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  #81  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2013, 5:18 PM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
Point Pelee sure looks... pointy...

I'll show myself out, but, seriously, that's impressive. Looks very unusual.
It's really neat when you walk down to the end, waves coming in from both sides crash into each other at the tip, it's quite sight to see, especially when it's really windy. Pelee Island has its own tip as well, but you have to be very careful as there are very strong rip tides that have caused many people to drown unfortunately. Swimming elsewhere on the island is amazing though, with water temps getting well past 25c in the summer.
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  #82  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2013, 8:22 PM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
Point Pelee sure looks... pointy...

I'll show myself out, but, seriously, that's impressive. Looks very unusual.
The tip of the point often changes in length and can vary from being rather short to quite long. Not only that but the tip of the point will also change direction sometimes from year to year depending on the prevailing currents and how sediment is deposited.

It's a wonderful park but it is very small. There has been a movement for a number of years to either expand the park or to connect it via natural corridors to other nearby conservation areas or swamps. The fear is the ecosystem in the park will become genetically isolated and be detrimental in the long term. The biggest problem standing in the way of this is the soil in that part of the country is very, very rich soil extremely good for certain crops.

Peak times are in the spring with the influx of migrating birds and the monarch migration in the fall.
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  #83  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2013, 4:54 AM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Land scarce Vancouver could do with that flat portion on the US side. Too bad they didn't settle on the 48th parallel instead of the 49th. You can see where the border is.
If the border were farther south Vancouver would no doubt be sprawling for miles to the south. Even Seattle has some restrictions because of the ocean and the lakes, so it sprawls north-south.
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  #84  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2013, 8:27 PM
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If the border were farther south Vancouver would no doubt be sprawling for miles to the south. Even Seattle has some restrictions because of the ocean and the lakes, so it sprawls north-south.
But that assumes that Vancouver would still exist as Canada's major Pacific metropolis were the border further south.

You have to look back at why Vancouver came into being and then consider what would have happened with a more southerly border: would Vancouver have even come into existence or would the forces that made Vancouver fix on some other location instead?

Just consider the effect of a border along the 48th at the other end: it would have made establishing a railway west of Thunder Bay a good deal easier since Lake of the Woods and its south shore would be entirely in Canada so the route that was later used by the Canadian Northern following what is now Hwy 11 would have been available. We probably would have had a functioning Thunder Bay to Winnipeg railway in existence several years earlier, meaning settlement on the Prairies could have started in earnest about a decade earlier than it did.
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  #85  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 12:30 AM
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The Commander must love us. Is he from Newfoundland? I've no idea...

Anyhow, yet again, we were his nightly finale:


https://twitter.com/Cmdr_Hadfield/st...934784/photo/1

Beautiful! You can see everything, from Channel-Port-aux-Basques (where the main ferry linking Newfoundland to Canada docks) in the southwest to St. John's in the east.

And even the French islands, St-Pierre-et-Miquelon, just off the boot of the Burin Peninsula. The three islands are Miquelon and Langlade (the ones linked by a sandbar). Not many people live on these two. The little one further southeast is St-Pierre. It's where the capital is. I can't say enough good about it, you should go:

Video Link


I can't wait to go back this summer. The "only" stamp on my new passport is Bermuda!
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  #86  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 1:04 AM
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Wow St-Pierre et Miquelon looks awesome!

How do you felt going there?

I mean it's North-America, but it is not ... I'm confused about that place...
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  #87  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 1:18 AM
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It's the most fascinating experience in the world, Franks, to see what another people, another culture, did with EXACTLY the same building blocks/ingredients as your own ancestors.

We share a great deal in common, most of which is obvious - but there are deeper, cultural traits as well. A very strong sense of identity, a deep love and affection for home, and a feeling of belonging more to the old world than the new.

The people there are amazing. They always look at least a decade younger than people of the same age in Newfoundland. They have above-ground tombs in their cemeteries, etc. They consider Quebecois to be hicks, and not the other way around.

Their culture has almost NO North American traits. They still have three-hour lunch breaks. Booze and cigarettes are still cheaper than a pack of gum.

And they're also very welcoming, which is to be commended. In that video, she briefly mentions the Exodus. Many were killed, and many hundreds died, in their forced expulsion to St-Pierre from colonial Newfoundland (The Exodus is also the source of many of Newfoundland's French place names, such as Isle-aux-Morts, Baie-de-Mortier, Baie D'Espoir etc.).

It's just the coolest place. And the bakeries... OMG, delicious... and the drinking age is, I believe, 14.

You just have to go. It's another world. It's like a time capsule of 19th Century France (St-Pierre) and Acadia (Miquelon).
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  #88  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 2:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
It's the most fascinating experience in the world, Franks, to see what another people, another culture, did with EXACTLY the same building blocks/ingredients as your own ancestors.

We share a great deal in common, most of which is obvious - but there are deeper, cultural traits as well. A very strong sense of identity, a deep love and affection for home, and a feeling of belonging more to the old world than the new.

The people there are amazing. They always look at least a decade younger than people of the same age in Newfoundland. They have above-ground tombs in their cemeteries, etc. They consider Quebecois to be hicks, and not the other way around.

