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  #5661  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 3:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yaletown_fella View Post
I bet that call center work, radiology, low level accounting/bookkeeping and low level legal work will be almost totally automated in a few years before the approvals are there for automated trucking.
I think the future of radiologists is still fairly secure (although an interesting discussion could be made over how many radiologists will be necessary).

Image interpretation is only a portion of the work that radiologists do. In addition to reading radiological examinations, we also:

1) - serve as departmental administrators.
2) - supervise technologists
3) - evaluate requisitions for imaging examinations to ensure that the test ordered is actually indicated
4) - serve as consultants to other physicians if they have any questions regarding a report, or want our advice
5) - perform imaging guided procedures (sometimes as sophisticated as surgical procedures, but performed with needles and catheters rather than scalpels).
6) - attend various multidisciplinary case management rounds at the hospital
7) - teach
8) - patient advocacy
9) - patient interaction (yes, I occasionally talk to a patient regarding the results of their imaging study, and give them bad news).
10) - involvement in imaging equipment purchasing decisions.

These are the things we do that I can think of right off the top of my head. There are probably others.

Even with image interpretation, Watson can be quite sophisticated in detecting findings on the images, but is a lot less sophisticated is determining the significance of these findings. We already use CAD (computer assisted diagnosis) in areas like mammography, but in general, all the CAD program does is flag the finding for your attention. It is up to the radiologist to determine if the finding is significant or not. Many of the findings the CAD program observes are inconsequential, and are ignored by the radiologist in the final report. This is where experience and human judgement come in to play. If we left the whole process up to Watson, we would be performing 10x the number of biopsies as we are doing now.

Finally, once a diagnosis is made (by the radiologist), recommendations are made regarding management and follow up. Should the imaging finding just be followed to see what happens or is treatment or biopsy necessary? What additional imaging modalities are necessary to narrow down the diagnosis? If a biopsy is necessary, how should this be accomplished and by whom?

Many people think that it is the attending physician who makes these decisions. Let me assure you that while the attending is the responsible physician, and makes the final decision, they usually are simply following the advice of the friendly neighbourhood radiologist.

And one last note. The radiologist, when he interprets the imaging study, is the person responsible for determining the acuity of the patient's problem, and whether or not a stat report is necessary. In other words, does the patient's problem constitute a medical emergency? How should the attending physician receive the results of the examination? Is a simple mailed report sufficient, or should the attending recieve a stat fax (with or without a receipt acknowledgement). If the patient has an unanticipated acute life threatening emergency, then we call and talk directly to the attending, while at the same time sending the patient to the ER for management.

Can Watson do all this??????
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  #5662  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 3:59 PM
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Even automated checkouts in stores still have someone manning them.

It makes the checkouts more efficient labour-wise, but there's still someone there to deal with unexpected situations (and to discourage theft).

While automation will grow in scope and scale, there's lots about real life that machines simply don't deal with well.

The mushy, human parts of life will still require humans.
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  #5663  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 4:27 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Can Watson do all this??????
You're probably right in that there will always be human radiologists. But if a significant part of the job is automated, the need for radiologists decreases dramatically. Soon one radiologist will be able to handle volumes that once took several.
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  #5664  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2019, 12:27 AM
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Originally Posted by niwell View Post
That seems likely to me. I was having a conversation about this the other day where we were thinking about how many rules a truck driver has to break to make virtually any delivery in an urban area. Until we can codify what rules are allowed to be bent and what aren't, there's going to be a human at the wheel for the last little bit.
Curious what laws being broken you guys came up with.
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  #5665  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2019, 12:52 AM
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Originally Posted by J.OT13 View Post
HBC took a massive loss! Don't know how much they paid for Lord & Taylor in 2008, but it must have been well over $1 billion considering it was sold two year earlier for $1.1 billion.

