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  #41  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2013, 5:39 PM
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Banff National Park is the most visited Alberta tourist destination and one of the most visited national parks in North America, with 3,927,557 visitors in 2004/2005.[6][38] During summer, 42% of park visitors are from Canada (23% from Alberta), while 35% are from the United States, and 20% from Europe.[39] Tourism in Banff contributes an estimated C$6 billion annually to the economy.[40]
SOURCE: wikipedia

Some iconic views from Banff National Park:


Moraine Lake by mlau1234, on Flickr


Moraine Lake, Banff National Park by Terry McDonald - www.luxborealis.com, on Flickr


Bow Lake by Tim.Haughton, on Flickr


Banff Springs Hotel seen from above the Bow River Falls by MomentaryShutter, on Flickr
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  #42  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2013, 8:00 PM
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Originally Posted by MeIsThomas View Post

Hamilton Photo Tour

On skyscrapercity.com, a user named Jaybird recently took his first trip to Hamilton and made a great photo tour. His negative impression of what Hamilton is completely changed.




Here is what he said at the start of his photo tour:

"I paid my first real visit to the nearby city of Hamilton, Ontario (120 km or about 70 miles) on the weekend of February 1, 2013. I spent the weekend in the city of 520,000 taking a picture tour of downtown, toured the city's famous historic 19th century mansion, Dundurn Castle, attended a Hamilton Bulldogs AHL hockey game (they are the farm team of the NHL's Montreal Canadiens), toured Durand, one of Canada's most architecturally diverse neighborhoods, Locke Street Village, and went to a theatrical play at Theatre Aquarius.

Also, I have a statement to make. To anyone who has gotten a negative impression of the city of Hamilton for its steel mills passing by on the PLEASE DON'T LET THE STEEL MILLS FOOL YOU, because behind it is a vibrant growing city with great civic pride and a sense of community with lots to see and do! If you come to this great city with an open mind like I did, I'm sure you will get the same impression.

In the past a long time ago, I know I have said some negative comments about the city, but that's because I didn't know the city well and because I took too much pride in London, the city closest to me, and to the people on the forums who live in or like Hamilton and take pride in their community, I sincerely apologize and take back those comments."


CLICK HERE for the photo tour
Jaybird just posted part 2 of his photo tour. I'd definitely recommend taking a look through it. It'll make you want to visit Hamilton.

CLICK HERE for part 2 of the photo tour
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  #43  
Old Posted May 3, 2013, 10:46 AM
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A few tourism promotion videos for the village of Elliston.

Our national dish.

Video Link


And their biggest festival.

Video Link


I love how baygirls dress.
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  #44  
Old Posted May 3, 2013, 11:28 AM
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Sadly, the joys of cod were lost to me forever 30 years ago when I visited a fish packing plant in Newfoundland and saw the filets being inspected on the candling table so that the parasitic worms could be removed. Sometimes it just seems better not to know.
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  #45  
Old Posted May 3, 2013, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Sadly, the joys of cod were lost to me forever 30 years ago when I visited a fish packing plant in Newfoundland and saw the filets being inspected on the candling table so that the parasitic worms could be removed. Sometimes it just seems better not to know.


It was destroyed for me the first time I tasted Manitoba pickerell (sp?). That fish is delicious. Turned cod into haddock for me... but you can't admit that here.

My father (my parents taught on a northern Manitoba reserve to experience the north after they retired, went for 6 months and stayed 3.5 years) still gets his friends up there to send pickerell down to him. Just for badness, he hands it out to friends here telling them it's cod. And all they say is, "Best cod I ever tasted!", etc.

It's been years now, he still hasn't told them the difference, he's still doing it. He enjoys watching them too much.
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  #46  
Old Posted May 3, 2013, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post


It was destroyed for me the first time I tasted Manitoba pickerell (sp?). That fish is delicious. Turned cod into haddock for me... but you can't admit that here.

