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  #21  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2008, 12:30 AM
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I added a few things to the first post, some links, info and a description of the city for anybody who is unfamiliar with it. Feel free to comment if you see any errors or anything you disagree with, as I can change it or remove it for that matter.

Last edited by Architype; Mar 19, 2010 at 8:04 AM.
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  #22  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2008, 11:41 PM
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Goodbye Andy

Quote:
Andy Wells is not even out of the mayor's chair at St. John's city hall, but there's already a line formed of would-be replacements.

Wells is pondering his political future, after Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Danny Williams said Wednesday that Wells could not start serving as chair of the Public Utilities Board until he had first resigned as mayor.

Williams, responding to a public uproar over Wells's decision to collect two full-time salaries until at least the end of September, said he expected Wells to make a decision "sooner rather than later."

Deputy Mayor Dennis O'Keefe has already declared his intentions to run as mayor, as soon as a race officially begins.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundlan...ontenders.html
I think Wells was considered to be pro-development, and was often disparaging about the "heritage crowd"; what will happen after he is out?

Last edited by Architype; Apr 28, 2008 at 5:03 AM.
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  #23  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2008, 2:04 AM
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Hmmm...good question. I'm hopeful St. John's can come up with some zoning concepts to create a business section and higher density residential.

Tonight's sunset over Pleasantville.

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  #24  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2008, 5:36 AM
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Since you mentioned it, here's a couple articles to bring this thread up to date on the Pleasantville redevelopment:

Quote:
St. John's is destined to get another major housing development - this time courtesy of a federal Crown corporation.

But not until 2013 when the military vacates 32 hectares of land at Pleasantville in the city's east end.

That plan will likely include a mixture of single-family homes, townhouses, apartment units and retail businesses.

"We're looking at density," said McIvor. "Canada Lands believes in creating a place where people can work and play and live all in the same site. We're very interested in that."
http://www.thetelegram.com/index.cfm?sid=102036&sc=82

Actually, it has been noted elsewhere that the land sale may begin this year, and not 2013 as stated in the article.

An older government news release concerning the Pleasantville lands future development:
Quote:
CLC Begins Planning Process for Pleasantville Lands

St. John’s, Newfoundland, March 9, 2007 – Canada Lands Company (CLC) today announced
that, in close collaboration with the City of St. John’s, it is about to begin a master planning process
for its Pleasantville property in the east end of the city. The 80-acre (32-hectare) site is located in
close proximity to the downtown core and features views of the Bally Haly Golf Course to the north
and Quidi Vidi Lake to the south.
CLC has been meeting over the past several months with City of St. John’s officials to review the
planning process for the site. As part of these preparations, CLC has hired Tract Consulting of St.
John’s to assist with creating a vision and master development plan for the site.
“In keeping with CLC’s business philosophy, the planning process will include extensive public
consultations, giving the community the opportunity to contribute to the development of the vision
for this site”, said Ron Pachal, CLC General Manager, Real Estate, Atlantic. City of St. John’s
officials will continue to assist CLC with development plan preparations and will facilitate the
redevelopment process. “The City of St. John’s looks forward to continuing its good working
relationship with CLC in order to create a positive and lasting landmark development for city
residents”, added Mayor Andy Wells.
Information on the master plan development process and related public events will be announced
shortly.
I agree with the redevelopment, but I don't think any single family homes need to be built there, there are enough already. To put single family housing there is to negate everything planners have learned over the last 40 years.

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  #25  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2008, 1:43 PM
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Interesting. Does this mean the military might be enticed to vacate early or just that land sale will go through prior to 2013?

2013 still gives a reasonable length of time to revise plans. If the housing market does anything like the rest of Canada in the next two and a half years they might have reason to revise the plans for the single detached. Town homes and some mid-rises in the 6-10 range would fit well and not impact the historic feel of harbour since it would all be hidden by the hill on King's Bridge. The proximity to downtown makes this a great opportunity to increase core density while maintaining St. John's historic look. Detached single-family homes would be a sad missed opportunity in my mind.
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  #26  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2008, 7:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeInMyShoes View Post
Interesting. Does this mean the military might be enticed to vacate early or just that land sale will go through prior to 2013?
I don't know, but someone wrote in a comment to the Telegram article about the land sale taking place as early as this year. I'm not sure how reliable the source is, and the comments are gone now.