It was a colossal dumb move to buy in 2008. It was the start of the recession, department stores had been on the decline for a few decades already.
They are keeping ownership of the real estate assets which are worth a lot more then Lord & Taylor. When you factor in the revenue from what they’ve sold off thus far and the rest of the real estate portfolio they’ll come out with a gain. However, this is far from the original plan they had about the 2 brands back in the day.
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  #5666  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2019, 1:18 AM
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Another article I can't find now says HBC sold off a European department store they bought too a while back.

They intend to put the money into Saks. So could we see more Saks stores in Canada outside of Toronto?
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  #5667  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2019, 7:53 PM
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Hudson's Bay to close Dutch stores: newspaper

BUSINESS NEWS AUGUST 31, 2019

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Canadian retailer Hudson’s Bay will close its Dutch stores by the end of 2019, laying off some 1,400 employees, the Dutch business daily Financieel Dagblad reported on Saturday.

Citing a letter from Hudson’s Bay parent company HBC to undisclosed recipients, the newspaper said the stores in the Netherlands would be shut “due to an ongoing and untenable financial situation”.

Hudson’s Bay has 15 department stores in the Netherlands that have struggled to attract customers and have been operating at a loss.

...

https://ca.reuters.com/article/busin...CN1VL0G5-OCABS
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  #5668  
Old Posted Sep 6, 2019, 2:11 PM
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Ivanhoé Cambridge Provides Montreal Eaton Centre Overhaul Update

September 05, 2019

By Maxime Frechette


The Montreal Eaton Centre on Ste-Catherine Street in Montreal’s downtown core is seeing a $200 million overhaul that will make the centre almost unrecognizable when it is completed before the end of this year. Landlord Ivanhoé Cambridge confirms that about 90% of the space at the new Montreal Eaton Centre has been leased out, and almost all of the stores in the new centre will feature their most updated store concepts. The project will be completed before December of this year.

Confirmed anchors at the new Montreal Eaton Centre will include a massive Time Out Market food hall, as well as French sports retailer Decathlon and large storefronts for retailers such as Sephora, the Gap and Old Navy. Some are speculating that a popular large-format Japanese fashion retailer could be joining the mix, though nothing is confirmed by parties involved (* good sources have confirmed that it is Uniqlo opening their Quebec flagship store fronting Ste-Catherine)



Background: The newly formed Montreal Eaton Centre involves joining two adjacent shopping centres that both have unique histories. The former Complexe Les Ailes was created out of a former Eaton department store flagship store that once spanned nearly one million square feet. When Eaton closed in 1999, the lower floors of the building were converted into a shopping centre called ‘Complexe Les Ailes’, which was anchored by an impressive 225,000 Les Ailes de la Mode department store. After failing to capture shopping dollars, Les Ailes was downsized to a mere 75,000 square feet at the back-end of the Complexe Les Ailes — the chain continued to flounder and morphed into a discount concept before shuttering.

Adjacent to Complexe Les Ailes was the original Eaton Centre Montreal, which was designed to be an adjacent shopping centre for the massive Eaton department store. Such an arrangement was common in cities across Canada, though most have been renamed over the years except for the iconic CF Toronto Eaton Centre.



What’s to Come: The new Montreal Eaton Centre will be highly experiential with ample food and beverage offerings as well as spaces that will change to keep things fresh. Included will be three spaces for brand activations. That includes a ‘central square’ as well as two other areas to host temporary tenants. The overall look of the space will be grander and with broader sight-lines, including large windows overlooking Ste-Catherine Street as well as large atriums to create visibility and connectivity between the floors. The centre’s overall design will be modernized with a colour palette that will be gray and pale white, with touches of wood.

The centre’s Old Navy flagship store will relocate to the back of the second floor in the overhauled complex, while the most recent Old Navy space will become home to a 10,000 square foot restaurant that will overlook the newly pedestrianized McGill College Street. The City of Montreal announced last year that it would transform the block of McGill College into a public square that will become a focal point for the city.