My father (my parents taught on a northern Manitoba reserve to experience the north after they retired, went for 6 months and stayed 3.5 years) still gets his friends up there to send pickerell down to him. Just for badness, he hands it out to friends here telling them it's cod. And all they say is, "Best cod I ever tasted!", etc.

It's been years now, he still hasn't told them the difference, he's still doing it. He enjoys watching them too much.
That's funny. Several better restaurants in K-W now serve pickerel and it is fabulous - you just try not to think about the fact that it's so fresh because it was swimming in Lake Erie the day before!
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  #47  
Old Posted May 3, 2013, 2:02 PM
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*LOVE* Amelia Curran. Just LOVE LOVE LOVE!

Video Link


And here's why...

Video Link
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  #48  
Old Posted May 3, 2013, 2:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Sadly, the joys of cod were lost to me forever 30 years ago when I visited a fish packing plant in Newfoundland and saw the filets being inspected on the candling table so that the parasitic worms could be removed. Sometimes it just seems better not to know.
It probably sounds really gross to you and others but I have fond childhood memories of chewing on salty cod that was dried in the sun on these thingies:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fish_flake
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  #49  
Old Posted May 3, 2013, 2:21 PM
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They're still an expression here.

If you want to say... actually, I don't know how to explain this one without an example.

My parents have their neighbours over for dinner all the time. And my mother puts out all the right utensils, even though she doesn't give a shit if people know how to use them properly, or care to do.

If you were there, and your spouse used the wrong fork, you could say, "I got her straight off the fish flakes."

It's just a way of explaining that someone is down to earth, no facade, might be a bit rough around the edges.
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  #50  
Old Posted May 3, 2013, 3:01 PM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
They're still an expression here.

If you want to say... actually, I don't know how to explain this one without an example.

My parents have their neighbours over for dinner all the time. And my mother puts out all the right utensils, even though she doesn't give a shit if people know how to use them properly, or care to do.

If you were there, and your spouse used the wrong fork, you could say, "I got her straight off the fish flakes."

It's just a way of explaining that someone is down to earth, no facade, might be a bit rough around the edges.
To be honest I had never heard the expression fish flakes before an hour ago when I looked up dried cod. All of my discussions about this had taken place in French with Acadian relatives. Though I can't recall what they called fish flakes in French. Guess I will have to ask my dad.
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  #51  
Old Posted May 4, 2013, 12:57 AM
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Calgary Economic Development produced this slick video recently:

Video Link
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  #52  
Old Posted May 4, 2013, 1:01 AM
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I've been listening to that song at least once a day since Ayreonaut shared that video on FB. It's AWESOME (the video). It doesn't have that generic Canadian nothingness. It has personality. It's clearly Calgary. And Ayreonaut said it's authentic as well, as Calgary really is a city that lives in the outdoors as it shows.
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  #53  
Old Posted May 6, 2013, 2:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
To be honest I had never heard the expression fish flakes before an hour ago when I looked up dried cod. All of my discussions about this had taken place in French with Acadian relatives. Though I can't recall what they called fish flakes in French. Guess I will have to ask my dad.
Acadian French word for fish flake: vigneau. My dad had never heard of the word fish flake even though he has spoken English since childhood.
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  #54  
Old Posted May 6, 2013, 2:25 AM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post


I've been listening to that song at least once a day since Ayreonaut shared that video on FB. It's AWESOME (the video). It doesn't have that generic Canadian nothingness. It has personality. It's clearly Calgary. And Ayreonaut said it's authentic as well, as Calgary really is a city that lives in the outdoors as it shows.

This reminds me of this music video by Len (of 'Steal my Sunshine' fame). It doesn't actually have anything to do with promoting tourism in Toronto, but it sure as hell comes off as an official Tourism Toronto video:


Video Link
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  #55  
Old Posted May 6, 2013, 3:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Acadian French word for fish flake: vigneau. My dad had never heard of the word fish flake even though he has spoken English since childhood.
If it's any consolation, I as a native English speaker had never heard the term before this comment and had to google it. I certainly had seen them in videos and such, but didn't know the word for them.
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  #56  
Old Posted May 6, 2013, 4:56 AM
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Here's a crash course in Edmonton 101 that I think is apt for tourists, especially urban minded ones...

