HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > General Development

About The Ads  This week the ad company used in the forum will be monitoring activity and doing some tests to identify any problems which users may be experiencing. If at any time this week you get pop-ups, redirects, etc. as a result of ads please let us know by sending an email to forum@skyscraperpage.com or post in the ads complaint thread. Thank you for your participation.


    Sixty Hotel Montreal in the SkyscraperPage Database

Building Data Page   • Montreal Skyscraper Diagram

Map Location
Montreal Projects & Construction Forum

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #41  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2013, 1:44 AM
uqam+ uqam+ is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Montréal
Posts: 88
Très beau.

Un point m'étonne, par contre. L'article du message 23 nous dit que l'architecte sera Karl Fischer, de Montréal mais qui travaille surtout à New York. En cherchant le nom sur le net, on tombe sur pas mal d'articles négatifs dont un intitulé : Is Karl Fischer the worst architect in the city ?

http://therealdeal.com/blog/2011/11/...t-in-the-city/

Pas très encourageant ! On l'accuse de construire toujours les mêmes boîtes carrées pas chères... Pourtant, le projet ici a l'air plutôt soigné. Quelqu'un connaît ses réalisations à Montréal ?

Last edited by uqam+; Mar 3, 2013 at 12:20 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #42  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2013, 3:40 AM
MTLskyline's Avatar
MTLskyline MTLskyline is offline
The good old days are now
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Montreal
Posts: 4,193
Quote:
Originally Posted by uqam+ View Post
Très beau.

Un point m'étonne, par contre. L'article du message 23 nous dit que l'architecte sera Karl Fisher, de Montréal mais qui travaille surtout à New York. En cherchant le nom sur le net, on tombe sur pas mal d'articles négatifs dont un intitulé : Is Kark Fisher the worst architect in the city ?

http://therealdeal.com/blog/2011/11/...t-in-the-city/

Pas très encourageant ! On l'accuse de construire toujours les mêmes boîtes carrées pas chères... Pourtant, le projet ici a l'air plutôt soigné. Quelqu'un connaît ses réalisations à Montréal ?
Voici quelques-uns de ces réalisations à Montréal:

Il y a aussi plusieurs maisons et des bâtiments commerciaux.

http://www.kfarchitect.com/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #43  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2013, 10:39 AM
mousquet's Avatar
mousquet mousquet is offline
that prick
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Nimbyland Paris, Museum France
Posts: 3,423
Yet another nice mixed-use design for Montreal, I see...
__________________
psst... A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. (John 13:34)
Notre maison brûle... Et nous regardons ailleurs ! - Jacques Chirac on environmental issues in 2002.
I like bass. Give me some.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #44  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2013, 11:39 AM
uqam+ uqam+ is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Montréal
Posts: 88
Merci Mtlskyline !

J'avais oublié l'existence du site images Montréal, qui est pourtant une mine d'or inépuisable.

Certaines des transformations de vieux immeubles faites par Fischer ne sont pas si mal.

Dans les articles sur lui, on dit que son lien à New York est d'abord passé par la communauté hassidique, pour laquelle il a fait plusieurs projets. Indépendamment de Fischer, j'ai toujours aimé le fait que grâce à la communauté juive nous étions une sorte de petite soeur du nord pour bien des New Yorkais. Petite soeur où les bagels sont meilleurs ! (Mais qui peut aussi exporter de la mauvaise architecture...)

Last edited by uqam+; Mar 3, 2013 at 12:22 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #45  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2013, 12:04 PM
Rico Rommheim's Avatar
Rico Rommheim Rico Rommheim is offline
Look at me!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: City of Bagels
Posts: 12,241
Karl Fischer seems to take the criticism in a quite humble way. Here's the link to that article that was mentioned.

Quote:

NY’s most loathed architect
It’s Karl Fischer, designer of glass boxes

Every time one of his buildings goes up, it seems another New Yorker’s heart sinks.



Since 2003, Montreal-based architect Karl Fischer has designed more than 200 residential structures in Manhattan and Brooklyn, each one looking very much like the last: glass-curtained boxes flecked with grim brick or concrete, characterless high-rises in bohemian areas that, like uninvited party guests, seem to neither know nor care that they are profoundly out of place.

“Like doctors, there is a certain ethic of the architect: You’re not supposed to make anything worse,” says Aleksandr Mergold, architect and professor at Cornell University. “I’m not saying Karl Fischer is making things worse. But he’s not making things any better. That Cold War look seems to come from a lack of imagination. Great business model, though.”

Angel Chevrestt
Schaefer Landing in Williamsburg, one of nearly 200 residential buildings architect Karl Fischer has designed in New York City.
Indeed. Among the projects on Fischer’s desk are the conversion of two 100-year-old townhouses on East Third Street, the conversion of St. Vincent’s on 52nd Street, and a new hotel on 34th Street. This summer, when Fischer released a rendering of his six-story apartment building (glass, concrete, shoved between low-lying brick tenements) set to go up at 427 E. 12th St., preservationists reeled.

