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  #12681  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2019, 5:31 PM
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not for the squeamish

I didn't know we had praying mantis in BC. This was in Kelowna.

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  #12682  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2019, 5:33 PM
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Northern Ontario has praying mantis too, I've only seen one once. They're pretty rare.
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  #12683  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2019, 10:15 PM
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not for the squeamish

I didn't know we had praying mantis in BC. This was in Kelowna.

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I've seen green praying manti (sic) in Kelowna, but never a brown one.

Cool video.
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  #12684  
Old Posted Sep 9, 2019, 3:03 PM
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Saskatchewan Entertainment Expo is this next weekend in Saskatoon.

The list of media guests should be fun for photoOps

I loved Guardians of the Galaxy & looking forward to Fast & Furious 9 with Michael Rooker, I'm neither a Star Wars fanatic or a Trekie but I did love Buffy the Vampire Slayer series & Angel spin off with Amy Acker plus Power Ranger Johnny Yong Bosch before I can even remember.



https://saskatoon.saskexpo.com/
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  #12685  
Old Posted Sep 9, 2019, 3:11 PM
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  #12686  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2019, 11:29 PM
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  #12687  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2019, 8:03 PM
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Aww... very cute article on the anniversary from the Washington Post:



Quote:
In the 847-page Dictionary of Newfoundland English, you can find one phrase for inclement weather (“not fit fer a dog”) and nearly a dozen terms of endearment, including “m’darling,” “ducky” and “trout.” In Canada’s easternmost province, affection trumps storminess.

...

While studying the vocabulary list, I met Susan Rollinson, an audience member whose vernacular rolled off her Newfoundland tongue.

“Newfoundland is a great place to be from,” she said. “We’re all about giving. We take care of people. We’re also curious. ‘Oh, you’re from away?’ Away is a big place.”

After the 100-minute performance, I sought out Susan. She wasn’t hard to find. I spotted her a few rows back, frozen in place, her cheeks glistening with tears.

“I’m so proud,” she said. “That’s my people. That’s what we do. The actors gave dignity to what we stand for: humanity and kindness.”

We exited a side door together, hoping to bump into the actors. We ran into George Masswohl, who played Derm Flynn and Gander mayor Claude Elliott, among other characters. Susan, full of emotion, thanked him for his moving portrayal and complimented him on his accent. I told George I thought the audience was not just applauding the actors, but that they were cheering for Newfoundlanders — and for altruism and empathy. He agreed.

“We take this very seriously,” he said. “We are spreading the message of what they did, with no questions asked.”

...

He told us about a Connecticut family with a baby who were returning from Belgium. The mother was afraid to board a plane, so they traveled home by car and ferry. After the concert, Larry handed me a printout of a letter from the couple.

“Never have we felt so surrounded by warmth and good will as we did during those days following 9/11 in St. John’s,” they wrote. “Actually we feel a little guilty because we had such a good time enjoying the people and learning about the heritage and culture of Newfoundland.”

...

The museum was closing, and Larry likely had some programming and public engaging to do before heading home. Instead, he spent several minutes sketching out an itinerary for us: Signal Hill, Cape Spear and Petty Harbour, fish and chips at Duke of Duckworth, live music at O’Reilly’s. (Of all small-world coincidences: The Flynns’ son owns the pub.) If Larry hadn’t had a full schedule of meetings the next day, I am fairly certain he would have loaded us into his car and taken us around himself. He probably would have packed us lunch, too.

Fortunately, St. John’s is compact and the road signs are in British English, not Newfoundland English. On the drive to the Cape Spear Lighthouse National Historic Site, I spotted a large white shape offshore. Closing in on the object, I experienced a swell of emotion, from dread (Is that Styrofoam?) to elation (No, it’s an iceberg!). I parked and followed a cliffside trail, leaning in as much as possible without tumbling into the Atlantic. A local man and his friend, who had moved to New Brunswick 40 years ago, were critiquing the iceberg.

...

