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  #641  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2019, 10:38 PM
NikolasM NikolasM is offline
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Thanks for the pic. Definitely looks like it is currently framed to the 'yellow' line.
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  #642  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2019, 10:10 AM
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Update - Salt Lake City International


Quote:
Originally Posted by airhero View Post

I noticed a building permit application was submitted for phase 2 of the north concourse construction. I didn't see any news on this so I wondered if they were going to continue building the rest of the concourse (all the way to the red line), or just the rest of the blue portion (to the orange line), if anybody knows. Currently it is framed out to about where the yellow line is. I'd imagine they are doing to the orange line as many gates would be inaccessible if the built to the red line.
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulcapn View Post
If i remember the plans right, they will decommission the 6-8 ish gates at the north end of existing concourse D, and then begin construction on the section between your Yellow and Orange Line. I don't think anyone expects active construction on the "future Phase" section of the new north concourse until after they are well under way on building the east side of the main terminal, and they demo the remainder of the old concourses.


https://i.imgur.com/kMQe6zu.png

Here's a picture of what is currently constructed.


https://i.imgur.com/ELgXD8S.png

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Last edited by delts145; Jul 19, 2019 at 4:12 PM.
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  #643  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2019, 6:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
Here's a picture of what is currently constructed.


https://i.imgur.com/ELgXD8S.png[/CENTER]

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It's really coming along nicely. Keep doing it!
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  #644  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 12:46 PM
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Global study says Salt Lake City is a rare place where traffic congestion is decreasing as population booms

Lee Davidson - The Salt Lake Tribune - https://www.sltrib.com/news/politics...udy-says-salt/


https://archive.sltrib.com/images/20...a_041416~0.jpg


A new global study about traffic congestion says the Salt Lake City metro area is one of the few places in North America making significant improvement, and it could serve as a model for others.

“We’ve been pleased to uncover some positive developments in cities like Portland, Oregon, and Salt Lake City, which might serve as examples for other cities,” said Nick Cohn, senior traffic expert for TomTom, a Netherlands-based navigation software company.

It just released its annual TomTom Traffic Index with statistics about congestion in 403 cities across 56 countries, gleaned from travelers who use its navigation systems.


It found that congestion is getting worse or is stable in 75% of the cities it studied worldwide.

Among the 93 large North American cities or metro areas that it evaluated, 17 saw congestion drop last year — and the Salt Lake City area had the second-best decrease, even amid its rapid population growth.

TomTom figures Salt Lake City area drivers spend an extra 17% of their driving time stuck in traffic, down from 19% the previous year.

The 2 percentage point drop was tied with New Haven, Conn., for second-best in North America, behind only the 3 percentage point drop in Portland, Ore.

The study says Salt Lake City, Portland and New Haven improved for similar reasons: sophisticated traffic light optimization, expanded bike lanes and rental possibilities, and better transit options.


“It’s a big accomplishment with all the growth you’ve been having to have a slight decrease” annually in congestion, Cohn said in a telephone interview. “There are a lot of good things happening to at least handle the growth.”

For example, he praises work by the Utah Department of Transportation that developed a first-in-the-nation system to better coordinate signals throughout the area — better allowing groups of vehicles to move together through lights that switch green just at the right moments. It became a hot topic at national conventions and drew visits from officials in other states hoping to copy it.

“Almost all of the signals are connected" in one system, he noted. "There’s been a lot of innovative work optimizing the signals so that wait times are really reduced and the whole system is really working together as much as possible. So I think that’s certainly had an effect in Salt Lake.”

“Cycling facilities have been getting better. It’s hard to prove that that actually immediately reduces traffic congestion," Cohn said. But in cities where congestion is decreasing, “it’s basically where there are options for the public to make trips in different ways.”

He also notes that in recent years, the Utah Transit Authority expanded its TRAX light rail and FrontRunner commuter rail systems. Salt Lake City also is using its taxes to contract with UTA to increase bus system offerings beginning in August — again adding more options to reduce congestion and pollution.

The study liked some UDOT innovations seeking to handle congestion, making note of its recent “flex lanes” on 5400 South between Redwood Road and Bangerter Highway. They accommodate heavy rush-hour traffic by reversing the direction of some lanes during the day.

“The Salt Lake area, but also Utah in general, has been really innovative for a number of things relating to traffic,” Cohn said.

For the record, Los Angeles had the worst traffic congestion in the United States — with drivers adding 41% extra travel time to commutes while stuck in traffic. The other most congested U.S. cities were New York City (36%); San Francisco (34%); San Jose, Calif. (32%); and Seattle (31%).

