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  #201  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 7:01 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
NB is unquestionably the least Maritime of the Maritime Provinces.......
There are coastal fishing villages in the Lower North Shore that are way east of Halifax, yet they're not the "East Coast" of Canada due to being in Quebec according to some definitions (which I always found completely nonsensical, for the record).
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  #202  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 7:05 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
NB is unquestionably the least Maritime of the Maritime Provinces.......
Yeah, and places like Matane on the western edge of the Gaspé, and not that far east really, arguably feel more "maritime" than places like Edmundston or Fredericton.
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  #203  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 7:08 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
There are coastal fishing villages in the Lower North Shore that are way east of Halifax, yet they're not the "East Coast" of Canada due to being in Quebec according to some definitions (which I always found completely nonsensical, for the record).
I think what it boils down to is that only NS and NL truly border on the Atlantic Ocean.

NB borders on the Bay of Fundy, Northumberland Strait, Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the Baie des Chaleurs.

Quebec has the Saint Lawrence estuary, the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the Baie des Chaleurs.

For these reasons both QC and NB aren't truly "Maritime".

Curiously though, PEI gets a pass on this. It's boundaries are the Northumberland Strait and Gulf of Saint Lawrence, with no true Atlantic Frontier. Despite this, PEI is universally perceived as being "Maritime". I suppose this is because PEI is an island.........
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  #204  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 7:11 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
There are coastal fishing villages in the Lower North Shore that are way east of Halifax, yet they're not the "East Coast" of Canada due to being in Quebec according to some definitions (which I always found completely nonsensical, for the record).
The definitions typically take into account social factors, though. It's like the whole issue about Manitoba's place in Western Canada... I mean, from a literal perspective you could say that it's Central Canada being dead centre of the country and so far from the west coast and all of that, but it's clear that most people generally look at a broader context than just lines on a map, which is why Manitoba generally gets lumped in with Western Canada.
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  #205  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 7:21 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
I think what it boils down to is that only NS and NL truly border on the Atlantic Ocean.
Depends if your criterion is salty water. If it's the case, then the "East Coast" of Canada is Labrador, the St. Lawrence estuary up to Québec City (the inhabitants call it "la mer"), the Gulf of St. Lawrence (NB, QC, NL, PEI), the Atlantic coast and the bay of Fundy...

That theoritical East Coast would simply be more profoundly "rugged" than the American one.
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  #206  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 7:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Laceoflight View Post
Depends if your criterion is salty water. If it's the case, then the "East Coast" of Canada is Labrador, the St. Lawrence estuary up to Québec City (the inhabitants call it "la mer"), the Gulf of St. Lawrence (NB, QC, NL, PEI), the Atlantic coast and the bay of Fundy...

That theoritical East Coast would simply be more profoundly "rugged" than the American one.
Also, the villages' names highlight that fact - if you compare between all of those named according to French custom of mentioning whatever river they're on (say, St-Jean-sur-Richelieu / St-Denis-sur-Richelieu / etc. vs St-Simon-sur-Mer, etc.)
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  #207  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 7:32 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
... which is why Manitoba generally gets lumped in with Western Canada.
"Eastern seaboard" definitions become quite weird when you realize that grain from the Brandon area and copper from the El Paso area can get shipped across the Atlantic without having to cross a single provincial/state border. Both TX and MB have "Atlantic" seaports.
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  #208  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2017, 3:36 AM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
"Eastern seaboard" definitions become quite weird when you realize that grain from the Brandon area and copper from the El Paso area can get shipped across the Atlantic without having to cross a single provincial/state border. Both TX and MB have "Atlantic" seaports.
Hudson Bay is part of the Arctic Ocean although I have heard some people try to argue that it's part of the Atlantic.

Where I live in Timmins is within the Arctic Watershed. All our lakes and rivers here flow into James Bay which is part of Hudson Bay.
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  #209  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2017, 3:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It's used in Quebec as well, and doesn't just apply to the Gaspésie. The North Shore and Bas-St-Laurent regions at least are in it too.

It's worth noting that the word "maritime" is used more commonly as a non-proper noun in French (ie not in reference to the Canadian Maritime provinces), and it basically means "marine" or "seafaring".

Though the marketing may have a subtle link to the Maritimes as well: the Maritime provinces generally have a good rep in Quebec.
Le Québec Maritime is those regions plus the Magdalen Islands. I've been to all of those regions and they advertise together as being Maritime Quebec. Here is the website for those who may be interested: http://www.quebecmaritime.ca/en/

I do agree that the Maritime provinces have a good reputation with Quebeckers. Part of it is probably because you won't find much anti-French speaking sentiment like you might find in other provinces. Plus, Acadians who speak French make up a good percentage of the population are spread throughout the region so the French language doesn't seem scary and unusual to its residents. Therefore Quebeckers feel more welcome. I would even say that all Atlantic provinces which includes Newfoundland and Labrador are well respected by Quebeckers in general. (And I have to add that Northeastern and Eastern Ontario are well respected as well)

Last edited by Loco101; Sep 13, 2017 at 3:53 AM.
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  #210  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2017, 5:27 AM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
"Eastern seaboard" definitions become quite weird when you realize that grain from the Brandon area and copper from the El Paso area can get shipped across the Atlantic without having to cross a single provincial/state border. Both TX and MB have "Atlantic" seaports.
Just shows that east coast Canadians (such as Ontarians and Quebecois ) have a warped sense of what is east.
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  #211  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2017, 6:08 AM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
There are coastal fishing villages in the Lower North Shore that are way east of Halifax, yet they're not the "East Coast" of Canada due to being in Quebec according to some definitions (which I always found completely nonsensical, for the record).
On the one hand I think this is a reasonable view, but on the other there really are a bunch of distinct regions around the eastern part of Quebec and Atlantic Canada that all feel quite different when you visit them (as different as large areas in Central and Western Canada). Not just due to social differences but also due to differences in the natural environment. Different climate, plants and animals, geology, etc.
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  #212  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2017, 3:42 AM
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Just look at where the town of Blanc-Sablon, Quebec is located in relation to all of Atlantic Canada.
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  #213  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2017, 3:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
Just look at where the town of Blanc-Sablon, Quebec is located in relation to all of Atlantic Canada.
Farther east but also farther north. It's more than 800 km north of the southern tip of the Maritimes. The equivalent from Timmins would be somewhere in Ohio.

It is a somewhat extreme example but all of maritime Quebec is a lot more northern than the southern parts of the Maritimes where most of the people live. They're also much less influenced by the ocean. Nova Scotia and Newfoundland sit out in the ocean whereas Quebec is all very continental in comparison. NB and PEI are somewhere in between.
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  #214  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2017, 3:58 AM
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Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
... but also due to differences in the natural environment. Different climate, plants and animals, geology, etc.
But the same thing is true of both East and West Coasts in the U.S. and likely everywhere else on Earth too. No one ever demanded that a given, single coast has to be homogeneous to be referred to as "The [whatever-side-or-sea-it's-on] Coast".
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