Ste-Catherine Street Flagships: Four large retailers will occupy the Ste-Catherine Street facade of the new Montreal Eaton Centre. Sephora is confirmed to be one of the tenants. The 10,337 square foot store will feature an entrance from Ste-Catherine Street, as well as from within the shopping centre itself. The store opens later this month.

The Gap will be another tenant with a prominent Ste-Catherine Street frontage at the Montreal Eaton Centre. Another street-facing tenant has yet to be announced for a two-level corner space facing Ste-Catherine Street.

Forever 21 recently closed at the Montreal Eaton Centre with a Ste-Catherine Street doorway, and reopened in a location nearby. A new tenant will occupy the former Forever 21 space at Montreal Eaton Centre space, which will feature two retail levels that will include frontage onto Ste-Catherine Street. Whispers during a tour last week included a rumour that Japanese retailer Uniqlo might be the tenant to take that space, though nothing was confirmed by Ivanhoé Cambridge. Sources confirm that Uniqlo has signed a lease on Ste-Catherine Street and the former Forever 21 space would be a logical choice. As well, for the past several months Uniqlo has been advertising jobs in the Montreal market.



Time Out Market: The highly anticipated Time Out Market will span 40,000 square feet and will consist of 16 restaurants and three bars — one will focus on beer, one on wine, and one on cocktails. There will be two stations for soft drinks, a demonstration kitchen with 27 seats, a retail space selling local products and clothing such as t-shirts, and a cooking academy. Included in the mix will be a breakfast counter where breakfast will be served all day.

Each of the restaurants in the Time Out Market will operate on one-year leases and will offer between eight and 10 dishes, which will generally be priced between $8 and $20. The Time Out Market has control over pricing, though there may be exceptions for special seasonal dishes.

A wide range of food options at the Time Out market will include vegetarian, Mexican, Thai, pizza and other offerings.



The space will aim to be zero waste with porcelain plates and bowls as well as reusable cutlery and glasses. Any aluminum used will be recycled.

The Time Out market will include impressive stainless-steel kitchens as well as glossy grey ceramic walls, concrete columns, and hardwood flooring. Uniformity will be key, with each restaurant’s branding being in the same black font.

What’s interesting is that the Time Out market won’t be accepting cash for purchases, except at its bars. Instead, credit and debit cards and mobile payments will the primary payment methods in the massive new space. Cash will also not be accepted in the mall’s new Decathlon store — the goal is to get customers moving quickly through both spaces. Mobile payments are expected to take hold in Canada quickly and retailers at Montreal Eaton Centre will be at the forefront.



The Time Out Market will have a seating capacity of 550 and will utilize elongated wooden tables, with a further 225 seats contained within an indoor terrace where alcohol will be permitted. The Time Out Market will be open until 9:00pm daily, while its bar space will be open until midnight.

Recently announced restaurants at the Time Out Market Montreal include: Burger T by Normand Laprise, Montreal Plaza by Charles-Antoine Crete and Cheryl Johnson, Hunting & Fishing Club by Claude Pelletier, Romados (roasted Portuguese chicken), Restaurant Moleskine (Neapolitan pizza), Red Tiger (Vietnamese), Il Miglio (fresh Italian pasta), and Hof Sucrée (dessert) by Hof Kelsten.



Landlord Ivanhoé Cambridge is increasing its focus on food and beverage offerings at its centres, which have seen a 12% increase in sales over the past year. The nearby Place Ville Marie mixed use complex, also managed by Ivanhoé Cambridge, will be getting a ‘gourmet biergarten’ that was reported on by Retail Insider last year.

What’s interesting, as well, is the former ninth floor restaurant in the former Eaton department store could re-open under a new service provider. Upgrades will be required for the space that closed about 20 years ago with the closure of Montreal’s massive Eaton flagship store, which was at one time the largest in the company in terms of square footage.



