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  #61  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2016, 7:37 PM
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Originally Posted by NYguy View Post
Certainly above 1,000 at least.



WOWOW!! Look at the base! That's going to be a wonder of engineering when this gets erected.
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  #62  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2016, 3:42 PM
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One qualm - does it have to be green?


http://memesvault.com/kermit-the-frog-meme-blank/




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Originally Posted by CIA View Post
WOWOW!! Look at the base! That's going to be a wonder of engineering when this gets erected.

A look at how it will be built over the senior apartments...








Two Bridges Senior Apartments, 80 Rutgers Slip.
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  #63  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2016, 2:28 AM
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Can someone please enlighten me; Perhaps I've simply just missed it, but why on earth are they building an Billion dollar supertall around this POS run-of-the-mill senior housing project?
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  #64  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2016, 2:58 AM
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^ The world wants to know.

It does appear to be a particularly absurd case of appeasement.
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  #65  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2016, 3:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Skyguy_7 View Post
Can someone please enlighten me; Perhaps I've simply just missed it, but why on earth are they building an Billion dollar supertall around this POS run-of-the-mill senior housing project?
Forget about the senior housing... they are building over this 1 floor shack as well:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/24...!4d-73.9901649
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  #66  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2016, 2:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Skyguy_7 View Post
Can someone please enlighten me; Perhaps I've simply just missed it, but why on earth are they building an Billion dollar supertall around this POS run-of-the-mill senior housing project?
It's really simple. The same reason every tall residential has gone up where they have - the land.



Quote:
The new residential and retail complex will be built on property currently owned by the Two Bridges Neighborhood Council and Settlement Housing Fund.....

During the briefing, held at Stern’s office near Union Square, the developers offered a first look at plans.......They’re envisioning about 600 rental apartments in the dramatic tower, approximately 150 of which will be set aside as permanently affordable units (25% of the total).

Back in 2012, Little Cherry Development, LLC agreed to purchase a parcel, known as 235-247 Cherry St., from Two Bridges Neighborhood Council and Settlement Housing Fund. A one-story building on the site was once home to the Pathmark Pharmacy. But the $4 million deal fell apart, and Little Cherry sued the not-for-profit groups for alleged breach of contract. That lawsuit has not yet been resolved.

The property owners now say they’ve come up with a solution that isn’t dependent on the courts. JDS and SHoP have agreed to purchase around 500,000 square feet of development rights from the organizations for $51 million. The project is being accomplished by demolishing a small community center on Cherry Street, nestling the 900-foot tower alongside an existing senior housing building and cantilevering a portion of the new construction over the old pharmacy property. The footprint for the tower will be about 9,000 square feet.

Such is the state of building in New York now. As people in neighborhoods complain about 10 and 15 story buildings going up, the neighborhoods that can build taller will have to accomodate it. People have to go somewhere. And we'll see solutions like this.

I still say the seniors should be relocated during that construction. At least those that want to.
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  #67  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2016, 10:06 PM
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Proposed 1,000-foot-tall apartment tower in lower Manhattan put on hold

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The Department of City Planning has put the brakes on a nearly 1,000-foot-tall apartment tower in lower Manhattan.

In a letter written last month, the department alerted JDS Development that it will not approve plans that would allow the builder to construct an 80-story rental building at 80 Rutgers Slip, on the corner of Cherry Street, until a lawsuit involving a neighboring site is resolved.

"It has come to our attention that rights to use the floor area required for this project is in dispute," wrote Edith Hsu-Chen, the director of City Planning's Manhattan office, in a letter to Michael Stern, the chief executive of JDS.

Hsu-Chen said that JDS' application for a minor modification to a previously approved neighborhood redevelopment plan would be placed "on hold" until pending litigation is resolved.

Developers Gary Spindler and Roy Schoenberg are suing nonprofits Settlement Housing Fund and Two Bridges Neighborhood Council for backing out of their deal to sell to them 235 Cherry St., a site adjacent to JDS' project. Instead, Settlement Housing Fund and Two Bridges Neighborhood Council worked out a separate deal to sell development rights from 235 Cherry St. to JDS. The extra rights would allow JDS to build its 500,000-square-foot tower at 80 Rutgers Slip.