Worldwide, the worst congestion was in Mumbai, India (65%); Bogota, Colombia (63%); and 58% each in Lima, Peru, New Delhi, India, and Moscow, Russia.

Ralf-Peter Schaefer, TomTom vice president of traffic information, said, “Globally, traffic congestion is rising. And that’s both good and bad news. It’s good because traffic increases often indicate a strong economy, but the flip side is drivers wasting time sitting in traffic, not to mention the huge environmental impact.”

He said his company and its products allow drivers to make smarter choices in planning routes and avoiding congestion.

“We’re working towards a future where vehicles are electric, shared and autonomous so that our future really is free of congestion and emissions,” Schaefer said. “We have the technology to make this future happen, but it takes a collaborative effort.”

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Last edited by delts145; Jun 22, 2019 at 2:14 PM.
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  #645  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 12:52 PM
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Update - Salt Lake City International





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  #646  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2019, 11:26 AM
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Why building new airports like Salt Lake City's is rare, and what it might mean for your travel plans


By Amanda Olsen, for the Deseret News - https://www.deseretnews.com/article/...york-city.html

SALT LAKE CITY — The Salt Lake City airport isn't the only one remodeling, but it's unusual in opting for a total rebuild.

Construction projects are planned for more than 50 U.S. airports and could cost up to $70 billion through 2021, according to Architectural Record.

As major airports have reached their limit of quick fixes for modernizing outdated facilities, they now have to begin major redesigns, T.J. Schulz, president of the Airports Consultants Council, told the Record.

With America settling into the summer season of travel, the stakes are high for airports — many of which were built decades ago — to accommodate the increasing numbers of globetrotters and air commuters. Cities and airline industries feel this pressure, too, and while cost is a very real deterrent for these revamping projects, failing to engage in them also risks a substantial loss of business.

Salt Lake City’s international airport, slated to open in 2020, “will be the only truly new 21st-century airport in the U.S.,” Bill Wyatt, executive director of Salt Lake City’s Department of Airports, previously told the Deseret News. The last newly constructed U.S. airport was opened in Denver in 1995.

The Salt Lake City airport’s construction project is the product of a 10-year, over-$3 billion redevelopment plan paid for by the airport’s “self-sustaining fund” and uses no taxpayer dollars, the Deseret News reported.

In addition to this funding, the airport received a $14 million grant from the Federal Aviation Association’s Airport Improvement Program (AIP) for runway-related construction according to an FAA announcement last week.

It's just one example of the struggle to pay for the mammoth projects that airport construction inevitably become. As you pass through the inevitable airport reconstruction and deal with the resulting travel delays expected this summer, you may have extra time to wonder how it's all being paid for and why airport remodels happen the way they do. We have some answers...



Salt Lake City Department of Airports finishes a topping out ceremony on the North Concourse of the Salt Lake City International Airport reconstruction on Tuesday, March 19, 2019. - Picture By Silas Walker

...Article Contd...Who pays for airport remodels? - https://www.deseretnews.com/article/...york-city.html


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  #647  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2019, 11:32 AM
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Updates - June, 2019 - Salt Lake City International Airport



Quote:
Originally Posted by H4vok View Post

Newer pictures posted on the SLC airport website:














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  #648  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2019, 12:41 PM
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Southern Metro - Commuter Transit - Major Piece Of FrontRunner Puzzle Coming To Fruition



https://live.staticflickr.com/1733/4...47afe4c4_b.jpg


Vineyard receives federal grant to clear way for UTA FrontRunner location

Genelle Pugmire, for the Daily Herald - https://www.heraldextra.com/news/loc...982547b86.html

...The money for the Vineyard Rail Consolidation Project will help “relocate two miles of Union Pacific track that bisects Vineyard, thereby eliminating three public crossings, two private crossings and two inactive crossings to make room for residential and commercial growth, including an intermodal bus and rail stations,” according to the grant press release. The project will cost close to $18 million, Fullmer said. The money is coming as a combination of local, state and these federal funds...

..“It’s a very momentous thing for us, the state, other cities, the Utah Valley University (and) the people who first started the discussion,” Fullmer said. “There have been phone calls all day. I called our recent mayor to let him know it happened — we did it.”...

...“We’ve been working on this project for 12 years and we are all really excited about it,” said Jake McHargue, city manager. “This is the last piece to the puzzle and we feel excited to have this come in.”...

