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  #41  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 10:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaskScraper
...Gatineau most be more sheltered than I thought...

Here's my impression of this particular page of the thread:

-Hey! how about Quebec Cinema & TV?!!!

crickets*
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Originally Posted by elly63 View Post
Don't go into a fight unarmed fella
I never brought up anything Quebec to begin with, someone delusional did

again the last page's banter speaks for it's self
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  #42  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 10:51 PM
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Your original post reeked of youthful ignorance and you haven't done much to dispel that, carry on, I got a pizza to make.
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  #43  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2019, 10:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaskScraper View Post
Here's my impression of this particular page of the thread:

-Hey! how about Quebec Cinema & TV?!!!

crickets*
Not too familiar with Quebec TV... and what I have seen wasn't anything to write home about. But I've always been impressed with some Quebec cinema. Denys Arcand, Denis Villeneuve (even before he did Hollywood films - ie. Maelstrom, Polytechnique, etc), Jean-Marc Vallée's C.R.A.Z.Y., Jean-Claude Lauzon's Leolo, some Robert LePage (The Far Side of the Moon isn't praised enough) and of course François Girard (The Red Violin and 32 Short Films About Glenn Gould are amongst my absolute favourite films - although may not be thoroughly "Quebec cinema")... to name a few.
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  #44  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 12:47 AM
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The Canadian TV Thread



Beachcombers TV program - First cast photo. Credit: Courtesy CBC Still Photo Collection

Molly (Rae Brown), Nick (Bruno Gerussi), Jesse (Pat John), Hughie (Bob Park), Margaret (Nancy Chapple later Juliet Randall)
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  #45  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 1:14 AM
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Ha the first obviously BC show i can name.
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  #46  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 1:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Berklon View Post
Not too familiar with Quebec TV... and what I have seen wasn't anything to write home about. But I've always been impressed with some Quebec cinema. Denys Arcand, Denis Villeneuve (even before he did Hollywood films - ie. Maelstrom, Polytechnique, etc), Jean-Marc Vallée's C.R.A.Z.Y., Jean-Claude Lauzon's Leolo, some Robert LePage (The Far Side of the Moon isn't praised enough) and of course François Girard (The Red Violin and 32 Short Films About Glenn Gould are amongst my absolute favourite films - although may not be thoroughly "Quebec cinema")... to name a few.
In all honesty Quebec TV isn't exactly "the bomb".

But what it has going for it is relevancy in the cultural diet and lives of people living in its home market.

Though in a sense, it still paved and paves the way for Quebec's movie industry which makes a pretty respectful showing for a society of this size that isn't even its own country.
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  #47  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 1:38 AM
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Originally Posted by SaskScraper View Post
I never brought up anything Quebec to begin with, someone delusional did

again the last page's banter speaks for it's self
What's delusional is to make pronouncements about the "most popular sitcoms in Canadian history" when one has never even heard of the Beachcombers and King of Kensington. (We don't even need to touch upon francophone stuff from Quebec in order to underline the absurdity of this. And you're probably no more able to assess Quebec TV than I am able to do the same for Mongolian TV.)

Generally speaking the truth is that no one around the world outside of a handful of geeks gives a shit about Canadian TV (English or French). But sure, you might stumble upon a Japanese girl or a Russian guy who loved Degrassi, or a Mexican or an Israeli who's a fan of the adaptation of Un gars, une fille.

None of this is more than a tiny drop in the bucket.
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  #48  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 1:57 AM
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While it has been a national sport to decry the quality of Canadian television, as someone who has made a study of it for most of their life, I think the industry is doing just fine. I think we can match anyone for quality, where we might misconstrue that is in interest.

There are and have been many good Canadian shows that I haven't any interest in. Heartland for one, personally I've never seen an episode of Letterkenny.

I don't know about now but in the 90s Canada was the second largest producer in the world of video content and that included the UK and Japan. So we have a fair amount of experience in this business.
I am one of those who is quite critical on here though I'll admit there is some truth to this.

There is a chicken and egg aspect to Canadian TV that means most people don't even give it a chance. (This also extends to movies, but for some reason, not popular music.) With audiences so low, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy that Canadian TV sucks and seemingly almost no one wants to put much effort or resources into it to produce something worthwhile.