Decathlon: The two-level Decathlon store will span more than 38,000 square feet over two floors. As a comparison, the Brossard Decathlon location in suburban Montreal spans more than 60,000 square feet on one level. The Montreal Eaton Centre Decathlon location will feature two entry points. One will be on the first floor via a central corridor, and another through the Time Out Market itself. Decathlon will include window displays showcasing its wares on Maisonneuve Boulevard, though it will not include an entrance onto the street. For the first time, Ivanhoé Cambridge and Decathlon provided renderings of the entrance to the new store for Retail Insider and other media.

At Decathlon, as mentioned above, only debit and credit cards will be accepted, as well as mobile payments — sales associates will have mobile terminals to process payments so there will be no registers to line up at, other than several self-service registers at the front of the store. About 50 people will work at the new Montreal Eaton Centre Decathlon store and its e-comerce site is being launched this month.



Retail Insider will continue to report on the progression of construction at Montreal Eaton Centre, which is part of an incredible transformation of downtown Montreal. Other adjacent shopping centres, many connected via underground walkways, are also seeing updates. La Maison Simons, for example, recently opened a standalone home store in the shopping complex below its Ste-Catherine Street storefront.

The Hudson’s Bay department store, located east of the Montreal Eaton Centre, recently saw upgrades to its main level beauty hall that includes more prestige brands in a beautiful space. Sources say that at least the ground floor of that Bay flagship will be renovated over the next year, though plans for a proposed 200,000 square foot Saks Fifth Avenue flagship store at the back end of the 650,000 square foot building has been shelved, according to reports. As well, the overhaul to the highly anticipated Holt Renfrew Ogilvy at 1307 Ste-Catherine Street West is ongoing and is expected to be completed by the spring of 2020, introducing some of the world’s leading luxury brands to the market in a collection of leased shop-in-store concessions.
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  #5669  
Old Posted Sep 6, 2019, 11:31 PM
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I laugh when they try to re-brand a mall food court as a "food hall" or "dining hall."

While in Calgary, I noticed at the CF Chinook Centre that they use the term "food hall." It seemed a bit much to call it that.

Last edited by Loco101; Sep 7, 2019 at 3:03 AM.
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  #5670  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2019, 1:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
I laugh when they try to re-brand a mall food court as a "food hall" or "dining hall."

While in Calgary, I noticed a the CF Chinook Centre that they use the term "food hall." It seemed a bit much to call it that.
At least in this case, it's not going to be the same old large chain flashy signs we see in every other food court in the country. I also like the idea of them being on one year leases
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  #5671  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2019, 6:19 AM
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Hudson's Bay ditches 300 brands in quest for cool factor

The Bay is bringing in more upscale brands to win back customers

Bloomberg News
Sandrine Rastello
September 12, 2019


Hudson’s Bay Co. is doing a large-scale dust off in Canada.

The owner of Saks Fifth Avenue has booted out 300 “unproductive” brands from its Canadian department store chain, known locally as “The Bay.” It’s brought 100 new brands to “reset” the assortment this season, ranging from fast fashion staple Mango to high-end, sustainability-focused designs of New Zealander Maggie Marilyn, whose plaid pants sell for $570 (US$432).

Other additions include Anthropologie’s home goods, outdoors-focused L.L. Bean, as well as edgier designers such as Copenhagen-based Birger Christensen’s Rotate.

...

https://business.financialpost.com/n...or-cool-factor
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  #5672  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2019, 6:25 AM
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I think the Bay really needs to bring some consistency to their stores. Some are really well kept despite looking dated, good selection of brands, well-merchandised and then others are just dirty, poor layout, crappy brands, no salespeople, messy, etc. The Metrotown store for instance is in one of the best performing malls in Vancouver and Canada and the selection is just awful, they could really bring in some better brands as there is no competition in the mall and make it look better, they often have boxes of pillows just thrown in an aisle or cheap looking tables with messy piles of towels and the clothes are just not cared for or merchandised at all just a mess and no sales people to be found. If they fixed that store up they could do really well for instance. I am sure its the same across Canada, most stores have been neglected with focus on a few flagships which isn't helping the overall brand.

