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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 1:48 PM
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The Canadian TV Thread



A little off topic, but does anyone watch the SJW News (i mean CBC National News) anymore????

Not one single CBC show on that list.

I do watch the CBC regional news at 11 PM, but if I ever watch the national news at 10 PM, it's usually only accidentally (I'm surfing and there happens to be something interesting on as I'm flicking through).

It would appear that The Beaverton is now a more influential news source than the CBC is............
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 2:11 PM
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A little off topic, but does anyone watch the SJW News (i mean CBC National News) anymore????

Not one single CBC show on that list.

I do watch the CBC regional news at 11 PM, but if I ever watch the national news at 10 PM, it's usually only accidentally (I'm surfing and there happens to be something interesting on as I'm flicking through).

It would appear that The Beaverton is now a more influential news source than the CBC is............
I think it's safe to say that CBC's plan to have 6 different anchors instead of just replacing Peter Mansbridge has fallen flat.

We don't get any real CTV news coverage in Newfoundland unless you stay up until 11:30, so it's a non factor that I never see. Personally, I stick with CBC NL news at 6:00 but never watch the National at 10:30 anymore. I read CBC NL online and occasionally the CBC national website will get a click when I'm at work on a slow day.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 2:24 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post


A little off topic, but does anyone watch the SJW News (i mean CBC National News) anymore????

Not one single CBC show on that list.

I do watch the CBC regional news at 11 PM, but if I ever watch the national news at 10 PM, it's usually only accidentally (I'm surfing and there happens to be something interesting on as I'm flicking through).

It would appear that The Beaverton is now a more influential news source than the CBC is............
Well, looking at that list, for Canadian content you have:

The Amazing Race Canada (derivative of US show)
CTV News
CFL football
Global News
Blue Jays baseball (effectively the Canadian outpost in a US-based league)
The Beaverton

We're not exactly setting it on fire for domestic content.

That being said, the loss of Peter Mansbridge on the National is kind of the ending of an era for the CBC. Indeed, English CBC TV is really being hammered by the fragmentation of people's viewing habits, not that any big networks are really doing well at the moment.

I'm curious what becomes of TV in the next 20 years. Do things like Netflix and Amazon Prime effectively kill the idea of a TV network, aside from sports and news (i.e. events-based coverage that doesn't really lend itself to on-demand). 20 years ago, TV was king.

I guess we'll get out the popcorn and watch.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 2:31 PM
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A little off topic, but does anyone watch the SJW News (i mean CBC National News) anymore?
When I was involved back in the 80s and 90s CBC was left leaning (as they always have been) but I wouldn't have considered them openly biased. They are a total joke now, maybe I should clarify that a bit. I don't watch the TV too often, but when I have, what I've seen hasn't been too bad. The website is a total joke. There almost isn't a day that goes by without a story on natives or the alphabet people. They did a poll during the first leadership debate asking what people were concerned about and I believe the economy was over 50% and native issues were something like 5% but they gather coverage that is totally disproportional to their size.

But thankfully the far leftists are eating their own and things are coming slowly back to common sense. Dave Chappelle's Sticks and Stones is a clarion call and should be the manifesto for common sense coming back to reality.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 2:45 PM
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A little off topic, but does anyone watch the SJW News (i mean CBC National News) anymore?

Not one single CBC show on that list.
They should have just given it to Ian Hanomansing and got on with it. He checked all the boxes, would have made the racists happy (the people who care about someone's intersectionality) but most importantly, he was the most experienced, competent and earned and deserved the job.

As for programming, when they fully get away from the agenda based crap and forget the concept of "hip and edgy" they could get back on track. Schitt's Creek and Murdoch Mysteries do well for them. They should just follow Brent Butt's approach about Corner Gas. "We just want to do a good show that people will like" It's as simple as that folks. No agendas, no BS.

Is that old crap from This Hour has 22 Minutes still on. That passed it's best before date over 10 years ago.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 3:03 PM
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I agree. Ian Hanomansingh was the obvious heir apparent and would have earned the position entirely on his merit.