When I was younger (before living in Quebec) I was very "into" Anglo-Canadian TV but it was I must say a bit depressing after a while due to a number of factors. While TV is first and foremost a private personal experience in the comfort of your own home part of the fun is also water cooler talk, chatter with friends, but there was almost none of that on offer in any circles I could tap into. There was also basically zero promotional or other coverage of Canadian TV in the entertainment news and media sector. Low ratings also meant that series I got into were often cancelled abruptly after only a couple of episodes or at least before the storyline could run its course. That happens in the US and Quebec TV markets too, but not nearly as frequently. Under these conditions, it's virtually impossible for an audience to become a true devoted fan base for Canadian TV.

Admittedly i am not as plugged in as I used to be but I am attuned enough to know that things have not really changed, and that in spite of efforts to create a bona fide star system (based on TV and movies) in the ROC outside Quebec, it has not really materialized.
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  #49  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 2:19 AM
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Speaking of King of Kensington, here's a 12 year old Mike Myers making an appearance.

Mike Myers

And one show that's actually great TODAY is Schitt's Creek - even with Levy and O'Hara starring, I had my reservations... and was pleasantly surprised and not surprised at the same time. Sucks that they're only going to do 1 more season.
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  #50  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 2:36 AM
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My first, and still favourite, Canadian TV show:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WV2P6P4p6Hg

Sixty years later, that version of "Early One Morning" can still make me tear up.
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  #51  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 2:40 AM
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I have a TV setup where I can view all the local channels in Los Angeles, New York and the main channels from the UK. I think it would surprise many how many Canadian TV shows are being shown internationally.

I was watching Jeopardy the other night and they had a category of Canadian TV shows, the answers were more the modern shows for the American market IIRC than the ones we have been talking about.
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  #52  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 3:04 AM
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My first, and still favourite, Canadian TV show:

Sixty years later, that version of "Early One Morning" can still make me tear up.
The great CBC children's programming was the brain child of Fred Rainsberry, head of children’s programming at the CBC.

The Archive of American Television has an interview with Fred Rogers who talks about this early history (start at 21:00) He speaks about Ernie Coombs here at 19:00
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  #53  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 3:06 AM
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How Mr. Rogers and Mr. Dressup's road trip from Pittsburgh to Toronto changed children's television forever
The recent release of Won’t You Be My Neighbor? has unleashed both a bout of nostalgia and the fear that some aspect of childhood has been lost
Don Gillmor The National Post July 11, 2018

“You take everything north of Windsor. The whole U.S. is mine. Got it?”

“Got it.”

“And remember, every child is special.”

“Whatever.”

Full disclosure: this conversation never took place between Fred Rogers (Mr. Rogers) and Ernie Coombs (Mr. Dressup).

However, in 1962, both men made the drive up Interstate 79, from Pittsburgh to Toronto, for a trip that would eventually change the face of children’s television. At the time, the pair had been working on a show called The Children’s Corner at WQED-TV in Pittsburgh. Fred Rainsberry, head of children’s programming at the CBC, saw Rogers, and invited him to come to Toronto to do his own show. Rogers, in turn, invited Coombs to come along and work as a puppeteer on the new program, which was going to be called Misterogers.

The future of children’s television in one car. What did they talk about? Perhaps the two of them formulated a diabolical plan to dominate children’s programming in two countries for the next three decades, dividing up the continent like a game of high-stakes Risk. More likely, they talked about how this new show would be different than anything on TV. And Canada was the perfect place to do it.

Watching the documentary about the late Fred Rogers, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, he comes across as quintessentially Canadian, or at least the caricature we’re often saddled with: earnest, understated, well-meaning, a bit dull, a nagging sense that we all studied to be Presbyterian ministers, which, in fact, Rogers did. Perhaps those were the qualities Rainsberry saw.

Misterogers ran for four seasons on CBC before Rogers returned to Pittsburgh, taking his sets with him. For the next 33 years, he put on that cardigan and those sneakers, and talked about the joys of neighbourliness until finally retiring in 2001. Coombs stayed in Canada and, after working on the children’s series Butternut Square, created Mr. Dressup, which ran on CBC for 29 years (1967-1996).

