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  #241  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2016, 3:35 AM
maccoinnich maccoinnich is offline
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Mini monzenmachi goes up in steel



On April 1, 2017, the ticket booth to the Portland Japanese Garden will move to the bottom of the hill, near the Washington Park tennis courts. That’s because the old area where the shuttle buses turned around at the top of the service road has been flattened to make way for three new buildings which could transform the tourist attraction into a huge draw.

Between 600,000 and 650,000 visitors a year visit the free International Rose Test Garden, but they don’t all make it the extra fifty yards (and 10 bucks) to the Japanese Garden. (Washington Park itself attracts 3 million.)

It is widely considered a great traditional Japanese garden, probably the most authentic in the United States. It hopes to cement that after the $33.5 million Portland Japanese Garden Expansion project.

The architect of this new cultural village, Kengo Kuma, has said he thinks the 5.5 acre garden is perfect and does not want to touch it. Instead he is creating a mini monzenmachi or gate-front town. This is a site for activity usually found outside shrines and other attractions in Japan. In Portland’s case, the activities will be many and various, and they won’t include people hot off the tour bus buying tickets.
...continues at the Business Tribune.
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  #242  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2016, 6:43 AM
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City Council had a work session today on the idea of moving Portland Parks & Recreation admin staff out of the Portland Building, and into a new building adjacent to the Gateway Discovery Park. Charlie Hales hated it, though Amanda Fritz was keen to point out that Ted Wheeler was receptive to the idea. Nick Fish, Steve Novick and Dan Saltzman were a little warmer, though all had some level of skepticism.

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  #243  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2016, 4:54 PM
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I've said it before and I'll say it again. But gateway I think in the next 4-5 years will be a really improved and next hip area in this city
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  #244  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2016, 7:21 PM
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Swan Island May Soon Have the Boat Launch of Your Dreams
But Some Say the City's Plan to Pay for It Is Shoddy



WHEN SUMMER HITS in Portland, aspiring mariners set a course for Swan Island.

The North Portland industrial enclave, an island in name only these days, hosts one of the few public boat launches within city limits. That launch and an accompanying dock quickly fill to capacity when the weather turns balmy.

So the city wants to spruce the thing up. As part of a freshly approved deal [PDF] between the Portland Bureau of Environmental Services and Portland Parks and Recreation (PP&R), the parks bureau is going to take ownership of the run-down launch, pouring an estimated $600,000 into making repairs and bolstering security.

It's a project the cash-strapped parks bureau might balk at in other instances. But in this case, it plans to pay for the fixes from a special pot of cash. It told Portland City Council the money would come from "system development charge" (SDC) funds—fees the bureau collects from new development citywide, designed to help ensure it can expand the parks system in a fast-growing city.
...continues at the Portland Mercury.
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  #245  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2016, 7:03 PM
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Dangermond Keane Architecture got the contract for the Forest Park Entry. On City Council agenda next week:

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*826 Authorize a contract with Dangermond Keane Architecture, LLC to provide planning, design and construction administration services for improvements to Forest Park Entry and Nature Center at a not to exceed amount of $1,653,240 (Ordinance) 10 minutes requested
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  #246  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2016, 6:41 AM
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Developers Just Sued the City—Again—Over Fees To Pay For City Parks



Portland Parks and Recreation did itself a solid last year: The oft-cash-strapped bureau ramped up the fees it charges developers to pay for the strain brought by new workers and residents flocking to the city.

To hear parks boosters tell it, the change to these "system development charges" (SDCs) would finally mean a reasonable, adequate influx of cash to help build out city parks for increased use.

The developers paying the fees use different terms—like "slush fund" and "money-grab."

Now, a coalition of development, realty, and business groups have sued the city for a second time over the SDC changes, and it's a case worth paying attention to. If the developers can get a judge to agree with their lengthy arguments, they say the city might have to pay back millions in ill-gotten gains from its own general fund, squeezing out money for other purposes.
...continues at the Portland Mercury.
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  #247  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2016, 2:39 PM
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Once dangerous Portland park becomes newest food cart pod

PORTLAND, Ore. -- A park that was once a dangerous eyesore in downtown Portland has turned into the city's newest food cart destination, called Grubbin'.

Back in April, the parks department issued a challenge: Come up with a great idea to activate Ankeny Square and bring back positivity. The person with the best idea could rent the square for $1 a year, for up to two years.

Portland State business student Jamal Gardner was the winner.