I agree that the density should be higher than detached suburban housing, but most likely, the developers will respond to demand for different types of housing. I think the density should dictate both townhousing, maybe some semi-detached, as well as small towers of 7 to 10 stories. That area should become a smart/green development which sets an example of a livable neighborhood, meaning you have most of your basic needs met within walking or short distances. Being situated next to the most popular lake is what makes it a great location. If the base was never built there it would have become just another part of the city from the fifties.

People often associate density with things like traffic and freeways, when in reality traffic and freeways are the result of suburban sprawl.

Here's a quote from another thread: "densities between 15-20 dwelling units per acre are enough to support walkable communities with local commerce, economically viable transit and a variety of house types that accommodate a diversity of households."

Typical suburban densities are around 6 or 7 dwellings per acre, while developments farther out are about 1 or 2 per acre. Townhouse developments may be only around 10 units per acre, or up to 40. True high density would be considered more than 50 units per acre.

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  #27  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2008, 1:15 AM
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Does anyone know if St. John's fire codes restrict the height/number of dwellings of new timber structures? I've seen a few buildings (a new condo in Pleasantville) that are only a few stories, but are concrete instead of timber-frame.
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  #28  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2008, 2:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeInMyShoes View Post
Does anyone know if St. John's fire codes restrict the height/number of dwellings of new timber structures? I've seen a few buildings (a new condo in Pleasantville) that are only a few stories, but are concrete instead of timber-frame.
I think it would be the same as everywhere else, which is about 4 stories. I'm not sure which ones you are talking about, but if they are old they were built as part of the American base.

Edit: Oh, I think the one you mean is actually a reno of an older building.
It is probably this one: http://www.fivenine.ca/

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  #29  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2008, 2:04 AM
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Here is a list of random St. John's trivia in no particular order that I have somehow accumulated. Hopefully you may find some of this interesting or suprising. Look for a few embedded links in the text:

* The shape and development of the city has been largely determined by the prohibition of residential development above the 190 m contour elevation because of water pressure. Development in some new areas, such as Southlands, is now permitted above that elevation, as resevoirs have been built around the 250 m level.

* One of the highest recognizable points in the city is Kenmount Hill in the West end, at about 260 meters. Kenmount Hill is the location of the city's tallest structure, a CBC transmission tower, which is 114 meters (375 ft) in height, and has a total elevation of about 373 meters (1225 ft) above sea level.

* The city's most beautiful landmark, the Basilica of St. John the Baptist, was the largest cathedral in North America when built (construction 1839-1855), surpassing Notre Dame in Montreal. (Although Notre Dame appears larger from the front, and has higher towers and facade, the St John's Basilica was actually larger in area because of it's cruciform shape. Notre Dame was rectangular in shape.)

* One of St. John's largest apartment buildings only stood for a few years before it was torn down. It was located on the hill at the end of Beothuk St. near Old Pennywell Rd on the edge of the city. It was 8 or 9 stories high and was built in the late 70's or early 80's. You can still see it in some pictures taken from Signal Hill in the 1980's.

* Atlantic Place was originally supposed to be close to 20 stories high, and was to include a hotel on top. The plan was cancelled, and CN built the new Hotel Newfoundland instead. The building structure was still designed to take the extra storeys. The original renderings looked much better than the building did.

* A development was proposed by Trizec to build a complex of high-rise towers combining hotel and office space just west of city hall around 1974. The model of this project, which vaguely resembled Scotia Square in Halifax, was on display at city hall for years. One source says the proposal included a 34 storey tower.

* TD Place was supposed to be 12 stories high, but was forced to scale down to 10.

* The first proposals for The Rooms were designed to go on the city's eastern waterfront, and it looked very similar to the present design (PHB group).
http://www.phbgroup.com/content/port.../cabot3_lg.jpg
http://www.phbgroup.com/content/port.../cabot1_lg.jpg

* The original railroad station was in the East end near the site of the Fairmont Hotel. The old rail line became what is now Empire Avenue, and the new station was built in the west end in 1900.

* The Hotel Newfoundland, the city's most elaborate historic hotel, built in 1925 and 8 floors, was torn down in 1982 by CN. The site is now the parking lot of the new hotel.

* Pleasantville streets were designed in the shape of a cowboy hat by the Americans when they constructed the base at Fort Pepperell in 1941.

* There was a serious proposal in the 1970's to hollow out a section of the Southside Hills to create a 6,000 seat arena.

