan is finally available.

By Michael Lee Pope
March 07, 2011
Connection Newspapers

"At long last, the wait is over. Planning officials have finally released the long-awaited draft Waterfront Small Area Plan, which could guide redevelopment along the Potomac River for the next 15 years. The 141-page document is the result of months of discussions, public hearings and work sessions. In April, the Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing on the plan. The City Council could docket its public hearing as early as May.

"Some interest in some development has surfaced," said Planning Director Faroll Hamer. "I think that’s because of the plan."

Each of the five chapters has a set of recommendations, ranging from building hotels on the Robinson Terminal sites to constructing at 200-foot pier at the foot of King Street. Responding to concerns about building piers in waters owned by the District of Columbia, the draft presents an alternative scenario that would stop redevelopment efforts at the city limits. Overall, the plan would cost taxpayers as much as $41 million, although planning officials estimate it would generate $45 million in revenue..."


Image courtesy of the Connection Newspapers

http://www.connectionnewspapers.com/...per=88&cat=104
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #78  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2011, 7:54 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
AU set on dorms despite ANC’s vote (Northwest Current)

AU set on dorms despite ANC’s vote

By BRADY HOLT
Northwest Current
3/10/2011

“While neighbors have formally requested that American University not build student housing on the site of its Nebraska Avenue parking lot, university officials say they remain committed to building dorms on the East Campus.

The Spring Valley/Wesley Heights advisory neighborhood commission voted last Wednesday to send the university a nine-page letter outlining dozens of requested changes to a draft version of the American University campus plan — with the housing stipulation among them.

Neighbors are concerned about noise and the aesthetic effects of putting hundreds of students on a plot that backs to the Westover Place town houses. Many residents have said they would have no complaint if the parking lot were redeveloped into administrative space, if the new buildings were shorter and if there were more green space.”

http://www.currentnewspapers.com/adm...CH%209%201.pdf
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #79  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2011, 7:55 PM
202_Cyclist's Avatar
202_Cyclist 202_Cyclist is offline
Trump for Treason.
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: No Trump. No KKK. No racism in the USA.
Posts: 3,982
Appeals court hears debate over Giant redevelopment (Northwest Current)

Appeals court hears debate over Giant redevelopment
Zoning: Neighborhood groups challenge procedures

By ELIZABETH WIENER
Northwest Current
3/10/2011

The decade-long battle over the Giant supermarket site on Wisconsin Avenue is now playing out at the D.C. Court of Appeals, which heard arguments Tuesday that the city Zoning Commission erred when it approved an ambitious retail and residential development for two blocks in 2009.

A three-judge panel handling case was clearly interested not only in arcane zoning questions but also in the impact — on both the city and immediate neighborhood — of a new 56,000-square-foot supermarket and other shops, set to go south of Newark Street, and a five-story residential and retail building planned for the low-scale block to the north.

Controversy over the project that has divided the community for years may not be resolved until the court rules. “We all want a new supermarket,” said Dan Hecker, who lives across the street from the project site. “But nobody in the community is cheering for a five-story building to the north.”

http://www.currentnewspapers.com/adm...CH%209%201.pdf
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #80  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2011, 3:33 AM
OhioGuy OhioGuy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: DC
Posts: 6,982
CityMarket Moving Forward

Quote:
Yes, it's true. Activity is starting soon on CityMarket at O. Roadside picked up the permit for the facade support and Clark has ordered the steel and is planning to start the facade support of the O Street Market building at the end of February. The facade support project is estimated to take up to three months.

In the meantime, Roadside will be finishing its construction drawings for HUD on March 1 and completing the permit process for a project construction start in late summer 2011 if all goes as planned with HUD closing.


Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 8:39 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.