"To activate it, to do things, to have a community. So I get to be the guy who gets to bring a new view to a very old idea!" Gardner said as he showed off the new space.
...continues at KGW.
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  #248  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2016, 8:12 AM
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Looks like Parks is moving forward with design of the South Waterfront Greenway - North Reach.
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  #249  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2016, 8:22 AM
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Portland's newest park gets $2M closer to becoming a reality (Photos)



A 25-acre swath of land near the intersection of I-205 and I-84 is closer to becoming a full-on park with more hiking and biking trails, a natural play area and some restored habitat thanks to $2 million from the city of Portland.

According to a release, the city is dedicating $2 million in systems development charges to complete the first phase of the park, which is called Gateway Green. The park is taking shape on 25 acres of land that has been unused for years.

The city bought the property for a steal — $19,300 — in 2014.

"I'm pleased to be part of this unique partnership between two local governments and one dedicated non-profit, the Friends of Gateway Green," said Portland Parks Commissioner Amanda Fritz, in the release. "Gateway Green will be a regional destination in park-deficient east Portland, and a working example of how active recreation can be balanced with natural restoration and preservation."
...continues at the Portland Business Journal.
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  #250  
Old Posted Jan 1, 2017, 12:02 AM
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Early Assistance has been requested by Portland Parks and Recreation for the Forest Park Entrance and Nature Center at 4315 NW St Helens Rd:

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Proposal at Forest Park Entrance and Nature Center. Planned improvements: 1) nature center with restrooms, 2)access drive and parking with ada spaces and bus parking; 3) trailhead and accessible pathways connect to forest park;4) street frontage improvements
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  #251  
Old Posted Jan 1, 2017, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by maccoinnich View Post
Early Assistance has been requested by Portland Parks and Recreation for the Forest Park Entrance and Nature Center at 4315 NW St Helens Rd:
This was very much needed. Parking at the end of Thurman was not a viable option at popular times any more.
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  #252  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 2:16 AM
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Concepts come into focus for ‘North Reach’ of South Waterfront Greenway path



The City of Portland is in the latter stages of a master plan update process that will decide the fate of the northernmost section of the South Waterfront Greenway path. Last week Portland Parks & Recreation released three of the design concepts in a presentation given by project consultants and now they want to hear your feedback.

You might recall that a major portion of the new path was completed in March 2015. The “North Reach” of the greenway consists of about four-tenths of a mile between the end of that existing path (at around SW Gibbs Street and the Zidell barge-building warehouse) to the Marquam Bridge.

With all the development in this district and the big plans for the waterfront recently unveiled by Zidell Yards, this is an exciting opportunity to create world-class public space that will double as an important cycling route along the Willamette River. (For more on how Zidell’s plans will impact path construction see our story from September.)
...continues at BikePortland.
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  #253  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2017, 2:04 AM
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Leach Botanical Garden earns funding for development plans

New avenues of revenue have appeared in support of the Leach Botanical Garden, east of the Lents neighborhood.

At the end of December, the Metro Council awarded a $188,000 Nature in Neighborhoods grant to the iconic greenspace for the development of its new pollinator garden. The grant include a 2:1 match of $376,000 from Portland Parks Commissioner Amanda Fritz and Portland Parks & Recreation Director Mike Abbate from system development charges.

...continues at the Business Tribune.
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  #254  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2017, 12:23 AM
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$10M renovation project gets underway at Pioneer Courthouse Square



The lunchtime crowd looking for a Honkin' Huge Burrito on Monday in Pioneer Courthouse Square found the longtime cart not in its original spot on the south side of the square, but in a new location all the way on the other side.

The new home for one of Portland's oldest food carts — and also Philly's on the Phly — is a temporary move as crews undertake a $10 million renovation of the bustling plaza that's long been known as Portland's Living Room.

According to Portland Parks & Recreation, construction officially kicked off on Monday and should wrap up by the end of July. The work, funded by the $68 million Parks Replacement Bond passed by voters in 2014, will address a failing waterproof membrane under the bricks of the upper brick tier along Southwest Broadway and Southwest Yamhill. The membrane was initially rated to last 20 years, but it has been more than 30 years and is "now near a state of failure," according to the city.
...continues at the Portland Business Journal.
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  #255  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2017, 8:44 PM
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Landfill to park: bringing greenspace to NE



A site that used to be a quarry-turned-landfill is scheduled to begin construction in March — this time to become a park.

In pre-construction phase right now, development plans for Cully Park will soon rejuvenate the Northeast neighborhood.