Hudson’s Bay Co losses widen on lower sales and heavy discounts

Over the past few years the iconic retailer has been closing stores and selling businesses

Canadian department store operator Hudson’s Bay Co reported a wider second-quarter loss on Thursday, hurt by several shuttered stores, heavy discounting and declining sales at the retailer’s namesake brand.

The Toronto-based company has been fighting a tough retail environment as e-commerce behemoth Amazon.com Inc and other department stores such as Macy’s and Nordstrom Inc continue to swoop up more customers with discounts. “The promotional activity in luxury was exceptionally intense in the second quarter and a notable change from the first quarter,” chief executive Helena Foulkes said.

Brands Saks Fifth Avenue and Saks OFF 5TH, however, performed well in the quarter. Comparable sales at Saks Fifth Avenue rose 0.6 per cent and that at Saks OFF 5TH climbed 3.4 per cent.

...

https://business.financialpost.com/n...quarterly-loss
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  #5673  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2019, 4:54 PM
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Agree 100%. Hudson's Bay stores vary massively from each other. The flagship Toronto store Queen/Yonge is worth the trip yet the one a 30 minute walk north Bloor/Yonge is a depressing hole. They need a consistent shopping experience regardless of what outlet you go to.

Adding more unique and higher end products is smart but they'd do well to also copy what Dutch retailer HEMA is doing. HEMA has 32,000 products that they design themselves so you can't get it anywhere else. Hudson's Bay is a far higher end retailer but they'd be wise to increase the number of products that one can only get at one of their stores. They do have their own brands but they're all too low end (Beaumark) and/or lack any design sense (Mantles). They need to hire the best design talent on the planet to create brands/designs that resonate.
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  #5674  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2019, 7:33 PM
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Even their more focused and upmarket stores are a bit of a mess. The HBC flagship in Granville in Vancouver is clean enough but it's kind of a depressing place to be, the experience is kind of all over the place. Some of the floors are very clean and exude a bit of luxury while others are full of scuff marks and piles of clearance merchandise.

Good on them on finally ditching the "losing" brands. With the advent of the internet, ease of access of information and the aging of the millennial cohort that grew up with this access (can't believe I'm saying that now...time goes by quickly), there's just no excuse for stocking completely unrecognizable brands with no perceived consumer value. Tastes and fashion shift and with how cheap decent looking clothing (fast fashion) has become, the low-mid tier market just has no appeal anymore.
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  #5675  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 3:07 AM
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I don't see HBC existing much longer as it does today. Down the road I can see it being a smaller store located in tourist destinations and airports and in the largest shopping centres as a much smaller sized store. The focus would be on certain items they are well know for and some of the stereotypical Canadian stuff. (blankets, clothing designed specifically for them which includes the Olympic items)

I can also see the stores being sold off and bought by a Canadian-based company. Probably the Westons. Department stores are becoming a thing of the past.
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  #5676  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 5:31 AM
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Here's A Look Inside Vancouver's Stunning New Hermès Location (PHOTOS)

Ladies and gents, the orange paper is gone.

Britanny Burr
September 13



Hermés Canada


Hermés Canada


Hermés Canada



Hermés Canada



Hermés Canada

https://www.narcity.com/news/ca/bc/v...made-of-photos
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  #5677  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 5:44 AM
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Great. More overpriced crap
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  #5678  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2019, 6:00 AM
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UK Toy Retailer ‘Hamleys’ to Enter Canada with Stores
September 12, 2019

https://www.retail-insider.com/retai...da-with-stores

no indication of when or where yet
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  #5679  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2019, 2:43 AM
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Forever 21 has filed for bankruptcy (closing 178 of its 800 some stores) and will cease operations in all its 44 locations in Canada.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/for...nada-1.5302335
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  #5680  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2019, 7:00 AM
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their stores around Vancouver are all large, that will leave a huge amount of space to fill.
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