After a snack of Newfoundland specialties, we followed the Flynns in their car to the Derm Flynn River Front Peace Park. It was after 9 p.m., and the sky was still strikingly blue. We entered the park, which the town built with funds donated by the grateful guests. We walked over to a long piece of rusted steel that resembled a whale. The U.S. government and Port Authority of New York and New Jersey had sent a section of the World Trade Center as a thank you gift to Appleton. In true humble fashion, a plaque said that Appleton shares the honor with Gander, Gambo, Glenwood, Lewisporte, Norris Arm and the other communities that cared for the stranded passengers.

“If it happened again,” Derm said, “we’d be ready to respond.”

...

When Bonnie Harris, the center’s manager, heard about the planes idling on the tarmac, she asked airport officials if any pets were onboard. The response was no. She didn’t accept the answer and persisted. She eventually discovered 19 animals, including two bonobo chimpanzees, in the cargo hold. She and several volunteers set to work, crawling into the tight, dark space to clean the crates and feed the animals. She soon received permission to move her charges to a hangar on airport grounds. In the musical, Bonnie learns that one of the chimps was pregnant and lost her baby. This is true, as was the birth of a healthy baby bonobo two years later by the same mom. The Columbus Zoo named him Gander.

...

Beulah handed me my certification and a card that stated that I was an honorary Newfoundlander.

I have visited some of the most monumental sites on the planet, including the pyramids in Egypt, Angkor Wat in Cambodia and Borobudur in Indonesia. I have ridden a reindeer in Mongolia, drunk beer with members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces in Colombia and chatted up the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala, India. All of these experiences have wowed me. Only Gander, which has neither world-renowned landmarks nor wondrous natural attractions, has moved me.

I asked Oz what were my responsibilities. “It’s not that you should come back,” he said. “Now you have to come back. You are family.”

As a newly minted emissary of kindness, I had a sacred tradition to uphold. With Todd the Cod as my witness, I wouldn’t let my family down.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...&noredirect=on
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  #12688  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 5:52 AM
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Almost 20% of young Canadian homebuyers commit mortgage fraud: survey

Many homebuyers between the ages of 25 and 34 inflate income on mortgage applications, and nearly a quarter think that’s OK, finds Equifax

By Joannah Connolly, Glacier Media Real Estate | September 11, 2019

With the mortgage stress test stressing out homebuyers across Canada, many are resorting to mortgage fraud in order to qualify for the home they want — especially young buyers between the ages of 25 and 34, according to new survey results from Equifax.

Around one in five (19%) of young homebuyers responding to the survey admitted to inflating their annual income on their mortgage application. And nearly 23% said they think this is an acceptable course of action in today’s mortgage climate — nearly double the 12% of all respondents who agreed this was OK.

...

https://biv.com/article/2019/09/almo...r3W-hI6mYHkQ1w
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  #12689  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 6:17 AM
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ugh

'There must be a nest': B.C. expert says invasive giant hornets have a home on Vancouver Island

News staff, CTV Vancouver Island
Published Thursday, September 12, 2019




The B.C. government's resident bee expert says three Asian giant hornets found in Nanaimo this summer likely aren’t the only ones on Vancouver Island.

The dangerous invasive species was discovered on the island in August but only revealed by the Ministry of Agriculture on Wednesday.

...

"The fact that there are three proves there must be a nest."

The Asian hornets are thought to have likely travelled to the island in a shipping container. The four-centimetre-long hornets may pose a public health risk, said Van Westendorp.

"The amount of venom a person will get may well threaten their health, may well threaten their well-being," he said.

In 2013, 41 people in China were killed and 1,600 were injured when the predatory pests plagued the province of Shaanxi.

The hornets are native to East Asia, and the climate on Vancouver Island probably feels like home, Van Westendorp said.

"It can probably adapt to our environment very readily without any problems."

The apiarist said that hornets are currently entering their dormancy period, meaning they likely won't pose any threat until spring.

However, anyone who thinks they've spotted one of the invasive thumb-sized hornets is asked to report it immediately.

...

https://vancouverisland.ctvnews.ca/t...land-1.4591090
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  #12690  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 6:44 AM
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Originally Posted by giallo View Post
I've seen green praying manti (sic) in Kelowna, but never a brown one.

Cool video.
The brown one is native and the green one is invasive in the Okanagan and surrounding southern interior valleys. (or it could be the other way around...)

Not a typical Canadian thought of seeing a praying manti and black widow spider duke it out.