Both Rogers and Dressup addressed the camera as if it were a single child rather than a collective. They were quiet and restrained, Rogers to the point of narcosis at times (he once silently watched an egg timer tick off a minute). Years ago, I interviewed Coombs, who said Rogers had told him that “if you’re restrained, the kids will come to you.” And come they did. Both created iconic shows (Mister Rogers’ Neighbourhood was the longest-running children’s show in U.S. history until Sesame Street eclipsed it), and both were successful live performers.

In the Rogers documentary, an interviewee points out, “If you take all of the elements that make good television and do the exact opposite, you have Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. Low production values, simple set, an unlikely star.” The pacing was slow, at times agonizingly so, the theme song sucked and Fred Rogers didn’t have a singing voice (though he was a pretty good pianist).

For all of his earnestness, Rogers was also quietly adventurous: he did a whole week on death — pets, grandparents, etc. After Robert Kennedy’s murder, he talked to preschoolers about assassination. He addressed racism, violence and divorce, all in his soothing ministerial way. There is a prescient clip from 1968 where a puppet, “benevolent monarch” King Friday XIII, decides to build a wall to keep “undesirables” out. He is subsequently talked out of it.

Watching the documentary, it’s hard to imagine a show like Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood being on the air now. You could say that it was a more innocent, peaceful time, though it wasn’t, what with Vietnam, student protests, racial strife, Kent State et al. While these are perilous times, the tribalism and trade chaos is largely taking place offstage. Back then, it was in the streets.

And it’s tempting to say that today’s frantic children’s programming (Phineas and Ferb) reflects our frantic times, though Rogers said that his show was a response to the slapstick violence of TV in the 1960s, and the clubby fascism of shows like The Mickey Mouse Club (though he would never have phrased it that way). It was an anomaly even for its time.

Mr. Dressup used the same formula as Rogers – essentially offering young viewers a version of himself on screen, full of gentle lessons and quirky puppets. Casey was an androgynous four-year-old with a mid-Atlantic accent who lived in a tree house and didn’t have any parents. His dog Finnegan never spoke aloud but whispered to Casey (both operated by Australian puppeteer Judith Lawrence, who retired after 23 seasons, her arms finally giving out).

The natural successor to both shows was Sesame Street, which debuted in 1969, only a year after Rogers’ show, and held to similar progressive ideals, but was fresher, more inventive and much hipper — though virtually everyone was hipper than Fred Rogers.

The recent release of Won’t You Be My Neighbor? has unleashed both a bout of nostalgia and the fear that some aspect of childhood has been lost. But every generation mourns the loss of innocence. Neil Postman argued in The Disappearance of Childhood that childhood was an invention, created by the printing press, or at least literacy. If you were the child of a peasant in the Middle Ages, you would have engaged in the adult world by the age of seven, perhaps even earlier. Your parents would be illiterate, and may never have travelled farther than the next village. At a very early age, you knew what your parents knew because there was so little access to new information. All information was oral, and usually practical — don’t go into the forest.

We are currently approaching the mirror image of that. With the internet, our children now have access to the same information we do, not always an uplifting thought. They spend an increasing amount of time in the forest.

In Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, the innocence is seen in Rogers as much as his audience. Each generation of children faces its own unique challenges, but both Mr. Rogers and Mr. Dressup remind us that there are several childhood qualities that are immutable.
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  #54  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 3:26 AM
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Excuse My French (1974 TV series)

Excuse My French was a Canadian television sitcom, which aired on CTV from 1974 to 1976. Produced by CFCF-TV's Champlain Productions division,the series starred Stuart Gillard and Lisa Charbonneau as Peter and Marie-Louise Hutchins, a mixed anglophone-francophone couple living in Montreal and fighting the disapproval of their families.

The cast also included Earl Pennington as Peter's wealthy publisher father Charles, Paul Berval and Pierrette Beaudoin as Marie-Louise's parents Gaston and Thérèse Sauvé, and Daniel Gadouas as Marie-Louise's Quebec separatist brother Jean-Guy.

The series, produced in Montreal, was judged the best television show of the year by the Montreal branch of the Association of Canadian Television and Radio Artists in 1975.

