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  #541  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2019, 3:54 PM
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Haven't received an email thus far.

But yeah, it wouldn't suprise me if its legal in nature, that they are being tight lipped on.
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  #542  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 6:01 AM
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https://www.updateson45broad.com/

Quote:
Construction Update #22

Summary
Over the past three weeks, we’ve been surveying and reviewing the site.

Weeks of 9/23 + 9/30 + 10/7
We will be coordinating foundation work with contractor, subcontractor and design professionals. There will be no active construction work during this period.
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  #543  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 9:35 AM
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It might be better to hold off at this point. The last thing they need is to start construction just in time for the rumoured recession next year.
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  #544  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2019, 1:21 PM
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Everyone just needs to relax. Here's that piece from a couple of months ago...



https://webcache.googleusercontent.c...&ct=clnk&gl=us

Robert Gladstone on Selling Out 212 Fifth Avenue and the 45 Broad Street Development
The head of Madison Equities (who sold an $80M apartment to Jeff Bezos) has conquered NoMad and is ready for FiDi


BY NICHOLAS RIZZI
JULY 16, 2019


Quote:
The head of Madison Equities was able to completely sell out the 48 units in the company’s condo conversion project at 212 Fifth Avenue last month, after nearly four years of development and some turbulence—including a lawsuit against its original brokers, delays to construction, a fluctuating price to its penthouse and a struggling luxury market.

The average apartment in the building, which Madison developed with Building and Land Technology and Thor Equities, sold for about $10 million, and the building reportedly attracted some big-name buyers.

But perhaps the one to get the most ink was Jeff Bezos’ nearly $80 million purchase of the penthouse—which had its listing price bounce around from $73.8 million to $58 million—along with the two units below it last month, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Aside from selling out 212 Fifth Avenue, Madison is also near the finish line on the foundation for its ambitious—and risky—building at 45 Broad Street in the Financial District. The project will be the first residential in the neighborhood, planned to rise 1,100 feet, and Gladstone has spent the past few years installing 470 steel piles into the ground for the building.

Commercial Observer sat down with Gladstone in his Madison Avenue office to talk about the development of both buildings and his recent crusade to try to help make the subway system more accessible.
Quote:
What’s the status of the 45 Broad Street project?

[It’s] still in the foundation stage. We had several methods presented to us to do the foundation. The building sits on rock, but the rock is 45 feet down. We had ways that would have shaved six to nine months off the foundation process and $5, $6, $7 or $8 million off of it.

We chose two years ago to go in the direction of this substantial foundation. We have 470 vertical elements [concrete rods drilled into the ground that create a wall] on the bottom floor—which is 9,000 square feet. It’s something called secant piles. We’re grabbing rock at all these locations.

All the drilling and piling is now completed and now we’re starting on the actual pouring of the foundation. That will go on for four months and it will have taken us two years to do this and a lot more money then we wanted to spend.
But the elevators will work perfectly because they will be sitting on solid ground.
Quote:
What was the concept you had when you started this project?

The views [start in the Financial District] at 240 feet. So I said, “That’s exactly where I want to start the apartments.” Below that, we have amenity space and eight floors of office space, mechanical and so forth. Almost every apartment has a view of water, which is really very important.

We also sized the units so that the average sale would be in the mid-$2 millions and that this could be an alternative place for people to live. Mostly two bedrooms so it would satisfy couples, “baby maybes.” A “baby maybe” says, right now we need a large one [bedroom] but we maybe might need two. There are a number of threes for families. Schools down in this area are sensational, some of New York’s best schools, so we knew that we would be attracting families and yet we wanted to keep the prices as low as possible.
Quote:
Can you talk a little bit about the subway elevators being built with this project?

When this began, I learned there was something called the subway improvement bonus [where a developer pays for an improvement to a subway station in exchange for a zoning benefit] which is a very enlightened idea the city uses.