Should be of no surprise that the majority of more "exotic" species in Canada for insects / amphibians / reptiles are in the southern BC interior valleys and southern Ontario.

Also sucks to hear about the east Asian giant hornet making its home on the BC coast.
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  #12691  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 1:26 PM
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This one made me smile.

We met the Ontario couple on a Monday, and six days later, played at their reception



Quote:
Neil Hyde and I arrived in Port Rexton on Labour Day. We drove up to our rental property — a charming, three-bedroom saltbox home — and dropped our bags, before wandering down the road to the local brewery.

The late afternoon rays were beaming, and we raised and clinked our mason jars of IPA on the outdoor patio.

The Port Rexton Brewery is an interesting place, where tourists and locals alike convene, and happily chat about the area: what they've done, where they've been, and where they're going next.

The first question I overheard the bartender ask every time he poured up a glass for a new patron: "Where are you from?"

While my answer was, "Oh, we're just in from St. John's," others that night were from all over: Ontario, Quebec — even Virginia.

When the sun started to disappear, we moved indoors to a long table, where two women later joined us.

Kara McLean and Carly Pettinger were visiting from Kitchener-Waterloo, and had just gotten to Port Rexton from Gros Morne, as part of their pre-wedding adventures. The pair were set to tie the knot at another brewhouse — the Quidi Vidi Brewery in St. John's — six days later.

Kara completed her master's degree at Memorial University in 2015, and had fallen in love with Newfoundland.

And a year later, she fell in love with Carly.

They met while on the job — in the office of an NDP member of the Ontario legislature. Over time, their love blossomed, and now, after three years together, they were about to walk down the aisle.

We bonded over pints, laughing while talking about politics, where we worked, and where we'd been on our respective trips.

As we parted ways for the evening, we made plans to meet back at the brewery the following night.

Excursion around the bay
Neil and I had just finished an epic Scrabble game, when we spotted Kara and Carly walk into the bar.

"Well hello, friends!" I shouted.

They had two other people in tow — another couple from Ontario, who were in town for the wedding. The friends asked how long had we known Kara and Carly, and we replied, "Oh, we met last night!"

That's when we chatted about how quickly we'd jelled, and how, after they'd left the brewery that first night, were wondering if it would be weird to invite us to their impending nuptials.

Of course, we said we would be there with bells on.

Our conversations continued. It was a rainy evening, and the pub was mostly empty, so we all encouraged Neil to take out his guitar to play a few tunes.

That's when we told Kara, Carly, and their friends about (shameless plug alert) our band, Tomorrow's Hangover.

Point blank, Kara said: "Will you play at the wedding?! Seriously. Whatever songs you want, for however long you want."

...

On Sunday, Sept. 8 — six days after we met — Neil and I were part of the Newfoundland contingent (that you could count on two hands) of wedding guests, with about 70 people from Ontario and beyond.

I barely knew these women, yet I was so touched to hear all of the beautiful speeches delivered by family, friends, and colleagues: how Kara's quiet and serious personality was the yin to Carly's yang, a wild and carefree spirit, who lives life to the fullest. (And, I'd learned first-hand, often documents it in selfies.)

It was such an honour to be a part of their story: the MCs noting, how typical it was of Kara and Carly, that of course they would randomly meet people at a brewery while vacationing in Newfoundland, and days later, not only invite them to their wedding — but also ask them to provide the musical entertainment.

The brides continually voiced their gratitude — but so too did many of the wedding guests. "It made their night," one woman told me.

The privilege was not lost on me. What a special thing to have happen — for all of us.

It strangely feels like our paths were meant to cross. And it's not lost on me that very rarely do you meet people who you feel comfortable enough to attend their wedding a few days later and not feel completely out of place.

So, in pure brewery and wedding fashion, I raise my proverbial cup: Cheers to the happy couple, to years of love and laughter — and to more epic adventures.

And next time, we'll meet in your home province!
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfo...hers-1.5280750
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  #12692  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 1:41 PM
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My God, great day for news!

I'll definitely be checking this one out.

How a powerful new exhibit in St. John’s is going to start arguments



Quote:
It starts with Joey Smallwood’s chair.