Although popular in the ratings and with critics, the series ended in 1976 when Gillard moved to the United States to work as a writer for The Sonny & Cher Show.

Eight episodes of this cute show are available from the producer's Youtube channel
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  #55  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 3:36 AM
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Funny story from Clive Endersby, brother of Ralph, who played Chub Stanley, about the popularity of The Forest Rangers in Britain. This was taken from the Forest Rangers Reunion. There is also a nice moment with Gordon Pinsent at 44:14
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  #56  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 3:47 AM
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Kidstuff
Network: CTV Television Network
Broadcast Run: 1975 to 1979
Broadcast Medium: Television

This imaginative and ambitious one-hour Saturday morning children’s program was a major success story for CTV. The lead performers were Doug Springall, Harry Coates, Suzin Schiff and Cathy Cornell; the musical director was Cliff Jones, the choreographer Maryann B. Joffe, and former Ontario Educational Communication Authority staffer Janis Nostbakken was the education supervisor. The series was produced by Bill Hartley.

Each show had songs and skits, performed by the resident cast and a number of adult guest performers, in various settings including a concert stage, a giant pinball machine and even a Tinker Toy set. There were remote video inserts with Canadian celebrities talking about and presenting their favourite parts of Canada, and “what does your mom/dad do?” segments in which kids narrated videos of their parents at their jobs. There were quizzes, magicians, advice segments and dramatizations of typical children’s problems and suggested solutions.

Kidstuff was produced in the studios of CFCF-TV Montreal. The series debuted in September 1975 on Saturdays at 10:00am, where it stayed for four full years. Though only 26 original half-hours were produced, such was the quality and originality of the material that it continued to appeal to new and returning viewers in repeats for the breadth of its four-year span. The series won a gold medal at the International Film and Television Awards in New York, and an ACTRA Award in 1976. An LP was issued featuring many of the songs used during the series.

Pip Wedge - March 2003 Special thanks to Doug Springall

And I have a thing for long, black haired girls ever since
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  #57  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 4:03 AM
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You Can't Do That On Television
Circle Square?
Switchback
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  #58  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 4:11 AM
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I am posting some of this CTV stuff because not only is video rare but actual histories are as well.

The episode I am posting is special because the guest star is the greatest Canadian talent of all time and someone many today have not heard of... Gisele MacKenzie.

No one has come close to the breadth of her talent. You've heard of a triple threat (sing, (she had perfect pitch), dance, act), she was a quintuple threat (sing, dance, act, comedy and play concert level piano and violin)

Beat The Clock
Network: CTV Television Network
Broadcast Run: 1970 to 1974
Broadcast Medium: Television

One of scores of game show formats to be licensed worldwide by the U.S.-based Goodson-Todman organization, a Canadian version of Beat The Clock enjoyed a four-year run in daytime on CTV in the early 1970s. It was hosted by veteran host Jack Narz, and the announcer was perennial game show voice Gene Wood. The game required contestants to perform various stunts within a specified time limit, usually 60 seconds. Celebrity guests took part in each show.

After two years, Jack Narz left, and Gene Wood took over as host and producer for two more years. According to Wood, the show was then cancelled because Mark Goodson of Goodson-Todman didn't want to give CTV 50% of the fees paid by advertisers to have their products featured as prizes on the show.

One interesting feature of the series was that the organist who played for two years on the program was well-known jazz pianist Dick Hyman.

Advertising in Beat The Clock on CTV was sold by the stations, who played the series in various daytime and early evening time periods. The program was first scheduled on CTV in September 1970, and the Clock finally stopped in the fall of 1974.
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  #59  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 4:17 AM
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You Can't Do That On Television
Circle Square?
Switchback
Switchback from Halifax with Stan Johnson had an outrageous rating/share. My memory fails me but it was probably over 90 percent of the audience. Popular host Stan Johnson got the axe (budget cuts?) and the show was never the same.
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  #60  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 4:30 AM
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Switchback from Halifax with Stan Johnson had an outrageous rating/share. My memory fails me but it was probably over 90 percent of the audience. Popular host Stan Johnson got the axe (budget cuts?) and the show was never the same.
Vancouver had a great one too with Stu Jeffries.
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