“The contempt for the historical and architectural character and context of the neighborhood is appalling,” Bowery Alliance of Neighbors member David Mulkins told the Local East Village at the time.

Still, Fischer’s designs -- lacking as they may be -- are constrained by a host of other factors, from zoning laws to the developers’ budgets to marketing directives. “I’m proud of almost all the buildings I do,” Fischer says.

At real-estate blog Curbed.com, Fischer, who works mainly in Williamsburg, Greenpoint and lower Manhattan, has become something of a bête noire. “We average eight posts a month on him,” says editor Sara Polsky. “With our readers, he’s among the worst offenders.”

Fischer maintains a low profile, but he tells The Post he’s aware of the anger he elicits; he reads those comments. “It’s hard to tell whether that’s people speaking from their heart or getting something off their chests,” he says. “You always start out with the best intentions.”

It wasn’t until his first year at Canada’s McGill University that Fischer discovered architecture: He enrolled as an engineering major but found it all too “cut-and-dried, not creative enough.” He never really felt a calling for architecture before, but says that, in high school, “I enjoyed geometric shapes.” He loves Paris for “the ornate and the modern architecture,” says his favorite New York building is the Flatiron and his least the buildings at the Cooperative Village near Grand Street. “There’s no design to them at all,” he says.

Aesthetically, Fischer fills the regrettable gap left by Robert Scarano, the New York City architect who specialized in outsized buildings done on the cheap, with facades that looked defiantly, lazily modern among more time-worn, pre-existing structures. (Scarano voluntarily surrendered his certification privileges in 2006, after the city charged him with violating building codes.)

“Since Scarano went out of business, Fischer is probably the most prolific architect in New York,” says one real-estate broker.

Fischer, 62, credits his long-standing relationship with the Hasidic communities in Brooklyn and Montreal, where they do the bulk of mid-priced residential development, with his success. “I started off working with the Hasidic community on Kent Avenue, doing their housing,” Fischer says.

His ability to work cheap and fast led to Fischer’s first big project in New York, the 2003 conversion of Williamsburg’s famed Gretsch Factory. It was fairly un-controversial: The interior was gutted, the exterior -- except for a dubious paint job -- left alone. His cornerstone project was 2005’s Schaefer Landing, a high-rise glass residential building on the Williamsburg waterfront, upsetting as much for its aesthetic mediocrity as for all it represented: rapid, irreversible gentrification, the death of romantic living in illegally converted lofts.

“Schaefer Landing just looks like everything else along that north Brooklyn waterfront,” says Julie Golia, public historian at the Brooklyn Historical Society. The response to Fischer reminds Golia of the war between Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs, the modern vs. the historical, practical economics vs. the human cost. “It speaks to the tension between architecture and the world around it,” she says. “It’s is connected to the mall-i-fication of certain areas. His work lacks a point of view.”

As for Fischer, he’s just surprised that anyone can recognize one of his buildings on sight. “Even though many people say they recognize my style of architecture,” he says, “personally, I don’t feel like I have one.”
http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion...6ldDVqmnO64DMN

Last edited by Rico Rommheim; Mar 3, 2013 at 12:25 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #46  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2013, 7:45 PM
shakman's Avatar
shakman shakman is offline
Chairman
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: PRMD - People's Republic of Maryland
Posts: 2,562
Much better design. Hopefully the actual product will look just as great.
__________________
"I measure the value of life not by how much I have, instead by what I have done and will do.

-sb
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #47  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2013, 3:12 AM
SkyMatt SkyMatt is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 13
Figured I'd take some pictures of the existing building before work begins.


View from the front


View from the back
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #48  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2013, 12:00 AM
Rumors's Avatar
Rumors Rumors is offline
Ciao tutti
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: French Canada.
Posts: 1,125
The building looks like its vacant. My photos: ,
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #49  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2013, 12:04 AM
Rico Rommheim's Avatar
Rico Rommheim Rico Rommheim is offline
Look at me!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: City of Bagels
Posts: 12,241
It has been vacant for months now. Still waiting for signs of demolition crews!

This project is gonna take a while, first the demolition of the building (1 year?), the excavation (a few months) and then finally the tower. So maybe 3 years before opening, I'd say.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #50  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2013, 1:27 AM
Robertpuant Robertpuant is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Montréal
Posts: 765
Let's hope it starts sooner rather than later. Le V is nice and all, but it can't handle all the brown and beige in the eastern part of downtown all by itself.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2013, 11:09 AM
uqam+ uqam+ is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Montréal
Posts: 88
Un détail me frappe en voyant les photos qui montrent le V et l'édifice qui sera remplacé par le point zéro.

On dirait que l'architecte du "V" a conçu la base de l'immeuble pour faire la transition et peut-être même s'harmoniser, jusqu'à un certain point, avec le béton d'à côté. La façade ouest (de la base) reste ainsi très "beige".