No ordinary chair, as you might imagine. It’s hand-crafted, and upholstered in seal leather. The very place where the man himself used to park his rear end for cabinet meetings.

This summer, Joey’s chair greets visitors to Future Possible: Newfoundland and Labrador Art from 1949 to the Present, a powerful exhibit at The Rooms in St. John’s.

“I wanted the seat of power to greet you as soon as you enter,” said curator Mireille Eagan, who conceived and assembled the exhibit.

The seat of power does not go unchallenged.

From across the gallery, a craggy face frowns from its place atop a small bronze sculpture by Luben Boykov. It’s the face of Grace Sparkes, the passionate anti-Confederate and lifelong enemy of Smallwood.

Sparkes was known to call Smallwood “Little Batista,” after Fulgencio Batista, the ruthless dictator who ruled Cuba before Castro’s revolution.

Their silent standoff is a fitting welcome to the gallery, because Future Possible is an argument starter.

Through more than 60 artifacts and artworks spanning 70 years, the exhibit takes a fresh crack at questions Newfoundland and Labrador has been grappling with for at least that long.

...

Seventy years into Confederation, this is not where Canada’s youngest province hoped to be: facing grim economic prospects, a growing list of seemingly intractable problems, and what feels very much like a crisis of confidence. There have been calls for fresh ideas and new approaches in government. But our elected leaders appear to be stuck in the past, practising politics as a form of tribal warfare and empire building.

Politicians are a product of the community and culture they come from. They won’t challenge their entrenched beliefs until the rest of us do.

Consider, for example, our cherished connection to the land and sea.

Around the corner from Joey’s chair hangs a set of paintings that capture the terror and wonder of the natural world, as rendered by celebrated artists like Frank Lapointe and David Blackwood. For many, that bond with the rocks, trees, and water goes to the heart of what it means to live here.

But the most stunning landscape in the show is Kym Greeley’s vision of the Witless Bay overpass, an asphalt loop drenched in a honey glow reminiscent of an autumn sunset.

Nearby, a Christopher Pratt painting shows the grey concrete of a ruined American military building in Placentia Bay, rising from the earth like it’s been there since the continents formed.

In the midst of it all stands an imposing model of the Hibernia platform, and on the next wall, a painting by Mary Ann Penashue pictures an equally imposing single-engine airplane. The aircraft dominates the snowy Labrador landscape, and dwarfs the Indigenous people waiting to board it.

Taken together, these pieces point to alternative versions of our great, ongoing romance with the land and sea. What if that romance is just a convenient bit of propaganda, handed down to justify the claiming, renaming, and continued exploitation of the territory?

In one of the exhibit’s video installations, D’arcy Wilson plays a character she calls Nature’s No. 1 Fan, traipsing through the wilderness, shouting “I love you!” into the void. Nature does not reply.

“Everyone has an idea of what a place should look like,” said Eagan. “But what is the true experience, and what are the stories we lay upon it?”

...

At every turn, Future Possible messes with familiar and expected images. A giant woman towers over the historic streets of downtown St. John’s. A worn-out trap net is coiled into art. The sinking of the Ocean Ranger is mourned not as an epic industrial disaster, but as a domestic tragedy, leaving ordinary lives shattered in kitchens and living rooms.

The youngest artists in this show have no recollection of the Smallwood era, and the cozy comforts of a handcrafted sealskin throne are not available to them. They’re uneasy, still looking for a version of Newfoundland and Labrador where they belong.

Daze Jeffries frames digital images of items collected on a beach she has known all her life. In an accompanying statement, she recalls childhood dreams of jumping from a beach cliff into the cold harbour water. It could be a sweet outport memory, evoking the contentment of a simpler time and simple place. But for the artist, the dream lingers as a precursor to “my own gender transition as a rural islander.”

Another outport upbringing is recalled in a ceramic sculpture by Daniel Rumboldt. It might be taken for a bird, or maybe a large, exotic seashell, a tribute to the saltwater joys of home. But to the artist, it speaks to his escape from the Great Northern Peninsula, where “I often felt misplaced and outcast due to being queer and being the ‘artist type.’”

“I wanted to tell as much of a varied story as possible,” said Eagan. “With different histories and generations and regions, and different ways of growing up.”