Attorneys from Herrick Feinstein, the law firm representing Spindler and Schoenberg in the suit, said the deal with JDS would deprive Spindler and Schoenberg of the development rights they need for the roughly 300,000-square-foot mixed-use project they are planning at 235 Cherry St. JDS' project, a skyscraper propped on stilts that would literally sit above an existing 10-story apartment building, would cantilever over 235 Cherry.

JDS is not named in the litigation, but Raymond Hannigan, an attorney at Herrick said that Spindler and Schoenberg are "examining all of our rights respecting JDS and these latest developments. Our purpose is to enforce the sale contract and enforce the development rights."

In April, Settlement Housing's chief executive, Alexa Sewell, reportedly said she was "100% certain" that the organization and Two Bridges would win the suit brought by Spindler and Schoenberg.

"We are working to clear up any questions and are confident both that the application will move forward consistent with DCP procedures and that the pending litigation will be resolved in our favor," said a Settlement Housing Fund spokesperson.

The letter from City Planning is the latest action taken by New York to stop or delay construction of a tall residential tower. The city Department of Buildings stopped work on a midtown project planned by developer Fosun and an ultra-luxury tower planned by DDG on the Upper East Side.
===========================
http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...nhattan-put-on
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  #68  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2016, 10:22 PM
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That lawsuit has to be resolved, another bump in the road. The city is trying to avoid approving anything that could later serve as an embarrasment, with recent revelations.
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  #69  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2016, 1:06 AM
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Its good that they have about a quarter of the apartments as affordable. I'm concerned with the rest. I hope the price range is from 500k to 4.5 million or so if they are to buy or if its rental, $2200-6000/month. Something along those lines. Demand is red hot for that range. Just something to increase the probability that it will be built to super tall status or so. They can't get too greedy with the pricing. Market is kinda saturated with respect to ultra luxury.
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  #70  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2016, 2:20 PM
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http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/20...evelopers.html

Dueling “Two Bridges” Plans, Dueling PR Offensives From Developers






Quote:
Developer Roy Schoenberg is launching an all-out public relations campaign as his battle rages on for control of a Cherry Street building site.

The Department of City Planning in the past week put a temporary halt to all land use applications at 235-247 Cherry St. until a civil lawsuit is concluded. Two not-for-profit groups, Two Bridges Neighborhood Council and Settlement Housing Fund, announced in April the sale of development rights to JDS Development Group. The firm plans to build a thousand foot residential tower on a portion of the contested property. Schoenberg is suing the not-for-profit organizations, claiming they failed to honor a separate 2012 agreement.

Schoenberg, who owns the Park-It Management Corp., met last week with local elected officials to describe plans for a 47-story residential tower he wants to put up on a portion of a single story building that once housed a Rent-a-Center facility. The firm owns a long-term lease for that vacant space. The company also hopes to brief Community Board 3 on the project in the fall — at the same time JDS goes before CB3’s land use committee for a similar purpose. So there’s a possibility that the dueling developers will be facing off on the Lower East Side on one awkward evening in September.

In recent court filings, Schoenberg’s legal team said they were taken aback after reading about the deal with JDS Development in The Lo-Down on April 27. In a June 21 letter to state judge Jeffrey Oing, they wrote, “(The plaintiffs) appear to have transferred away to developer Michael Stern (JDS’s CEO) valuable development and other rights,” in an “apparent transaction” that “would completely and directly undermine any award” Schoenberg might receive as a result of the lawsuit. The lawyers seemed especially miffed at a statement made in our story by Alexa Sewell, president of Settlement Housing Fund. When asked about the pending lawsuit, she said the not-for-profit groups were, “100% certain we are going to prevail.”

Schoenberg and Michael Kramer, the firm’s director of real estate, talked with The Lo-Down yesterday afternoon. Referring to the JDS team’s interview with this publication and to meetings held with residents in buildings adjacent to the development site, Kramer said, “We were not holding press conferences” about our project.” But given the events of the past several weeks, Kramer said, they have decided that the local community should have the opportunity to weigh both proposals.