Mais avec le point zéro qui sera tout à fait différent, cette harmonie beige va devenir inutile. Dans trois ans, on se demandera sans doute pourquoi le "V" a cette façade beige qui ne rappellera plus rien dans son environnement.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #52  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2013, 1:32 PM
franktko's Avatar
franktko franktko is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Montréal
Posts: 1,164
Peut-être que les gens du V pensaient que cet édifice allait survivre beaucoup plus longtemps - dans les rendus originaux du Point Zéro (comme on le voit sur l'affiche sur l'hôtel présentement), l'édifice actuel n'était pas détruit. Il y a-t-il encore une chance que cet édifice soit récupéré? Les derniers plans du PZ qui incluent la démolition de l'édifice, c'est proposés ou approuvés?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #53  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2013, 2:00 PM
Rico Rommheim's Avatar
Rico Rommheim Rico Rommheim is offline
Look at me!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: City of Bagels
Posts: 12,241
I must say that I am quite disappointed with the lack of progress here. By now, I thought the old Hotel would have been knocked down. But nothing has changed since last summer.

It's too bad because with half a dozen downtown hotel closures in the past 2 years you'd think Pullman would hurry up to capitalize on it. Hopefully the closure of the Delta will re-invigortae this one?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #54  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2013, 4:35 AM
SkahHigh's Avatar
SkahHigh SkahHigh is offline
More transit please
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 3,337
Anyone know what's up with this one, or at least the demolition of the vacant building? There is a sign on the door about a public hearing concerning the demolition, but it dates back to May 2013...

Last edited by SkahHigh; Jan 13, 2014 at 9:23 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #55  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2013, 3:26 PM
Rico Rommheim's Avatar
Rico Rommheim Rico Rommheim is offline
Look at me!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: City of Bagels
Posts: 12,241
No change with this one as of last night when I passed by it.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #56  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2014, 9:26 PM
SkahHigh's Avatar
SkahHigh SkahHigh is offline
More transit please
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 3,337
With no website, I think this project is pretty much dead. Demolition work never started at first.

What bothers me the most about this is these two ugly concrete buildings on René-Lévesque... What an eyesore. At least Point Zero would bring down the current 440 René-Lévesque.

Selon Maledizione sur mtlurb:
Le contrat avec Accor a été annulé. Donc, la démolition de l’édifice actuel ne se déroulera pas cette année.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #57  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2014, 9:45 PM
Rico Rommheim's Avatar
Rico Rommheim Rico Rommheim is offline
Look at me!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: City of Bagels
Posts: 12,241
Goddamn it I was really hoping that eyesore go down and a sleek tower rise in its place. Now, dozens of people who worked at the hotel are out of work so we could get an abandoned skyscraper downtown.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #58  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2014, 10:05 PM
SkahHigh's Avatar
SkahHigh SkahHigh is offline
More transit please
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 3,337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico Rommheim View Post
Goddamn it I was really hoping that eyesore go down and a sleek tower rise in its place. Now, dozens of people who worked at the hotel are out of work so we could get an abandoned skyscraper downtown.
It's already abandoned, the demolition permit is still visible at the entrance...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #59  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2014, 11:35 PM
Rico Rommheim's Avatar
Rico Rommheim Rico Rommheim is offline
Look at me!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: City of Bagels
Posts: 12,241
Yeah I know I pass by it on my way to work every night. It was an eyesore before but it was useful. Now it's both useless and eyesore.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #60  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2014, 4:19 AM
MTLskyline's Avatar
MTLskyline MTLskyline is offline
The good old days are now
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Montreal
Posts: 4,193
Looks like they hired a lobbyist. Perhaps they had trouble getting the proper authorizations. The lobbyist's mandate began at the beginning of 2013, but strangely, was only registered recently.

Info courtesy of martin001

Quote:
Originally Posted by Registre des lobbyistes

Libman, Robert (registered 2014-01-29)

Manioli Investments Inc. (Point-Zero)

Mandat :

Période couverte par le mandat : du 2013-01-02 au 2014-12-31

Contrepartie reçue ou à recevoir : de 10 000 $ à 50 000 $

Objet des activités :
  • Proposition législative ou réglementaire, résolution, orientation, programme ou plan d'action
  • Permis, licence, certificat ou autre autorisation
Renseignements utiles :
This mandate is to work with the City of Montreal (Ville-Marie Borough) towards obtaining all municipal approvals necessary for the demolition of the client's existing building at 400 René Levesque West and construction on the site of a new mixed use project of 28 floors that will include hotel, condominium and commercial components. The existing building is a former hotel and restaurant that is vacant. In order to demolish, it requires approval by resolution by the demolition committee of the borough and the granting of a demolition permit. During this process, the borough's urban planning committee and council must approve the architecture of the new project, which includes the surhauteur elevations and a minor derogations to the zoning bylaw regarding a slightly smaller setback along de Bleury street.
https://www.lobby.gouv.qc.ca/service...sRecentes.aspx
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > General Development
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:07 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.