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  #61  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2016, 11:13 PM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
But, but, but, but I thought Downtown LA was clearly the center of region?

This is not necessarily to you but in particular to one poster in a previous thread who chided me for saying Downtown LA is not the clearly defined center of the area as I told him no such thing existed. He said I was a complete outsider that knew nothing about LA.
LOL. I remember the conversations you had on the LA threads. Just to clarify, since their is an obvious twisting of words going on, but I'm sure you'll figure out a way to bring it up again in the future.

Downtown LA is in fact the center of LA. For all intents and purposes.

Meaning.

.Geographically- downtown is the center of the region/county

.Transit wise - ALL of LAs mass transit lines (minus the green) head to downtown

.Freeways- just google maps. painfully obvious that downtown is the center of the freeway system

.Tallest skyscrapers- self explanatory

.Center of attention in regards to Hollywood movies

.Densest concentration of jobs in the regions.

Now. That being said. Marginally. Every other nodal center.... Century City, Long Beach, Glendale, Burbank, Santa Monica, Pasadena, Hollywood, LAX and etc. Don't compare to Downtown in economic drive. BUT they do spread everyone out away from downtown.

That being said. Its not necessarily saying that Downtown is the center of ALL attention since there are about 3 nodal centers on the west side alone. But anybody with half a brain cell, that have actually visited LA, can recognize that Downtown is the center of LA.
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  #62  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2016, 12:32 AM
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Thank goodness that nobody has used the terms "polycentric" and "multi-nodal" to describe LA's urban typology, or worse, likened it to Tokyo. It makes me want to throw something...
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  #63  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2016, 3:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caligrad View Post
LOL. I remember the conversations you had on the LA threads. Just to clarify, since their is an obvious twisting of words going on, but I'm sure you'll figure out a way to bring it up again in the future.

Downtown LA is in fact the center of LA. For all intents and purposes.

Meaning.

.Geographically- downtown is the center of the region/county

.Transit wise - ALL of LAs mass transit lines (minus the green) head to downtown

.Freeways- just google maps. painfully obvious that downtown is the center of the freeway system

.Tallest skyscrapers- self explanatory

.Center of attention in regards to Hollywood movies

.Densest concentration of jobs in the regions.

Now. That being said. Marginally. Every other nodal center.... Century City, Long Beach, Glendale, Burbank, Santa Monica, Pasadena, Hollywood, LAX and etc. Don't compare to Downtown in economic drive. BUT they do spread everyone out away from downtown.

That being said. Its not necessarily saying that Downtown is the center of ALL attention since there are about 3 nodal centers on the west side alone. But anybody with half a brain cell, that have actually visited LA, can recognize that Downtown is the center of LA.
And FTR it wasn't you, it was another poster who I had in mind.
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  #64  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2016, 5:11 AM
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As I suspect is the case with any city, the definition of the "City" depends on where the person you asked grew up. As you will see in the following map, I've included a number of areas that I think may be plausible. However, I myself grew up in Richmond, an inner suburb but one that is disconnected from the official city proper, so for the majority of these I had to guess what I think people in those areas would think of as the City so they are not representative of everyone.

The City in Vancouver by Glass_City, on Flickr

Green: This is what I imagine would be considered the City by people who live in Vancouver proper. A lot of Vancouver proper is full of quiet, tree-lined streets that aren't completely urban. Though there are chunks of this section that do have single family homes, they are close enough to major destination streets to be considered part of them. All in all, this is about as urban as Vancouver gets; dense, street-facing stores, tight street grid and busy.


Downtown
http://www.stockaerialphotos.com/med...town-vancouver


The scale of development currently typical outside the downtown
http://www.copasetic.ca/investing-va...ic-village.htm

Blue: This is what people living in directly adjacent suburbs would likely consider the City, that being, the municipal boundaries of the city proper. Though not as dense everywhere, the entire area has great transit service, a fairly complete street grid and a number of urban corridors.


Typical shopping street outside of the absolute core
http://www.vancouvermarket.ca/tag/2159-west-41st-ave/

Yellow: This is my personal opinion of what the City is, and one that I think would probably be agreed to by those living anywhere to the south and east of it. New Westminster might as well be Vancouver to me; it feel like a slice of East Van just swam away and settled further up the river. It has a street grid, a legit downtown with nightlife, grit and retail and a strong pedestrian culture. Burnaby is definitely more suburban, but it too has large pockets of highrises, quite a bit of grit and some level of a street grid. Transit service here is worse than in the city proper, but still quite good.

[IMG]downtown New Westminster by waferboard, on Flickr[/IMG]
Downtown New Westminster


Burnaby's Metrotown skyline
http://s3.amazonaws.com/medias.photo...890_medium.jpg


Typical Burnaby walk-ups
http://www.vancouvermarket.ca/tag/metrotown/page/2/

Red: These are the official boundaries of Metro Vancouver. It's cut off to the south by the US border, and the cities to the east of Abbotsford and Chilliwack are turning quite quickly from separate, smaller centres into Vancouver exurbia. There are some serious pockets of urbanity within this red zone (central Richmond, North Vancouver, and Surrey for instance), but the water separating them makes it harder for me to cognitively think of them as being part of the city.