Last Thursday, Schoenberg and his team met with State Assembly member Alice Cancel, State Sen. Daniel Squadron and representatives of the Manhattan Borough President and City Council member Margaret Chin. Trever Holland, tenant association president at Two Bridges Tower, was also present (his building borders the proposed development site).

The developers said their project would encompass 330,000 square feet and include market rate apartments plus 70 units of affordable housing, as well as a community center and offices for Two Bridges Neighborhood Council. [The JDS plan would create 150 affordable units.]

While court documents indicated the sale price was $4 million, Schoenberg said that figure is misleading. It assumed the construction of a much smaller building than what is now anticipated. Kramer added, “The idea is that we’re all on the same time. We can arrive at a fair price.” [JDS is paying $51 million and planning a 500,000 square foot project.]

In court, Schoenberg has argued that Two Bridges and Settlement Housing are in violation of their 2012 contract. It required the developer to secure city and state approvals for the project within a specific period of time. The not-for-profit groups terminated the deal in December of 2014, saying Schoenberg failed to fulfill this requirement. But he contended that the organizations did not hold up their end of the bargain — which required them to help in winning those approvals.

The JDS plan calls for cantilevering the tower over portions of the one-story commercial building and a low-income senior rental building. But the footprint of the tower would be different than the one envisioned in Schoenberg’s proposal. Settlement Housing and Two Bridges are convinced that this design work-around is legally permissible. “The lawsuit does not prevent us from doing this,” Two Bridges’ Victor Papa told us in April. In their letter to the judge, Schoenberg’s attorneys strongly disagreed. “In addition to guaranteeing their victory before this court,: they wrote, “defendants tout that they have come up with a solution to maneuver around this very action pending before the court.”

JDS, of course, sees the matter very differently. A spokesperson provided us with the following statement yesterday afternoon:

As a tenant, Little Cherry (Schoenberg’s company) has no contractual rights to develop the site, and we expect that the lawsuit it has filed asserting such rights will be dismissed as wholly without merit. The owner of the site has made clear that it has no interest in pursuing a project with Little Cherry and, as such, any proposal it puts forth has no basis in reality. We believe these actions are an attempt to harm two longstanding non-profits and undermine a project that Settlement Housing Fund and Two Bridges Neighborhood Council wholeheartedly support. Our proposed development will bring much-needed affordable housing, new retail options, resiliency upgrades, and open space to the community—and we will see it through to its successful completion.


Local elected officials, led by Council member Chin, have asked the Department of City Planning to order a ULURP for several sites in the Two Bridges area, including 235-247 Cherry St. It’s something residents have called for in response to what they see as over-development in the gentrifying neighborhood. The ULURP would require community board review of the various development plans and approval by the City Council. Schoenberg supports a master planning process to address infrastructure needs. Previously, JDS declined to comment regarding Chin’s request of the city, although a spokesperson said the firm is committed to working with other developers to address community concerns.

Kramer spoke briefly last month with former CB3 Chairperson Gigi Li about an appearance before the board. But no official request has been made, according to District Manager Susan Stetzer. CB3’s new chair, Jamie Rogers, indicated yesterday, that he’s open to a presentation from Schoenberg’s firm. “The board hopes to hear as much information as possible,” he said, “on proposed developments in the neighborhood.”


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  #71  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2016, 11:33 AM
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City Reviewing Two Plans to Curb Influx of High-Rises on LES Waterfront

Quote:
The city is currently looking into two proposals aimed at addressing the rapid-fire development of the Two Bridges waterfront — one that would cap building heights and another that would make it more difficult for developers to build high-rises — as residents grow increasingly anxious over the influx of super-tall buildings in their neighborhood.

The Department of City Planning is reviewing a proposal from elected officials that calls for a set of planned waterfront high-rises to be viewed as “major modifications” that would go through the city’s Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) — an extensive, seven-month approval process requiring review from the local community board, the Borough Board, City Council, and the mayor himself.

