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  #15181  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2019, 2:47 PM
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Last edited by CityTech; Sep 20, 2019 at 3:10 PM.
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  #15182  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2019, 5:03 PM
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Originally Posted by rotten42 View Post
No...it has been happening. I've been working with several companies of this size relocate offices here over the last 5 years. There are a lot more technology companies in Calgary then people realise.
Yayy! I was sure I've posted about several moving or expanding here just in the past couple years. Validation
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  #15183  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2019, 6:10 PM
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Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
Realistically, it isn't coming to an end at all. Consumption is still going up year over year while reserves of a finite resource go down.
Yes I know consumption is continuing to go up but as I provided stats months ago, it is forecast to plateau by about 2023 and begin a slow decline of about 10% by 2030 and then drop rather precipitously till 2040 and then go into freefall. This is due to the very fast development of battery and hydrogen technology and governments {both rich and poor} putting strict guidelines on phase out times for fuel transportation and power production.

As for low prices now, those will only decline over the long-term due to the above.. Hell, prices are already low despite having one of the largest producers on the planet, Venezuela, having production come to a complete halt. When Venezuela eventually gets rid of Maduro, the first priority for the country will be to get that oil production up and running again to bring in much needed foreign reserves and tax revenue causing even more product to hit the market during a time of falling demand.

All fossil fuels are living on borrowed time and it's time for Canada {and Alberta especially} to face that economic reality because that time is very quickly approaching whether Canada likes it or not.
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  #15184  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2019, 6:34 PM
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Originally Posted by rotten42 View Post
No...it has been happening. I've been working with several companies of this size relocate offices here over the last 5 years. There are a lot more technology companies in Calgary then people realise.
Honestly who?

We track this stuff pretty closely to fill our buildings and I can't think of a singe tenant of this magnitude relocating or expanding downtown at all.

I'm happy to be proven wrong but 50,000 sq ft tech tenants who actually employ people have not exactly been flocking to Calgary lately, much to our distress.
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  #15185  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2019, 6:53 PM
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Originally Posted by SpongeG View Post
Alberta's 'Gas City' to shut down 2,000 wells, laying off up to 100 people

Medicine Hat loses more than $30 million a year due to plunging natural gas prices

Jennifer Dorozio · CBC News · Posted: Sep 17, 2019

The southern Alberta community of Medicine Hat — known as "The Gas City" — is permanently shuttering 2,000 of its active natural gas wells due to extremely low prices, resulting in layoffs for about 100 people.

The decision to close 75 per cent of the city's wells was announced last Wednesday and formalized Monday evening. Medicine Hat Mayor Ted Clugston said the difficult choice was a long time in the making.

"This didn't happen overnight," Clugston said on the Calgary Eyeopener.

"We've been actually talking about a strategy going forward for 10 years now since I've been on city council, when the prices basically went into the tank in 2008-2009."

Clugston said that the continual plunge in natural gas prices has caused the city to lose money at the rate of $30-35 million a year.

...

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calga...f5hVy8hr2uV_cM
The fact they are permanently abandoning these wells is troubling. Troubling in the sense it conveys the terrible condition the Alberta natural gas industry is in as a whole and the pessimism that it will improve. City of Med Hat clearly feels it is a permanent thing and not worth simply suspending the wells so they can be brought back online in better conditions.
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  #15186  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2019, 8:44 PM
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By "abandoning", I assume it is meant that they will be properly decommissioned, including any and all remediation and ongoing monitoring? Right?
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  #15187  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2019, 9:30 PM
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RE the Calgary tech 3.5 million story.

I was reading the comments on a CBC story and on the facebook comments section and people are so stupid omg.

One person was like why are we giving them $3.5 million for min wage jobs, just use that money to open more McDonalds to create jobs.

Or people saying it should be going into oil, or tech jobs are useless etc.

The strong is stupid. lol.
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  #15188  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2019, 9:56 PM
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Never, NEVER read the comments.

You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy
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  #15189  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2019, 6:26 PM
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^^ so, "we must be cautious".
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  #15190  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2019, 11:01 PM
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Since we're talking tech, this was in the Globe & Mail this week:

Canada is pushing its tech sector into a race to the bottom
When the country sells itself as a purveyor of cheap tech labour instead of a leader of global innovation, colonialism is the inevitable result

It’s impossible to pinpoint exactly when Canada’s policy-makers started positioning the country as a cheap labour pool for multibillion-dollar foreign tech companies, but we know when it went mainstream: Amazon HQ2.

In September, 2017, Seattle-based Amazon launched a continentwide search for a city to host its second headquarters. From Wilmington, Del., to Winnipeg to Woonsocket, R.I., towns, cities and regions from across North America – a staggering 238 to be exact, though unsurprising given the stakes – put forward proposals outlining why they should become the e-commerce giant’s new home.