...“For over 13 years, those of us working on the Geneva project along with the city of Vineyard have worked tirelessly to find a way to remove the spur line from Geneva Road,” Park said. “Because of the multiple facets of the project affected by this deal, it is one of the most exciting developments that had happened to Geneva. The benefits to the project and the city will be significant.”

Val Peterson, vice president of finance and administration at Utah Valley University, said this gives the impetus the school needs to move forward with its expansion plans.

“It allows us to revitalize the Geneva site and Geneva Road from a hard industrial use and run down road to be used as a key component to the expansion and restoration of the Geneva corridor in UDOT’s plan, Orem’s Geneva renewal project and invites retail, businesses, and new possibilities and access for UVU’s master campus and sport campus,” Peterson said.

According to Peterson, “In addition to FrontRunner Commuter rail, it allows for light rail to come into the multimodal hub to move students through the Vineyard and Orem campuses, and onto the BRT system.”...



https://archive.sltrib.com/images/20...h_052517~9.jpg
Pictured, the dizzying pace of ongoing contruction at the city of Vineyard. Now America's fastest growing city with populations over one thousand.


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  #649  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2019, 2:05 PM
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Update - Downtown Adj. - Salt Lake City International Airport


By Steve Griffin, Deseret News


Public gets first glimpse into the future of Salt Lake airport

Grettel Kauffman - The Deseret News - https://www.deseretnews.com/article/...t-glimpse.html

SALT LAKE CITY — The first phase of the new Salt Lake City International Airport is just about a year away from completion, but the city is already looking ahead to the next two decades and beyond.

The Salt Lake City Department of Airports held its first in a series of public meetings on Wednesday night to update the public on the progress of the airport construction and the first findings of research into what the next 20 years might hold.

The first phase of the new airport, which will include a new gateway center, a 3,600-car parking garage, terminal, and north and south west concourses, is on track to open Sept. 15, 2020. The second phase, which will complete the rest of the concourses and demolish the existing buildings, will wrap up sometime in 2024 or 2025. "The question is, what happens after this new facility is built?" asked Steven Domino, senior northwest mountain region aviation planner with the airport consulting firm RS&H. "The community is going to continue to grow … and as the community grows, the airport needs to be able to respond to the demand that’s created within the community."

The airport currently serves about 26 million passengers each year, making it the 23rd busiest airport in North America — a ranking it's achieved largely because of its position as a hub for Delta Airlines. It was originally built to accommodate about 10 million annual passengers, according to city officials...


Construction continues on the new Salt Lake City International Airport on Friday, April 5, 2019. Steve Griffin, Deseret News

...The updated airport will include more restrooms, more concessions options — featuring local restaurants and vendors — and expanded, streamlined parking.

Between the local concessions options and art and paint color schemes intended to evoke Utah landscapes, "you’re going to have a sense of Utah in the new facility," Wyatt said...Now, with construction well underway, the city has begun to look ahead to what the next 20 years might bring.

Research for a new master plan currently in the works projects that the Salt Lake International Airport will see between 32.8 million and 43.6 million passengers per year by 2037. That's an estimate, Domino emphasized...
While the new master plan projects growth over the next 20 years, updates will be made according to the actual growth, not a strict year-based timeline, Domino said.

The new airport currently under construction will be designed in a way that will allow for future construction with minimal disruption to airport operations, Wyatt said.

"We want to be able to accommodate growth," Wyatt said, noting that it "can be expanded almost infinitely without significant passenger inconvenience."...



By Steve Griffin, Deseret News


By Steve Griffin, Deseret News


By Steve Griffin, Deseret News

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Last edited by delts145; Jul 19, 2019 at 4:08 PM.
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  #650  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2019, 4:29 PM
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Nonstop flights to Asia from Salt Lake City on Delta's 'drawing board' when new airport is finished

https://www.deseretnews.com/article/...w-airport.html

SALT LAKE CITY — Delta Air Lines sees its future hub in Salt Lake City International Airport's redesign as a key stepping stone in its mission to solidify its foothold in the international market.

And nonstop flights to Asia are likely part of that plan, according to an airline official.

Salt Lake City has been Delta's "fastest growing large hub" in recent years, and the city's airport rebuild is helping the airline set its sights on expanding global air connections, Joe Esposito, Delta's senior vice president of network planning, told the Salt Lake City Airport Advisory Board this week.

That could include nonstop flights to Asia when the city's massive, $4 billion redevelopment project is complete, he said. The first phase of the project is slated to open in 2020.

"We've been growing our U.S. position pretty rapidly for the past 10 years, and now we're starting to pivot more toward international service," Esposito said.