Under the current zoning, three prospective large-scale developments slated for the waterfront are just “minor modifications,” meaning they could be approved by DCP without undergoing the thorough review process of a ULURP. But local elected officials say that given the significant impact the developments would have on the surrounding community, the categorization needs to change.

“We firmly believe that there are strong technical and legal arguments in favor of treating these applications as a new ULURP, but equally important, these new projects will represent the most significant development in the Two Bridges neighborhood in over a generation,” reads the letter to DCP officials, which was first reported by The Lo-Down. “The community at large, through the ULURP process, deserves a role in shaping its future.”

The letter is signed by Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez, State Assemblywoman Alice Cancel, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, State Senator Daniel Squadron, and Councilwomen Margaret Chin and Rosie Mendez.

A 77-story residence from JDS Development — going in next to Extell’s 80-story One Manhattan Square, which is allowed under the parcel’s current zoning without approval from DCP — has already drawn the ire of the surrounding community, who say it will bring a host of quality of life issues to the densely-populated area.
==============================
https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/201...les-waterfront
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  #72  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2016, 4:15 PM
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Developers move to block builder of 1,000-foot tall tower in lower Manhattan

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A Manhattan-based development firm is trying to stop a 1,000-foot tall luxury apartment tower from going up along the Manhattan waterfront, between the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges.

Little Cherry, run by Gary Spindler and Roy Schoenberg, filed a lawsuit Friday in Manhattan state Supreme Court against the project's developer Michael Stern, head of JDS Development. Spindler and Schoenberg claim that they are entitled to the development rights that Stern is using for his project—an 80-story, luxury condo tower at 80 Rutgers Slip, on the corner of Cherry Street.

A spokeswoman for JDS Development said that the firm has not received the lawsuit so it could not comment.

The dispute dates back to 2012, when Little Cherry signed a contract to buy the development rights and 235 Cherry St., adjacent to Stern's site, from nonprofits Settlement Housing Fund and Two Bridges Neighborhood Council. Little Cherry planned a project that they said would have included affordable and market-rate apartments. But in 2014, Settlement Housing Fund and Two Bridges Neighborhood Council terminated its contract with Little Cherry and later agreed to sell unused development rights to Stern.

Little Cherry has already sued the nonprofits, alleging that they improperly terminated their contract and instead agreed to sell its development rights to Stern instead.

Friday's lawsuit accuses Stern of helping the nonprofits undermine their contract. In addition, because Little Cherry holds a ground lease on 235 Cherry St., it argues that it has to approve the sale of development rights to Stern and since Little Cherry does not plan on giving its consent, the firm argues that the deal is not valid.

"Little Cherry is claiming that, as a tenant, it has veto power, and that JDS is unlawfully interfering with its rights," said Raymond Hannigan, a partner at law firm Herrick, Feinstein representing the plaintiffs.

The developers are asking a judge for a monetary award and to prevent Stern from proceeding or pitching his project to the city or community. Last month, Crain's reported that the Department of City Planning was putting Stern's project on hold until the first lawsuit is resolved.
============================
http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...tower-in-lower
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  #73  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2016, 7:18 PM
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Well... hopefully that gets sorted out soon.
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  #74  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2016, 9:47 PM
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http://therealdeal.com/2016/08/15/ci...dges-projects/

City Planning rejects pleas to force ULURP on Two Bridges projects
JDS' Cherry Street project won't have to face land-use review






August 15, 2016


Quote:
Three projects planned for Two Bridges have narrowly dodged a lengthy land use procedure.

The Department of City Planning rejected a request to require three massive towers to go through the Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP), which would have required the projects to get approval from the community board, the borough president and the City Council.

In a letter dated Aug. 11, Carl Weisbrod wrote that while the changes to the neighborhood were significant, they did not “require any new waivers or zoning actions,” the Lo-Down reported.

This means JDS Development Group’s 247 Cherry Street, L+M Development and CIM Group’s 260 South Street and the Starrett Corporation’s 271-283 South Street won’t have to go through the land use process.