While competing U.S. cities offered tax breaks, infrastructure improvements and expedited construction approvals, Ed Clark, Canada’s official representative, openly boasted that “our competitive advantage” is “software programmers that cost 34 per cent to 38 per cent less than in U.S.,” vowing “that’s an edge the government is determined not only to maintain but to sharpen.” In the end, 20 finalists were announced, with Toronto being the lone – and ultimately unsuccessful – Canadian contender.

Two years later, this goal to actively drive down wages still lives in a dubious inventory of taxpayer-funded marketing materials that repeatedly highlight the cheap salaries of “high-quality” Canadian tech talent and the substantial tax incentives or taxpayer subsidies that await those who open tech branch plants in Canada. These misguided strategies put our tech workers in a global wage race to the bottom, competing on cost with the salaries in Poland, Ukraine and India. They are just daring our top talent to leave the country – and research shows that 66 per cent of our software engineering graduates have already left.

Frequent talk of innovation by the federal government over the past four years did not result in a national innovation strategy – a road map of policies to see Canada prosper in knowledge-based and data-driven economies. An ad hoc set of programs was introduced to appease the domestic tech sector, but a strategic approach to commercializing Canadian intellectual property (IP) and data was pushed aside in favour of a feverish pursuit of jobs, establishing Canada as a prominent hub of highly skilled but cheap tech branch plants.

The Trudeau government is not the first to misunderstand what an innovation strategy actually entails. The previous Conservative government under Stephen Harper confused a science and technology strategy with an innovation strategy, as they principally focused on building research capacity at universities by increasing their R&D funding...

...The impact of big tech on smaller firms is the stuff of tech sector legend, starting with Microsoft’s strategy to “embrace, extend and extinguish” smaller companies. Sometimes small companies are acquired for the complementary technology, but often they are bought to shut them down and pre-empt possible competition. “Today’s giants are much more ruthless and introspective. They will eat their own children to live another day,” a prominent venture capitalist Matt Ocko told The Economist last year.

Instead of growing local technology ecosystems, they access highly skilled talent, intimidate startups into terms of a sale, threatening to put young entrepreneurs out of business by making their service a free feature. They have tons of data to identify emerging rivals faster than ever before. Venture capitalists dodge spaces where tech giants might step, referring to “kill zones” as sectors where they won’t invest because tech giants have entered that space.

Facebook famously copied Snap’s features. Amazon labels many startups as “partners,” only to copy their functionality and offer them for free. Google purchased a promising Waterloo-based startup called BufferBox, took its IP to HQ and then shut it down. Huawei creates “partnerships” with Canadian universities where taxpayer-funded professors transfer critical IP to China. The French firm Ubisoft gets up to 37 per cent of its Montreal work-force costs subsidized by Quebec taxpayers. Branch plant engineers register IP created in Canada and transfer it to HQ, where it’s commercialized and taxed.

While predatory on the surface, these actions reflect the nature and structure of the IP and data-driven economy, where markets are prone to concentration. High rent extraction and abusive power are rampant because global value chains are inherently unstable.

Yet Canada is courting big tech giants inside our largest incubators, creating our very own “kill zones” and turning them against our promising young companies. Using outdated, traditional economy logic, the federal government’s Advisory Council of Economic Growth recommended that we double down on courting foreign tech with incentives and cheap labour in the hope of spurring Canadian innovation – without any evidence of how this would affect domestic innovators or develop Canada’s competitiveness...


https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opin...to-the-bottom/
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  #15191  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 3:26 AM
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Enbridge planning $2.5B new gas plant, pipeline in B.C.

By Deborah Jaremko |Sept. 13, 2019

Enbridge has started the regulatory process for a new natural gas liquids extraction plant (or “straddle plant”) and associated pipeline in Northeast B.C. with a projected capital cost of $2.5 billion.

The company filed an application for the Frontier Project with the B.C. Environmental Assessment Office in August.

It would be B.C.’s second straddle plant; whereas there are eight in Alberta, noted GMP FirstEnergy analyst Ian Gillies.

The plant will be located near Chetwynd, B.C. and is expected to have an initial capacity of 1.0-1.5 bcf/d, he wrote in a research note.

...

https://www.jwnenergy.com/article/20...t-pipeline-bc/
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  #15192  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 3:29 AM
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As jobs evaporate, some B.C. resource towns look to tourism. But the transition is no vacation

By Jeremy Nuttall Star Vancouver
Mon., Sept. 23, 2019


VANCOUVER—Mitch Vik says it’s easy to see people have lost the spring in their step when they come into his hobby store.

Recently layoffs at local mills in Quesnel, central British Columbia and the closure of another have darkened the day in the small city and its surrounding area of about 23,000 people. Earlier this year 150 people lost their jobs when the Tolko mill shuttered.

“It’s been a hard summer,” Vik says. “You can see the change in people’s moods right from the street level.”