A good New Brunswick boy too - he grew up in Sackville NB and went to Mount Allison University.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 3:21 PM
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A good New Brunswick boy too - he grew up in Sackville NB and went to Mount Allison University.
I was going to say that and he was a helluva debater in his day.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 3:29 PM
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When I was involved back in the 80s and 90s CBC was left leaning (as they always have been) but I wouldn't have considered them openly biased. They are a total joke now, maybe I should clarify that a bit. I don't watch the TV too often, but when I have, what I've seen hasn't been too bad. The website is a total joke. There almost isn't a day that goes by without a story on natives or the alphabet people. They did a poll during the first leadership debate asking what people were concerned about and I believe the economy was over 50% and native issues were something like 5% but they gather coverage that is totally disproportional to their size.

But thankfully the far leftists are eating their own and things are coming slowly back to common sense. Dave Chappelle's Sticks and Stones is a clarion call and should be the manifesto for common sense coming back to reality.
Couldn't agree amore.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 3:32 PM
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The 2 biggest issues in the MacLean's debate on city tv when they polled the audience were 52% economy and 38% climate change. Indigenous issues were at 5% yet it got more than 30% of the air time makes zero sense.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 3:39 PM
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In these cultural wars there is a very interesting thing happening. When Ben Shapiro appeared on Piers Morgan's show on the now leftist CNN it was a total shitshow firestorm because the interview was based on an agenda. Six years later Morgan appears on Ben Shapiro's podcast show (not controlled by a network) and a funny thing happens. We find out that the Liberal Morgan (and I use the term Liberal rather than leftist) and the Conservative Shapiro are not so apart as we may be led to believe. And Morgan comes out smelling like a rose. In fact they seem to agree on most things, so what the hell has happened? Fringe groups have been able to control the mainstream, but it's ending, thankfully.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 3:40 PM
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The 2 biggest issues in the MacLean's debate on city tv when they polled the audience were 52% economy and 38% climate change. Indigenous issues were at 5% yet it got more than 30% of the air time makes zero sense.
That's the poll I was referring to.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 3:53 PM
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people still purchase cable tv?

Anyway, as far as the CBC goes, it fell off the radar last century in Saskatchewan, maybe shows like Little Mosque on the Prairie and Corner Gas (CTV?) became the most popular sitcoms in Canadian history but who dwells on that.

CBC and its reeking of SJW turned off people in this province decades ago. I barely remember that Mansbridge guy on the CBC national news, My grandparents use to listen to Moose Jaw morning presenter Peter Zowski (spelling*) on CBC FM years ago but nobody listens to CBC anymore & has switched over on mass to John Gormley live in Saskatchewan, his topics are just more relevant to the Province
I haven't a clue what's going on in the Canadian 'public' broadcaster these days. Murdoch Mysteries and Dragons Den are the only redeeming shows CBC has had in the 2000s, is it worth over a billion dollars of tax payers money each year?

honestly, once you watch/listen to podcasts from ABC (Australia) or BBC (UK) you'll never think about CBC ever again.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 3:54 PM
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The mainstream media has never been as out of touch to what the public cares about as they are in this era. They have made identity politics their priority above anything else such as jobs, poverty, environment the meat and potatoes issues that most people care about. Just look at Gillette as an example from their demeaning men "toxic masculinity" ad campaign back in January they have already lost $8 billion dollars in customer revolt from it.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 4:33 PM
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Originally Posted by SaskScraper View Post
people still purchase cable tv?

Anyway, as far as the CBC goes, it fell off the radar last century in Saskatchewan, maybe shows like Little Mosque on the Prairie and Corner Gas (CTV?) became the most popular sitcoms in Canadian history but who dwells on that.
Were they more popular than Beachcombers or King of Kensington or any number of Quebec programs?
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 4:35 PM
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It is interesting to see the evolution of media in the 21st century.

I'm speaking purely from an English-speaking vantage here, so I'd like alternate perspectives - I'm not sure if this has happened with other cultures too, or if languages have provided an insulation against this.

Prior to the internet streaming era, one's media content was limited to what was locally available. Thus, the rise of major media conglomerates with broadcast networks that effectively controlled the narrative. So, in Canada you had CBC, CTV and the smattering of US networks.

Cable/satellite somewhat upended it. The fragmentation based on genre started, starting with MTV/CNN and the first generation of specialty channels. But, at the end of the day, the narrative was still controlled by major media corporations.

Now, one can fine-tune one's interests to whatever one wants, thanks to the internet. I can watch car shows on Youtube from Australia. Netflix provides access to shows from around the world.