Places
- West Edmonton Mall: I'm putting it here first to get it out of the way. People on here like to discount WEM, and while I do agree with the premise that you should see other, more interesting places, if you've never been to Edmonton and have an extra day to spare (after doing stuff I mention after this), you shouldn't skimp out on West Edmonton Mall. Loads of shops, a giant waterpark, world's largest indoor rollercoaster, skating rink, etc. You could go just for the new Simons store (especially Westerners who don't happen to be able to hop down the 401 to Montreal like Torontonians can).

- Old Strathcona: centred along Whyte (82nd) Ave, this is Edmonton's must see neighbourhood. There's an eclectic indoor farmers market just north of Whyte, held every Saturday year round. Whyte Ave itself has lots of neat shops, restaurants, bars, and of course, live theatre. Chicken Scratch for knick-knacks, Blackbyrd for local music (and other stuff), and Old Strathcona Antique Mall for a trip down memory lane. Tutti Frutti, Famoso, Chianti, Dadeo's, Route 99, or straight from the market. Commercial Hotel has some great music. Try to catch some live theatre if you're into that sort of thing. If you go north on 105th St, until its terminus at Saskatchewan Drive, you can get some great skyline views.

- Downtown: lots to do here. Churchill Square is abuzz with activity in the spring and summer. Radiating it is Edmonton's City Hall, the Art Gallery of Alberta (AGA), Citadel Theatre, Winspear, and Edmonton's main public library. The AGA routinely has great exhibits, Citadel has had some amazing theatre, and the Winspear's acoustics are fantastic. You can stroll 104th St for some neat Edwardian-era industrial architecture, along with trendy cafes, restaurants, and little shops. Great little strip, mostly between Jasper and 103 Ave. The Alberta Legislature is also a great building to marvel at, in the SW corner of Downtown. Beaver Hills Park is a neat little oasis, with mini waterfall, on 105th and Jasper. Edmonton's CN Tower is a great example of the modernist high-rise. Businesses to check out: Blue Plate Diner, Three Banana's, Sherlock Holmes, Audreys Books, Remedy Cafe.

- High Level Bridge: Connects Downtown to Garneau and Old Strathcona. Beautiful bridge with great views.

- Victoria Promenade: Edmonton has an expansive river valley, to remedy that, the Victoria Promenade offers sweeping views of it. Great place to chill out and soak in the views.

- 124th St area: Less busy compared to Old Strathcona, but still tons to do. The area around Jasper Ave and 124th is home to the Gallery Walk, which houses some fantastic local art in private galleries. Just off 124th, at 125th and 102nd, is High Street, which has lots of neat boutiques. Further up the street there are more interesting shops, as well as restaurants. I'd recommend Col. Mustards in particular. A few blocks east of 124th, on 102nd or 103rd Ave (doesn't matter which), is Paul Kane Park, which has a cool water feature in the summer. Nice place to relax in.

- Glenora: this neighbourhood has an array of residential stock. There are many gems from when the neighbourhood was first built in the 1910s and 1920s, particularly around Alexander Circle, but there's also a lot of great mid-century modern in here as well, from the 1930s to the 1970s. Many homes in this leafy neighbourhood have a strong Scottish and Germanic feel to them.

- The River Valley: as mentioned above, this is an expansive network of parks. A great place to take in from a distance and up close. It's amazing to feel right in nature, while the downtown skyscrapers loom above. An oft overlooked Edmonton gem.

- Ada Blvd in the Highlands: similar in appeal to Glenora. Beautiful old mansions. Nearby, you can head into the river valley and cross the 50th St Footbridge for some nice views of Downtown Edmonton.