Across the province small shops like Vik’s are likely seeing the same dour manner on their customers’ faces as mills suspend activities or outright close while the lumber market batters the industry, taking 6,000 jobs. Worse yet, the question of what comes next for workers in resource towns when layoffs hit is flumoxing desperate locals.

In some places tourism is the answer, but it’s an unlikely scenario in some of B.C.’s more remote places. Experts caution it’s easy to tout tech as an economic replacement but harder to actually employ former mill workers and lumberjacks in an industry requiring specialized education at post secondary schools in cities far away from sawdust and green chains.

...

https://www.thestar.com/vancouver/20...ust-cycle.html
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  #15193  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 4:53 AM
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Layoffs are much more severe in smaller towns than larger layoffs in cities. Often these towns have the one economy that props up the whole town wheras the city would always have other industries as well as being regional centres for government and commercial services. The larger cities would have far better air/road connections and post-secondary to retrain those workers and again the only alternative for the people in the small town is to move away.

The situation is even worse when we are talking small town layoffs in the resource sector. This is due to resource towns also being much more socially and geographically isolated. If the auto plant in Ingersol was to shut down it would be painful for the town by those people could still be able to get jobs or retraining in nearby London so could remain in Ingersol. The layoff in Quesnel however are the exact opposite. Quesnel is in the middle of no where and within commuting distance of nothing so commuting to another town/city for work or retraining is not optional.
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  #15194  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 1:34 PM
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Originally Posted by LeftCoaster View Post
Honestly who?

We track this stuff pretty closely to fill our buildings and I can't think of a singe tenant of this magnitude relocating or expanding downtown at all.

I'm happy to be proven wrong but 50,000 sq ft tech tenants who actually employ people have not exactly been flocking to Calgary lately, much to our distress.
You can doubt it all you like. I'm employed because of such moves like this.
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  #15195  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 1:42 PM
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But specifically who? Which tech companies have made similar scale investments? We are doubting it, because we have not seen evidence and would be happy to be proved wrong.
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  #15196  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 4:02 PM
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Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
But specifically who? Which tech companies have made similar scale investments? We are doubting it, because we have not seen evidence and would be happy to be proved wrong.

I have disclosure agreements that I won't mess with. One of the firms works with wireless technology for the government of Canada. Had to pass a background check to be able to work on their project.
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  #15197  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 6:12 PM
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I have disclosure agreements that I won't mess with. One of the firms works with wireless technology for the government of Canada. Had to pass a background check to be able to work on their project.
So several companies over the past five years, but not a single one you can name? How are they all so top secret? How do they even hire the hundreds of people they would need if no one knows they exist?

Thing is I also work in an industry that involves knowing who is demanding office space, how much, and for when and I can't think of a single employing tech firm other than finger food, a fringe player from suburban Vancouver, that has required anywhere near this much space for a relocation or expansion.

I don't know why you guys feel the need to knock down good news like this by saying it happens all the time and is no big deal. It doesn't, and that's why this was big news.
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  #15198  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 6:17 PM
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BC wins injunction in Federal court rules against Alberta's "turn off the taps" legislation:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...nded-1.5295354
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  #15199  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 6:45 PM
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BC winning the injunction is the wrong decision and clearly political in nature.

If Alberta cannot turn off the taps due to hurting BC then why can BC stop TM when it will hurt Alberta? BC has decided that Alberta HAS to sell it's oil to BC but BC has also categorically decided Alberta isn't allowed to sell it to anyone else. If turning off the taps will hurt BC then why is BC allowed to continue to expand it's natural gas which will clearly hurt the entire planet?

I have {finally} come to the conclusion that I don't support TM but this kind of hypocrisy really is nauseating and offensive. BC wants it both ways and unfortunately this clearly political decision guarantees they do. This decision will piss off Albertans and they certainly have the right to be. If I was an Albertan I would be infuriated.
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  #15200  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 8:26 PM
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BC wins injunction in Federal court rules against Alberta's "turn off the taps" legislation
Hey, look. Posted in April:

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Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
There's the question of what happens if oil shipments from BC to Alberta top but there's also the question of whether or not this is something Alberta can enforce in the first place.

Alberta probably doesn't have jurisdiction to do this. The Province of Alberta does not own these operations and they don't unilaterally control interprovincial trade. If they tried to stop oil shipments to BC, BC could file an injunction in federal court and the court would very likely side with them.

The "shut off the taps" saber-rattling is mostly a theatrical performance for the Albertan voter audience, not a plausible or useful plan of action.
Aside from the effect on Albert provincial politics, this must have been a negative for Alberta. The legislation was ineffective but BC has been given more of an incentive to switch away from Albertan energy and less of an incentive to work with Alberta to facilitate shipment to tidewater.

It's a legitimate concern that oil and gas shipments often come from unreliable jurisdictions (IMO the resource itself and the power and easy money that come with it have a corrupting influence) and are easily subject to centralized control. The switch to a more decentralized system based on renewables and improved storage brings not just big environmental wins but also big political wins.
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