Salt Lake City's new airport will provide more gates for international flights, and Delta is eying nonstop flights from Salt Lake City to Seoul, South Korea, Esposito said.

"The Asian market here is actually fairly large," he said, adding that nonstop service to Seoul is "on our drawing board" and will likely be possible in "the next few years."

A nonstop flight to Seoul would join other nonstop flights Delta has begun to offer at Salt Lake City International, including flights to London, Amsterdam, Paris and Mexico City.

"We're really expanding the market position here in Salt Lake City on the international side," Esposito said.



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Last edited by delts145; Jul 19, 2019 at 4:48 PM.
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  #651  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2019, 8:13 AM
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Funny, SLC is also aggressively building new freeways and adding lanes to existing ones. Completely shows the induced demand fallacy is just that, a fallacy.
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  #652  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2019, 11:19 AM
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Downtown Adj. - New International Airport - Upcoming Additional Design and Artwork Treatment

Quote:
Originally Posted by jubguy3 View Post
This is exciting. Gordon Huether got commissioned to do more artwork for the airport, presumably because the art spending obligation has increased with expansion.

https://gordonhuether.com/news/addit...-intl-airport/

https://gordonhuether.com/news/salt-...irport-update/

Both of these are part of the north concourse east project so they will open in 2024. Nice to see the investment made but i will say its kind of unusual to blur the lines on what is art vs architectural for things that are mandated like this, it will be nice to have an art installation that is effectively a permanent part of the airport.
Construction for the now $4 billion Terminal Redevelopment Program at the Salt Lake City International Airport is about at its half-way point… and we are excited to share that Gordon Huether Studio has been engaged for additional scope and installations in the new North Concourse! The SLC team reached out and engaged Gordon to create significant installations for the new Concourse that would “tie into” the installations in the main terminal. As a result, Gordon and team are currently working on designs entitled Canyon 2.0 and Northern Light, which take inspiration and include design elements from The Canyon and The Falls, respectively.


https://gordonhuether.com/wp-content...HS_Airport.png


In addition to the several structurally-integrated art installations Gordon has created to date for the Salt Lake City Int’l Airport, a new installation designed by Gordon will adorn the Central Tunnel that connects travelers from the main terminal to the north concourse. The Central Tunnel, which spans over 1,000 feet, will feature Gordon’s “River Tunnel” installation and visually connect the art experiences from the main terminal to those in the north concourse.

After presenting several ideas to the SLCDA team, “River Tunnel” was decided upon and further refined. As in Gordon’s “Canyon” and “The Falls” installations, “River Tunnel” was inspired by the natural beauty of Utah and will be fabricated in the same fashion as “Canyon”: a membrane sculpture consisting of individual “fins” that have an aluminum frame, wrapped with Tweave Duratech® 570C fabric material and enclosed with a zipper along the back spine. LED lighting will be incorporated into the installation to further enhance the “river” effect within the tunnel.


Rendering of the tunnel without the additional artwork.

https://gordonhuether.com/wp-content...unnelImage.jpg


Renderings of the tunnel with the addition of artwork

https://gordonhuether.com/wp-content...52-768x576.jpg


https://gordonhuether.com/wp-content...-8-768x352.jpg


https://gordonhuether.com/wp-content...-1-768x432.jpg


https://gordonhuether.com/wp-content...-7-768x447.jpg

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Last edited by delts145; Aug 8, 2019 at 11:52 AM.
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  #653  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2019, 3:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hatman View Post
An overhead electric bus charger has been installed at Salt Lake Central Station. This device looks similar to the overhead chargers in Park City, but a much more compact design. I haven't heard if UTA is actually buying battery-electric buses or just testing them, but this infrastructure is permanent, which is a very good sign. .


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  #654  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2019, 3:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hatman View Post
Also this: The old Denver Rio Grande and Western Rail Road shop buildings are being slowly dismantled. The idea was originally to restore the buildings as a maintenance depot for UTA buses, but structural problems sent the costs too high. Instead UTA is salvaging the old bricks, which will be used on the exterior of the new structure that will be built on the same site.
It's always sad to lose historic buildings, but I'm not so torn up about this one. The buildings were utilitarian from the very beginning and were not designed to be long lasting. It is amazing they lasted this long.


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  #655  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2019, 11:40 PM
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Southern Metro Bus Rapid Transit A Big Success!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Makid View Post
New Provo-Orem rapid bus now rivals the ridership of TRAX Green Line

https://www.sltrib.com/news/politics...rem-bus-rapid/
QUOTE:
One Utah Transit Authority bus route now is carrying about as many people — or more on some days — as the Green Line TRAX trains.