New York City has 24 percent of its [subway] stations that are accessible for people with disabilities. The next worse city is 60 percent and there are cities in this country that have 100 percent. At first, I thought, “This is an interesting thing. I’m doing social good and I didn’t think it would cost too much.” I understood that this is the J/Z line, so it’s the terminus of one and the beginning of the other. [It has] split platforms and, especially after 9/11, we needed two elevators. I figured the cost would be between $8 and $11 million and it’s costing $22 million, which is ridiculous.

When I met with the individuals with disabilities, who came to each one of our approval programs, it was very moving. These people were extraordinarily articulate and happily came, spent their own money, asked for nothing and spoke upon the building’s behalf. Needless to say, we’re very proud and happy to do that and the two elevators will be built. We’ve spoken to the borough president’s office about expanding this program so that it can be done by other developers in other locations. Let private enterprise do what city can no longer afford. And I think that is the catch-all for what business citizens are supposed to do.
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  #545  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2019, 9:46 PM
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One has to wonder if the whole Pizzarotti debacle at 1 Seaport has anything or nothing to do with the delays here. Meaning, has it inspired them to spend more money and take more time on the more expensive, and more stable foundation than they otherwise would have planned? Interesting...
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  #546  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2019, 12:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadHaj View Post
One has to wonder if the whole Pizzarotti debacle at 1 Seaport has anything or nothing to do with the delays here. Meaning, has it inspired them to spend more money and take more time on the more expensive, and more stable foundation than they otherwise would have planned? Interesting...
Doubt it.


Quote:
We chose two years ago to go in the direction of this substantial foundation. We have 470 vertical elements [concrete rods drilled into the ground that create a wall] on the bottom floor—which is 9,000 square feet. It’s something called secant piles. We’re grabbing rock at all these locations.

All the drilling and piling is now completed and now we’re starting on the actual pouring of the foundation. That will go on for four months and it will have taken us two years to do this and a lot more money then we wanted to spend. But the elevators will work perfectly because they will be sitting on solid ground.
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  #547  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2019, 5:22 AM
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I'm really anticipating this one! It's interesting to see Lower Manhattan developing in all aspects. The WTC before and now has always dominated the area during it's existence. However; projects like this and others to come will make it 'part of the skyline' but not 'thee skyline' like we were used to. Especially when looking over from the Brooklyn Bridge. So many new buildings including Beekman Place have gone up in the last ten years that almost totally block certain views of the WTC and especially the Woolworth Building. One day it may require a 2,000 foot building to stake any kind of dominance in Lower Manhattan, at least that prospect becomes more and more realistic with each project like this.
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  #548  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2019, 11:09 PM
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from today. This is about as under construction as 2 WTC is.

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click here too see hunser's list of the many supertall skyscrapers of New York City!
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  #549  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2019, 11:28 PM
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Erosion is a slow process. This projects progress occurs in geologic time.
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  #550  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 2:47 AM
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Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
Erosion is a slow process. This projects progress occurs in geologic time.
Ohh so that's what they're waiting on
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  #551  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 4:42 AM
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At least they have a port o potty on site. It's what, about 12 feet tall?
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  #552  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHAPINM1 View Post
I'm really anticipating this one! It's interesting to see Lower Manhattan developing in all aspects. The WTC before and now has always dominated the area during it's existence. However; projects like this and others to come will make it 'part of the skyline' but not 'thee skyline' like we were used to. Especially when looking over from the Brooklyn Bridge. So many new buildings including Beekman Place have gone up in the last ten years that almost totally block certain views of the WTC and especially the Woolworth Building. One day it may require a 2,000 foot building to stake any kind of dominance in Lower Manhattan, at least that prospect becomes more and more realistic with each project like this.

I expect that 80 South would challange the WTC more than this one, but yeah, 45 Broad will definitely be noticeable, bringing more of a focal point back towards the financial district classics.
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  #553  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 1:25 PM
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Often I wonder how the twins would have looked on today's skyline (any artists out there feel free to give us all a look!), with Goldman Sachs' building and the several residential near supertalls, especially the Gehry.