Richmond City Centre
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...=213352&page=3


Surrey City Centre
http://online.gobcrealestate.com/blo...tish-columbia/
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  #65  
Old Posted Jul 10, 2016, 7:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
Thank goodness that nobody has used the terms "polycentric" and "multi-nodal" to describe LA's urban typology, or worse, likened it to Tokyo. It makes me want to throw something...
LOL why is that

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
And FTR it wasn't you, it was another poster who I had in mind.
I know. Just clarifying.
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  #66  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2016, 1:45 PM
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coincidentally, i am in the process of buying a house exactly one block beyond the pre-war urban core of metro st. louis. i chose it because it's a solid mid-century modern house, but it's the exact next block beyond a 1930s neighborhood of classic apartment buildings and a traditional little neighborhood urban strip. the boundary of the "city" though is right there (it's in a generally pre-war suburb called university city, mo), the old streetcar line ran about 4-5 short blocks north, and they only developed 3-4 short blocks to the north of it before world war two. this is about the 7800 block, where the urban core ends. that's about 9 miles west from the riverfront where the city begins. that sounds quite far, but the urban core is a little more expansive than many regions of the same size (the population was higher than boston in 1940).
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  #67  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2016, 3:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilliesPhan View Post
In Philadelphia's case, the only thing I would do is change the city's southwestern border with Delaware County. The first step would be to annex all of Essington and Tinicum, placing Philadelphia International Airport completely within the City of Philadelphia. After that, I would replace Cobbs Creek with the Darby Creek as the southwestern border. This would bring Upper Darby, Darby, Lansdowne, East Lansdowne, and Yeadon into the City of Philadelphia. One could also push for Clifton Heights, Aldan, Colwyn, and Collingdale to be included due to their urban character and public transit access.
Much of eastern Delaware County is as densely developed as Philadelphia is and it's the only bordering county where the density doesn't drop off precipitously once you're a few blocks beyond the border with the city. That's the case for most of City Avenue east of West Chester Pike and for Cheltenham Avenue except for the stretch between 611 and 309. The MacDade corridor and Upper Darby and Bensalem and parts of Bucks County along the Delaware....OK.
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  #68  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2016, 3:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilliesPhan View Post
In Philadelphia's case, the only thing I would do is change the city's southwestern border with Delaware County. The first step would be to annex all of Essington and Tinicum, placing Philadelphia International Airport completely within the City of Philadelphia. After that, I would replace Cobbs Creek with the Darby Creek as the southwestern border. This would bring Upper Darby, Darby, Lansdowne, East Lansdowne, and Yeadon into the City of Philadelphia. One could also push for Clifton Heights, Aldan, Colwyn, and Collingdale to be included due to their urban character and public transit access.
Yes, this is what I was thinking, too. I'd also want to extend the northern boundary to include Melrose Park and Jenkintown. If we're taking a broader view, I'd like to see everything east of 476; south of 276 until Rt 1; south of Rt 1 and also east of 95 above 276. That's all suburban, but still dense, different than suburban areas like Newtown (Bucks), North Wales, Chesterbrook, etc.
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  #69  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2016, 5:50 AM
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I'm a little late to the game, but didn't see this posted before.

A few years ago, a USC grad student published a master's thesis that did a very thorough job of defining LA's "city center," or as he called it, the Santa Monica/Wilshire Corridor.



http://www.citylab.com/design/2012/1...-angeles/4113/
https://dornsife.usc.edu/assets/site...dor_Poster.pdf
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  #70  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2016, 4:40 PM
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very nice!
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  #71  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2016, 6:50 PM
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Yeah I remember seeing that and thinking it interesting.
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  #72  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2016, 7:15 PM
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I'm late to the discussion here, and admittedly have not read every single post, so sorry if this has already been covered.

Cirrus - I just had a few comments about the Denver map. The "strict" map makes sense to me, but the liberal one has some inconsistencies. The map seems to include some pretty suburban areas to the east/southeast, while not including similar (or even more urban) areas on the west side of town.

It seems to me that if the areas south and east of Glendale are included, then so too should be other pre-war suburbs like Edgewater or the Colfax corridor in Lakewood. Also, if the industrial area near Commerce City is included along with Elyria-Swansea, then so too should be southwestern Adams County, and the part of Denver north of I-70 (the industrial areas flanking I-25 are virtually indistinguishable from the ones north and east Elyria-Swansea). Also, if Commerce City is included, then so should the other pre-war suburban enclaves like South Westminster and Old Town Arvada (the latter is admittedly getting pretty far away from the "city" geographically). Otherwise, the safest bet would probably be to use the City and County of Denver line, minus only a few small parts of it like Green Valley Ranch and Bow Mar.
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  #73  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2016, 9:33 PM
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@blackcat I took care to visit this shit twice, and still couldn't understand a damn thing of it.

Guessing (hoping) this will help.
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  #74  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2016, 12:20 AM
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So according to Blackcats post, roughly, I was right ? LOL
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  #75  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2016, 1:03 AM
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Echo Park/Silver Lake would have to be included. Those are pretty vibrant areas,full of amenities.

USC/ and Baldwin Hills/Leimert Park will be future nodes as well.

Culver City is going to become more of node as the TODs keep popping up.
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  #76  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2016, 7:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Echo Park/Silver Lake would have to be included. Those are pretty vibrant areas,full of amenities.
I don't know why those areas were left out either, and Los Feliz was included. Silver Lake and Echo Park feel more "central" to me than does Los Feliz; they're both even closer to downtown LA.
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  #77  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2016, 2:09 AM
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I think it's a old map there.
More of Playa Vista would need to be included, as very important for Silicon Beach.

I recenty went by Crenshsaw, there's more potential there than I thought there was. When they light rail opens, it's going to get better.

LA"s future looks very bright with all these places booming at once.
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  #78  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 2:00 AM
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Jacksonville would basically be the pre-consolidated city and everything outside of it would be suburbs. Old map but the borders remain the same:

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  #79  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 7:06 PM
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For Austin it is a mile or two from downtown in any direction.
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  #80  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 11:27 PM
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every town around here was a streetcar suburb so I'm not too sure about places like the east bay where it's pretty urban in parts, then also super suburban..but dense. Most of the towns are gone in the Delta part of the line

http://www.r2parks.net/SN.html
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