- The Quarters: this is a neighbourhood in transition immediately east of Downtown. The strip along Jasper Ave from 97th to 96th St boasts some great Edwardian commercial stock, bookended by the flatiron Gibson Block on one end and the modest Goodridge Bldg on the other. On the south side of this block are some great river valley views. Below the Quarters is Louise McKinney Park, which is the most manicured of the river valley parks, which is a nice park to stroll through.

Festivals
Most of Edmonton's festivals are held right Downtown in Churchill Square. Al Fresco and the Pride Parade coincide on the same day, which is a great way to see Edmonton at its finest. Some festivals, while centred at Churchill, have other spots of interest throughout the downtown or the city.

- Cariwest Parade (August)
- Taste of Edmonton (July)
- The Works Art & Design Festival (June)
- Street Performers Festival (July)
- Gay Pride Parade (June)
- Al Fresco (June)
- Whyte Ave Art Walk (July)
- Edmonton Fringe Fest (August)
- Dragon Boat Races (August)
- Heritage Days (August)
- Deep Freeze (January)
- Ice on Whyte (January)
- Edmonton Folk Fest (August)

Miscellaneous
- High Level Bridge Streetcar: operates May-October. Goes across the very top of the High Level Bridge (as opposed to the lower section for vehicles and pedestrians), offering sweeping views of the river valley and Downtown. It ends right outside the Old Strathcona Farmers Market.

- City Market on 104th St: this is the ideal time to see 104th. The street is closed from Jasper to 103rd Ave and just gives the street a great atmosphere. It's held every Saturday from mid-May to early-October.

- Edmonton Queen: neat, affordable riverboat that gives an hour long tour along a stretch of Edmonton's river, the North Saskatchewan.

- Gallagher Park: a simple park, but with some of the best skyline views in the city. During the winter, the place is great for tobogganing down, due to the large hill that makes the park. Every August, the park is host to the Edmonton Folk Festival. Beneath the park is the tiny neighbourhood of Cloverdale, which has some neat residential architecture.

- Muttart Conservatory: if you have a green thumb, this is the place for you. The Muttart has a vivid array of plant species which comes in handy when snow is on the ground. Even if you aren't a botanist, you may still appreciate the pyramid design of the buildings.

- Ride the LRT.
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  #57  
Old Posted May 8, 2013, 12:27 PM
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I think they're running out of ideas now.

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  #58  
Old Posted May 10, 2013, 12:01 PM
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Nevermind. The world loves it.


Australia: Newfoundland Made The Best Tourism Video Ever Of Tiny Goat Riding A Horse

Quote:
Newfoundland created what is quite possibly the best tourism ad of all time.

While filming a commercial for Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism, the crew spotted these two unlikely friends near Cape St. Mary’s Ecological Reserve on the southwestern part of the Avalon Peninsula. Which begs the question, what else would you expect in a place with its very own time zone?

This is even better than Scotland’s January tourism campaign that featured glamour shots of Shetland ponies wearing cardigan sweaters.
http://au.businessinsider.com/newfou...a-horse-2013-5


And from the U.S....

http://jezebel.com/tiny-goat-straigh...-nbd-497515419
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Last edited by SignalHillHiker; May 10, 2013 at 12:21 PM.
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  #59  
Old Posted May 10, 2013, 5:54 PM
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The people behind Destination St. John's:



Love that picture. Willicott's Lane, I assume.

And some of their work:

Video Link
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  #60  
Old Posted May 17, 2013, 5:47 PM
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Quote:
http://www.thestar.com/life/travel/2...o_toronto.html

http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/t....letterbox.jpg

Travel Editor’s Blog: Peggys Cove and Nova Scotia come to Toronto

Published on Thu May 16 2013

Nova Scotia has come to Toronto.

From now until June 9, a 28-foot replica of the world-famous Peggy’s Cove lighthouse is on display at Bay and Wellington in the heart of downtown Toronto; part of a big push by Nova Scotia tourism that also included a series of stories in Star Travel a few weeks ago.

http://ow.ly/i/27rla
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