Then I look at 90's images and the twins are All Dominating. In a way, it would have been a shame for them to lose that today what with all the taller buildings that have gone up.

Food for thought.
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  #554  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 5:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Visionist View Post
Often I wonder how the twins would have looked on today's skyline (any artists out there feel free to give us all a look!), with Goldman Sachs' building and the several residential near supertalls, especially the Gehry.

Then I look at 90's images and the twins are All Dominating. In a way, it would have been a shame for them to lose that today what with all the taller buildings that have gone up.

Food for thought.
I was wondering that very exact same thing! To take it a step further, I really wonder if all the new taller buildings would have ever gone up in an alternate timeline. It 'seems' at least from the perspective here that the construction wave really started in Lower Manhattan as an indirect result of 9/11 due to tax breaks, government incentives, ect... all to get businesses to return to the area, initially anyways, in the early years following. One direct example being the Goldman Sachs headquarters. That's really been floating in my mind as well, because it really seems the construction boom really began starting in 2002 with then Mayor Bloomberg wish a push to keep the NYC skyline moving forward in part as a potential response as well. There are other factors at play as well, including economic; however, this 'seems' to be at least in part one of them.
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Last edited by CHAPINM1; Sep 27, 2019 at 5:22 PM.
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  #555  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 8:44 PM
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I have a feeling the Goldman Sachs site was initially earmarked for the World Product Center before 9/11 pushed that project back, to the Yards whereupon it was ultimately cancelled.

Would have made sense to have the WTC, WFC and WPC close together.
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  #556  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2019, 1:17 AM
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If I was going to build in Manhattan, it would be the at the highest point, the least likely spot to be affected by rising seas. Downtown Manhattan is not that place.
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  #557  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2019, 6:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Visionist View Post
I have a feeling the Goldman Sachs site was initially earmarked for the World Product Center before 9/11 pushed that project back, to the Yards whereupon it was ultimately cancelled.

Would have made sense to have the WTC, WFC and WPC close together.
Interesting points, it sure seemed though there were a few skyline redefining project proposals throughout the 1990's (New York Stock Exchange Tower); however, none of them came into fruition. Also, during the 1980's and 1990's construction was rather stagnant. The WFC and CitySpire were to only major projects that went up during that time that were skyline changers. In the 1990's I guess one could also include the then Conde Nast Tower (4 Times Square) or even the Trump Tower in the very early 2000's. Overall though it did seem there was little activity from the 1970's (Citygroup Center, WTC, ect) up until the 2000's when the boom was really set in motion.

I wonder though if Bank of America would have built there own tower had they never lost their space at the WTC. An interesting coincidence, Conde Nast moved from Midtown out of their original to the WTC and Bank of America was once at the WTC and moved to Midtown then building their own tower (One Bryant Park). Also interesting that with all that said how both 4 Times Square and One Bryant Park sit right next to each other. Seems like an ongoing game of tug of war between Midtown and Downtown regard to all the different tenants.
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  #558  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2019, 5:19 PM
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If 9/11 hadn't happened I would imagine that NYC would have something around 2000 ft tall by now. I would also imagine that 9/11 stunted skyscraper development in Manhattan for many years. The economy may have been much stronger also up til the current day as the government wouldn't be wasting trillions on pointless never ending wars.
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  #559  
Old Posted Sep 29, 2019, 5:58 AM
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Originally Posted by photoLith View Post
If 9/11 hadn't happened I would imagine that NYC would have something around 2000 ft tall by now. I would also imagine that 9/11 stunted skyscraper development in Manhattan for many years. The economy may have been much stronger also up til the current day as the government wouldn't be wasting trillions on pointless never ending wars.
Yeah, could be. Just know that the outcome today seems very different than one could have imagined otherwise after shaking off those very early turbulent years. Just something that goes though my mind often, comparing the alternate skyline timelines and comparing them. ><
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