“It’s impossible to write a complete history. So this is just a launching point. I want people to talk about the show, to argue with me, and argue with the works.”

Can a collection of pictures, objects, and artifacts help us talk about where Newfoundland and Labrador goes from here? Eagan acknowledges that art, especially modern art, gets little more than a shrug from many.

“A lot of people look at artworks and they think, this is absolutely absurd.”

But then, Newfoundland and Labrador knows absurdity. The place is famous for it.

...
https://newsinteractives.cbc.ca/longform/joeys-chair
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  #12693  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 5:02 PM
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Originally Posted by SpongeG View Post
Almost 20% of young Canadian homebuyers commit mortgage fraud: survey

Many homebuyers between the ages of 25 and 34 inflate income on mortgage applications, and nearly a quarter think that’s OK, finds Equifax

By Joannah Connolly, Glacier Media Real Estate | September 11, 2019

With the mortgage stress test stressing out homebuyers across Canada, many are resorting to mortgage fraud in order to qualify for the home they want — especially young buyers between the ages of 25 and 34, according to new survey results from Equifax.

Around one in five (19%) of young homebuyers responding to the survey admitted to inflating their annual income on their mortgage application. And nearly 23% said they think this is an acceptable course of action in today’s mortgage climate — nearly double the 12% of all respondents who agreed this was OK.

...

https://biv.com/article/2019/09/almo...r3W-hI6mYHkQ1w
Regardless of the potential implications on a macro scale (if any), I don't really see any moral or ethical qualms about fudging financial figures in the struggle to buy a home in the current climate. It's a little white lie.
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  #12694  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 5:17 PM
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Regardless of the potential implications on a macro scale (if any), I don't really see any moral or ethical qualms about fudging financial figures in the struggle to buy a home in the current climate. It's a little white lie.
If the bank is dumb enough to take on a mortgage without doing their due diligence, they deserve what they get.

If a person is dumb enough to take on a huge mortgage without assessing their finances realistically, they deserve what they get.

The scary bit is when you do this at a macro level, you end up like the US in 2008.

That being said, I maintain that the financial institutions that originate the loan should be stuck with their idiocy and not allowed to hand them off to someone else.
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  #12695  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 7:42 PM
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I brought my T4 to the bank for my mortgage pre-approval and they didn't bother to look at it.
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Old Posted Sep 19, 2019, 4:40 PM
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Old Posted Sep 19, 2019, 4:44 PM
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I brought my T4 to the bank for my mortgage pre-approval and they didn't bother to look at it.
It is laughable how easy it is to get a mortgage pre-approval from a bank. One could inflate their income considerably and still be pre-approved. Of course they will get in trouble once the underwriters look at the file more carefully.
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  #12698  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2019, 12:53 AM
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He posted this in our Facebook group chat a few days ago and the general consensus was "Who the fuck are you? We don't give a shit." (To the Great Big Sea guy, who is the subject of that article).

I never turn down an opportunity to share how much I can't stand Great Big Sea. I would honestly rather listen to Nickelback.
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Old Posted Sep 20, 2019, 5:28 AM
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Allarco Entertainment launches lawsuit against four major Canadian retailers for promoting content piracy

NEWS PROVIDED BY
Super Channel
Sep 16, 2019


EDMONTON, Sept. 16, 2019 /CNW/ - Super Channel President and CEO, Don McDonald, today announced that Allarco Entertainment 2008 Inc., has stepped to the forefront in the war against content piracy by launching a lawsuit against four major Canadian retailers complicit in the promotion of the downloading and streaming of illegal content on internet streaming devices ("Pirate Devices") sold to customers in their stores.

The lawsuit comes after a 19-month undercover investigation carried out coast-to-coast, of in-store practices by sales personnel, including supervisors and managers, in Best Buy, Staples, Canada Computers, and London Drugs retail outlets, with over 100 hours of audio and video recorded surveillance, documenting 150 events supporting the claim.

...

https://www.newswire.ca/news-release...802194144.html
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Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 3:53 AM
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I always laugh when a person or company explains something is cross Canada by saying "from the Rockies to the Maritimes". This includes less than 5% of BC residents haha!
And saying "from the Maritimes to the Rockies" includes none of us.
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