2011, Verde, on behalf of a wide range of community partners, approached City of Portland P&R to partner with us in a new model to develop Cully Park. In June 2012, Portland city Council approved public-private partnership agreement between Verde and PP&R for development of Cully Park.

The resulting City-Verde Agreement authorizes Verde to fundraise for, design and construct a phased plan for Park improvements, known as Cully Park Phase 1.

So far, they've fundraised $5,978,937.

Including recent grants from the Blazers, Portland Parks & Recreation and the Port of Portland Airport Futures Program, more than 25 funders have contributed more than $4 million to the park.
...continues at the Business Tribune.
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  #256  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2017, 8:45 PM
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Time to weigh in on designs for new entrance and nature center for Forest Park



The City of Portland is putting the finishing touches on designs for a major new nature center and “iconic” entrance to Forest Park. Now is the time to share your comments so that the resulting project is as welcoming as possible to people who arrive by bicycle.

We first reported on this project in July 2015. Since then the Parks & Recreation Bureau has hired a contractor to design the project, hosted public meetings, and most recently, has released a set of detailed drawings that show what the new entrance facility might look like.

The $2.3 million plan (that’s what they’ve raised so far, thanks to a mix of system development charges and a $1.5 million state grant awarded in the 2015 legislative session) is to take a vacant industrial lot at the intersection of Highway 30/St. Helens Road/NW Kittridge Ave, and turn it into an interpretive and educational center. You might be surprised to know that despite Forest Park’s popularity and proximity to the city, it lacks a major entrance. Parks wants to remedy that by creating a trailhead that will include a parking lot (with 30 to 68 spaces depending on which design goes forward), a large building for exhibits and classrooms, a courtyard/plaza area, bathrooms, and new trails and improved connections to existing ones.
...continues at BikePortland.
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  #257  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2017, 7:03 PM
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I'm so excited to check this out.

Quote:
$33.5 million Portland Japanese Garden expansion completed on time, despite daunting challenges (photos)



The Portland Japanese Garden's largest improvement in a half century, an expansion to accommodate an increasing number of visitors, has been completed on time, despite bad weather, neighbor complaints and the $33.5 million cost.

On Sunday, April 2, the public will be able to see the results of years of fundraising and 20 months of construction to execute a concept by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma, best known for designing the $1.5 billion National Stadium for the 2020 Olympic Games.

The ambitious project in Portland's Washington Park has transformed land leading up to the hilltop entrance of the Japanese garden, considered one of the most authentic outside of Japan, but not the garden itself.

The expansion tacked 3.4 acres to the front of the 9.1-acre garden. The larger footprint allows for new educational facilities and event spaces for people interested in Japanese gardening and culture.

The visitor experience now starts at Southwest Kingston Avenue across from the International Rose Test Garden. An old driveway next to a parking lot has been replaced with a cedar-clad Welcome Center landscaped by a water terrace and cascading ponds.
...continues at the Oregonian.
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  #258  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2017, 8:03 PM
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Better photos

Quote:
Portland's Japanese Garden unveils its $33.5M makeover (Photos)



The expansion includes a new Garden House that will host horticulture workshops, the Umami Cafe, the authentic medieval Castle Wall (built through a process led by 15th-generation Japanese master stonemason Suminori Awata) and three new gardens.

“Given its proximity to nature, Portland is unlike any place in the world," Kuma said in a release. "This new Cultural Village serves as a connector of the stunning Oregon landscape, Japanese arts and a subtle gradation to architecture."

The Portland Japanese Garden opened in 1961.

Click through for a few glimpses of the expansion.
...continues at the Portland Business Journal.
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  #259  
Old Posted May 5, 2017, 5:30 PM
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A footbridge across West Burnside nearly a reality
Keely Chalmers, KGW 9:19 PM. PDT May 04, 2017

http://www.kgw.com/news/local/a-foot...lity/436936836
Quote:
PORTLAND, Ore. — The city of Portland is about to get a brand-new bridge across West Burnside

The Portland Parks foundation is spearheading an effort to build a $2.5-million pedestrian bridge across West Burnside where the Wildwood trail intersects it.

According to the city, more than 80,000 runners and hikers cross that section of Burnside every year. (continues)
renderings available here: http://www.edcarpenter.net/portfolio...-trail-bridge/
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  #260  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2017, 12:28 AM
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Central City Potential Swimming Beach Sites Study and Eastbank Crescent Riverfront Plan. Both up for adoption by resolution at City Council next week. No funding attached as yet.
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