Their culture has almost NO North American traits. They still have three-hour lunch breaks. Booze and cigarettes are still cheaper than a pack of gum.

And they're also very welcoming, which is to be commended. In that video, she briefly mentions the Exodus. Many were killed, and many hundreds died, in their forced expulsion to St-Pierre from colonial Newfoundland (The Exodus is also the source of many of Newfoundland's French place names, such as Isle-aux-Morts, Baie-de-Mortier, Baie D'Espoir etc.).

It's just the coolest place. And the bakeries... OMG, delicious... and the drinking age is, I believe, 14.

You just have to go. It's another world. It's like a time capsule of 19th Century France (St-Pierre) and Acadia (Miquelon).
The most fascinating ? ...Oh darn, and I tought it was Bora-Bora !

It looks affordable for you to get there, but I can't imagine how long it would be to me! ... I checked for a flight and it's pretty expensive unfortunately.

...Aswell, I tought it might have the pleasure to drive there with my own car, and apparently the ferry isnt even allowing vehicules..

Btw, not sure what is a Hick, hence I tried to translate and I got something like ''farmer''... then I don't know if it's fine or not !

I watched alot of pictures from there recently with google maps, and something I noticed is how good are the roads there, when at the same time, with same climate & weather, our roads are fucked up and cracked. Does European way to built roads makes a difference!? ... I tend to say, yes !

If you got any personal pictures from there, I'd like to see it !

Cheers.
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  #89  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 2:22 AM
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Le Cabestan (the main ferry) is in St. John's for repairs so, if vehicles aren't permitted, it's surely temporary. You see SPM license plates in southern Newfoundland all the time. But you don't need a car there. It's very dense for a small town.
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  #90  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 2:33 AM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
Le Cabestan (the main ferry) is in St. John's for repairs so, if vehicles aren't permitted, it's surely temporary. You see SPM license plates in southern Newfoundland all the time. But you don't need a car there. It's very dense for a small town.
By vehicule I meant ''car'', or there is something I don't understand when I read :

Q: Can I take my vehicle on board le Cabestan?

A: No, le Cabestan is a passenger ferry only. No passenger ferries between Fortune and St. Pierre take vehicles on board.

http://www.saintpierreferry.ca/St._P...ffice/FAQ.html
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  #91  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 2:37 AM
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No, you've understood the English perfectly. I wonder how they get their cars over...
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  #92  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 3:00 AM
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No, you've understood the English perfectly. I wonder how they get their cars over...
How did you get there? You drived to fortune and parked your car there?
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  #93  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 3:20 AM
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We had a summer cottage in Grand Beach, which is north of Fortune (Between Grand Bank and Marystown). Most of the time my parents would drive us - don't laugh. And we went there on class trips once or twice as well.

But I remember driving (as a passenger) uphill out of St-Pierre and seeing all of the massive cottages owned by continental French...? I can't remember who I was with, but I remember that excursion...
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  #94  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 6:15 AM
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Pelee Island is awesome, we go at least twice a year, rent bikes and hit the winery pavilion. It's a very laid back and friendly place, with total strangers waving as you pass by, it's known as the Pelee wave, and it happens often. Lots of nature and gorgeous beaches to explore. We always take the last ferry home, as we can drive back home in half an hour, but there are lots of cottages to rent if you prefer to stay longer. You should also hit all the wineries around Amherstburg, Harrow and Colchester on the mainland, when you are visiting the island, lots to see and great wine and eats.
Interesting. My uncle owns many cottages on the island. And my grandparents own one as well. Mainly the Cottages along the shore facing Point Pelee, where the old docks are.

Interesting history, my grandma's family used to be a part of the servanthood that served the family that lived in the old mansion.

Love the ice cream there.
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  #95  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2013, 3:03 PM
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Originally Posted by FrAnKs View Post
Btw, not sure what is a Hick, hence I tried to translate and I got something like ''farmer''... then I don't know if it's fine or not !

.
It's not a compliment.

Hick = rustre or "colon".
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  #96  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2013, 7:22 PM
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Commander Hadfield recently had a chat with some Martensville, Saskatchewan students (Martensville is a bedroom community that can be seen just above Saskatoon)
*props for Chris mentioning that Saskatoon is on the South Saskatchewan River (I've heard it broadcast on national television as being on North Saskatchewan River before) guess its easier to tell when you are in space
https://twitter.com/Cmdr_Hadfield/st...772417/photo/1
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  #97  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2013, 7:27 PM
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Yesterday he was streaming with some students in an Airdrie elementary school too! Airidrie is Calgary's primary and most populated suburban city, about 50 000 people, just to the north of Calgary.
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  #98  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2013, 11:10 PM
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Victoria BC, courtesy of Colonel Hadfield.

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  #99  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2013, 10:29 PM
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Here is an aerial view of Montréal... in 1947!

http://www.app.catbus.ca/1947satelliteview/app.html
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  #100  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2013, 3:52 AM
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Here is an aerial view of Montréal... in 1947!

http://www.app.catbus.ca/1947satelliteview/app.html
It's cute that the map URL claims it's satellite view.
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