The Utah Valley Express (UVX), a bus rapid transit line in Orem and Provo that serves both Utah Valley and Brigham Young universities, now averages about 14,600 boardings daily. On some days, like the football game between BYU and the University of Utah, it had more than 16,000.

In comparison, ridership on the Green Line TRAX averaged about 15,400 boardings a day in August. Its lowest monthly average so far this year was in May, with 13,284, according to UTA data.

Light-rail lines such as TRAX — which offer service every 15 minutes on trains with many long cars — usually carry far more passengers than bus routes. UTA funnels most of its bus lines to trains because of their capacity for more people and swifter travel.

But the UVX is not a typical bus line. Officials have called it a sort of TRAX on rubber wheels.

It offers service every six minutes at peak times, and every 10 minutes off-peak. About half its 10.5-mile route is in exclusive travel lanes for buses not shared with other vehicles. Buses have extra doors and limited stops. Buses are longer than normal — 60 feet instead of 40.

But Mary De La Mare-Schaefer, regional manager for UTA, sees an even bigger reason for high ridership on UVX.

“It’s the free fares,” she says.

UTA received a federal grant to allow free ridership on UVX for three years, and two years are left.

The agency also struck a deal with BYU and UVU to provide transit passes for unlimited transit on buses and trains to their students, faculty and staff — and, in some cases, their family members. The agreement costs each school $1 million a year for 10 years and is expected to provide up to 100,000 passes annually.

With all that, UTA bus ridership has increased nearly eightfold from the 1,863 boardings on average before UVX launched to its current daily average.

De La Mare-Schaefer said UTA also has seen an increase in FrontRunner train ridership as more students are deciding to commute via mass transit from as far away as Salt Lake County and even Davis and Weber counties, and transfer to UVX. She said the Orem station is the busiest on the FrontRunner line, and Provo is No. 2, because of UVX.

Utah Valley University is reporting that it sold 1,200-plus fewer parking passes to students this year than before UVX started operating, De La Mare-Schaefer said, reducing congestion and potentially giving the school more room for facilities besides parking.

“More students are not parking on campus,” she said. “They didn’t want to add another parking lot or parking structure, so that’s one of the indicators we like to look at.”

She noted that this is also the first year that BYU sent notices to its students and their parents that they need not bring a car because of service from UVX — which is also helping to drive up ridership. Such notice was not sent when the service first opened in August 2018 because it was still under partial construction, used some temporary stations and lacked some bus-only lanes.

UVX ridership does fall off dramatically during the summer, when fewer students are attending BYU and UVU. In August, before fall semesters at the universities began, ridership averaged only 5,866 daily, De La Mare-Schaefer said, before rising to about 14,600 when the schools were in full swing.

Still, she’s pleased that “about 40% of our ridership this summer was with community members. We believe the free fare encourages them to ride,” saying transit is new to many of them. Free fare helps them overcome “a fear barrier," and learn how to use mass transit, she said. And she hopes UVX can retain most of these riders when free fares eventually disappear.

UTA has more than 200 miles of additional bus-rapid transit lines in its future plans, including from downtown Ogden to Weber State University, from West Valley City through Taylorsville to Murray, and through Davis County to Salt Lake City.

While UTA has high hopes for similar success with them, De La Mare-Schaefer says that UVX may be “a little bit of a unicorn because we have these two large university populations, so our numbers are going to be high from those centers.”

Such success helped lead mayors in northern Utah County to kick off a study to look at whether a similar bus rapid transit system there may help solve some traffic problems and provide better access to the high-tech Silicon Slopes area.

Before its completion, UVX was controversial. Resident groups sued unsuccessfully to stop it, arguing, among other things, that it would have low ridership and would complicate traffic flow for other vehicles. It also had an $11 million cost overrun beyond its initial $190 million price tag because of higher-than-expected bids and land costs.

Still, the UVX was much cheaper than building a TRAX line. In 2011, the mid-Jordan TRAX extension covering an equal distance cost $535 million — 2.8 times the cost of UVX.

Stops on the UVX include the Orem FrontRunner Station, UVU, University Mall, BYU, the Latter-day Saint Missionary Training Center, downtown Provo, the Provo Town Centre Mall and the Provo FrontRunner station.

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  #656  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2019, 5:17 PM
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Salt Lake City has amazing infrastructure for a city/metro of its size.
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