The things that used to be definitive of a linked English Canadian culture are fading - the Tragically Hip, Corner Gas (fine, there is the animated show), etc. etc. - are footnotes. In a world where one can basically have any fine-tuned content they want, the shared experience thing falls apart. The last show I could discuss with someone outside of my age demographic might have been Game of Thrones. I'm also not saying this is unique to English Canadian culture - the 'shared experience' is falling apart in most of the Anglosphere simply due to its vastness - one can have whatever they want.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 5:11 PM
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Were they more popular than Beachcombers or King of Kensington or any number of Quebec programs?
I don't think so, I believe the poster was a little biased. I hardly believe BBC or strangely enough Australian radio is any better than CBC. BBC despite it's long storied history had put out its own share of crap.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 5:46 PM
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Were they more popular than Beachcombers or King of Kensington or any number of Quebec programs?
Or this cute forgotten little blast from the past pre dating King of Kensington and touted as "Canada's First Sitcom" Whether it was the first is debatable and what people consider a "sitcom" is debatable but this show followed the format and rated very well.



Some background to this, Stu Gillard, the male lead, left after the second season to write for the Sonny and Cher Show, which at the time, was a big deal. Frankly I think this holds up better than some of the American crap of the 70s: Welcome Back Kotter, Chico and the Man etc. The timing of this show was also interesting as it straddled the time between the FLQ crisis and the election of the PQ in Quebec.

Excuse My French Episode 9: Two Up Front

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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 6:09 PM
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Were they more popular than Beachcombers or King of Kensington or any number of Quebec programs?
i'm not familiar with those names or the ones in post above for Canadian sitcoms,
...and Quebec is a niche market, no shows there could ever be considered 'most popular in Canada'.

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Corner Gas is a CTV sitcom created by comedian Brent Butt that ran for six seasons from 2004 to 2009. It is considered one of the most popular and influential Canadian TV comedies ever.

Corner Gas was an instant hit. Each episode of the first season, and even the reruns, drew an average of 1 million viewers — unheard of for a Canadian sitcom. The October 2004 debut of season two drew 1.53 million viewers and cemented the show as a staple on Canadian television, averaging 1.4 million viewers for each new episode over the course of its 107-episode run.

Chicago-based cable network Superstation WGN made a deal to broadcast the show in approximately 70 million US homes. The American debut was in September 2007. When the show expanded into the United States, the reviews were also favourable. The Gannett News Service called Corner Gas “one of the new season’s best shows,” and the San Jose Mercury News called it “a delightful Canadian comedy.”

In April 2008, Butt announced that the sixth season would be the last. On 13 April 2009, a record-breaking audience of 3.02 million people tuned in to see the final episode.
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia....cle/corner-gas

Televised in 26 other countries, Corner Gas has probably been nominated for a few dozen awards including an Emmy.
It was so popular that it even coined phrases like 'staycation' people use even in today's lexicon.
It now has an animated series, I don't know of any other Canadian sitcom that have done that.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 6:16 PM
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Originally Posted by SaskScraper View Post
i'm not familiar with those names or the ones in post above for Canadian sitcoms,
...and Quebec is a niche market, no shows there could ever be considered 'most popular in Canada'.



https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia....cle/corner-gas

Corner Gas has probably been nominated for a few dozen awards including an Emmy.
It was so popular that it even coined phrases people use even in today's lexicon like 'staycation'.
It now has an animated series, I don't know of any other Canadian sitcom that have done that.
I don't know if I'd accept an uncited line from the Canadian Encyclopedia as evidence of Corner Gas' legacy. It was definitely a popular show, but I don't know if it has had the staying power to be considered the "greatest".

Also, to answer your final point: Letterkenny.
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Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 6:17 PM
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I love Corner Gas but long before it the Beachcombers was aired in countries around the world and IIRC the King of Kensington was the first to be sold to an American network market. If you haven't heard of these quintessential shows this might not be a debate you want to carry on with

Forest Rangers (great kids show) had an international following and gave us the first of the coolest Canadian TV characters of all time, Joe Two Rivers. And of course the second was everyone's favourite anti-hero... Relic.

Odd trivia, the title song to this episode became a local hit in Connecticut amongst teens. Frankly the two throwaway TV songs in this episode are better than most songs you'll hear today. Some twenty years later this show made a popular comeback on YTV.

The Forest Rangers - Season 3 Episode 33 - Ojibway Beat

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