In June, City Council member Margaret Chin and others urged the city to create a master plan for the neighborhood, in light of several projects planned for the area. In July, the Lo-Down reported that preliminary plans for the two South Street projects would bring more than 2,100 new residential units to the neighborhood and would together span 1.7 million square feet, nearly the same size as the Essex Crossing project.
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  #75  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2016, 9:59 PM
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To the NIMBYS concerned with rising rents...

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  #76  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2016, 10:24 PM
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^ This is pretty close to the river, sooo....

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  #77  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2016, 11:34 PM
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I love Carl Weisbrod.
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  #78  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2016, 7:50 PM
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Followup: JDS Development’s Tower in Two Bridges Area is No Longer “On Hold”


Quote:
Earlier this week we reported that there was confusion in the Two Bridges neighborhood over the fate of a development site at 247 Cherry St. Today there’s more clarity about the situation.

JDS Development Group agreed to purchase the parcel and development rights this past spring from Two Bridges Neighborhood Council and Settlement Housing Fund. The developer plans a 77-story tower with about 600 rental apartments. JDS and the not-for-profit groups are being sued by another firm, Little Cherry LLC, which signed a 2012 deal to build on a neighboring parcel.

Back in July, a spokesperson for the Department of City Planning told us the city would not move forward with any applications for the site until the legal dispute was resolved. At the same time, Crain’s cited a letter from agency’s Manhattan director, advising the developers the the applications were on hold.

But a source familiar with the project told The Lo-Down recently that the JDS application is now moving forward with City Planning.

On July 8, City Planning received written notice from the not-for profit organizations that they were withdrawing as co-applicants with Little Cherry. On August 23, Edith Hsu-Chen, director of DCP’s Manhattan office, confirmed in a letter that the city would “recommence a review” of the application filed by JDS. [You can read the full letter below].

Next month, city planning staff will brief Community Board 3’s land use committee about an environmental review in the Two Bridges area. The agency denied a request from Council member Chin for a full land use review.
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  #79  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2016, 12:20 AM
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I wonder if this is still on for 2018. I would love to see this, and 260 South Street start to see foundation work by spring of 2017. Eh, might be a little aggressive, but the change will be worth it.
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  #80  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2016, 2:10 AM
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http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...state-20160825

City Planning moves forward with application for 1,000-foot-tall residential tower


by Daniel Geiger
August 25, 2016


Quote:
The Department of City Planning is moving forward with an application to build a new 1,000-foot tall residential tower in the fast-growing neighborhood just north of the area between the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges.

JDS Development Group is arranging a deal to build the spire, which will rise on top of a pair of stilts that will elevate it above an existing 10-story apartment building at 80 Rutgers Slip. The ambitious development has been embroiled in litigation that has held up the developer's application with City Planning.

Developers Gary Spindler and Roy Schoenberg are suing the nonprofits Settlement Housing Fund and the Two Bridges Neighborhood Council, which own the Rutgers Slip site and an adjacent parcel at 235 Cherry St. Spindler and Schoenberg allege that the nonprofits reneged on an agreement to sell them 235 Cherry St. so they could instead strike a more lucrative $50 million deal to sell the air rights from the site to JDS Development. The additional air rights would allow JDS to build its 80-story residential tower, while Spindler and Schoenberg need the same air rights for their proposed roughly 300,000-square-foot mixed-use project.

City Planning initially declined to review JDS Development's application for what is called a minor modification, citing the two competing projects and the ongoing litigation.

In a letter sent to JDS Development on Tuesday, City Planning reversed course and said it will now take a look at JDS' request because an application for Spindler and Schoenberg's development had been withdrawn.
While that project appears to be stalled, Spindler and Schoenberg's lawsuit against the nonprofits continues in State Supreme Court. The pair are suing to enforce their contract with the nonprofits to buy 235 Cherry St. so they can move forward and build their project. Separately, they are suing JDS Development for interfering in their efforts to strike a deal with the Two Bridges Neighborhood Council and Settlement Housing Fund.

Both JDS and Spindler and Schoenberg declined to comment.
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