* The southside of the harbour was once a thriving residential neighbourhood, and was demolished in order to create industrial land for the port.

* The first modern suburb, the area around Churchill Square, Churchill Park was built in the 1940's before Nfld joined Canada, and was originally planned to be about three times as large. It was planned to the most modern design standards at the time, and made extensive use of green spaces. Residents then dubbed it "the New Jerusalem"

* Georgestown, built in the 1800's is considered the oldest suburb. The name however, is not in honour of an English monarch, but rather is short for "George Winter's Town", referencing the prominent Winter family.

* The area now known as Rabbitown grew up outside the city boundaries, and was considerd a slum at the time. Mundy Pond, Shea Heights, and Mount Pearl started in much the same way.

* Much of St. John's was destroyed by fire three times, in 1816, 1846, and most recently in 1892. St. John's unique architecture is the result of rapid rebuilding after the 1892 fire. Many of the oldest buildings are usually found outside the downtown on what was then the outskirts.

* Water Street is the oldest street (often called the oldest in North America), and was originally called Lower Path because it was a footpath used by fishermen in the 1500's.

* St. John's had a streetcar system that ran from 1900 to 1948, and went from Water Street West, the length of downtown, through Duckworth Street and Military Road, and continued down Queens Road and reconnected with Water Street.

* Although originally proposed in 1832, the town of St. John's did not enjoy municipal government status until 1888. Until that time the city's affairs were run by the Newfoundland government. More info here

* Even though St. John's is famous for its heritage buildings, there were many structures with towers, turrets and spires that are now gone. The Anglican Cathedral was supposed to have a 150' spire which was never built, while Gower St Church once had a spire that was removed.

As St. John's is an old and interesting place, I'm sure there are a lot more things hiding around somewhere.

Last edited by Architype; Jul 17, 2012 at 5:58 AM.
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  #30  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2008, 5:11 AM
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Loss of paper recycling in N.L. capital condemned as 'backwards step'


"ST. JOHN'S, N.L. - Ocean waves crash against rocky cliffs as the North Atlantic winds breathe life into grassy plains.

It's this idyllic image that has made Newfoundland and Labrador one of the country's natural treasures, a province largely untouched and unspoiled by man.

But for years, Newfoundland has also struggled to deliver programs and services aimed at waste reduction.

Last week, the only free recycling depot operator in St. John's stopped accepting paper, cardboard, boxboard and glossy materials, and scaled back its collection of newsprint.

The decision by Ever Green Recycling means up to 400 tonnes of paper products - the equivalent of anywhere from 3,200 to 9,600 trees, depending on the actual material - will likely be diverted to landfills this year."

Rest of article HERE


On another note - It's official now, Andy Wells, the mayor of St. John's since 1997 will be resigning March 3, and there will be an election soon. That's the end of an era.

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  #31  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2008, 1:10 PM
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Love all the bizzare facts you listed above I never heard about that apartment on Pennywell, would love to see a photo, seems a little crazy that it was built and tore down within a decade, nuts!!! Regarding the street cars, there's a massive pot hole on the west end of Water St. now and underneath it you can see see the old raillines, they just paved right over the top of them, I should go back down with a camera, put me in a big daydream though thinking about how it used to be and how cool it would be to have a railcar through downtown again, would be great for tourism and very functional for getting around downtown

The Masonic Temple has new owners, looking forward to seeing plans for their renovations, I was in there years ago and remember being a little freaked out at how spooky the place was inside.

http://www.spiritofnewfoundland.com/
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  #32  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2008, 1:50 PM
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To prove the Pleasantville street system trivia:



That would do Calgary proud.
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  #33  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2008, 12:47 AM
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I wonder if that street pattern will change if they redevelop the area.

Here is a pic that shows the building which was near New Penneywell Rd - pic from 1987. I don't think I have any close-ups. You can see if at the top with nothing behind it but trees. I heard it was torn down because it was leaky. If anyone in St. John's has any info on it such as date built, date demolished, name address of the building, no. of storeys I would be interested to know. I think it was 8 or 9 stories, and built a bit before or after 1980, and torn down in the 90's.

Sorry about the quality, this is from a scan.

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  #34  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2008, 2:16 AM
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ha! that building looks so akward back there, just random mid rise and than trees. oh well, it doesnt get any worse than Atlantic Place. Having the worlds biggest eyesore dominating our waterfront is not something to be proud of.

Anyway. im new here, just joined up a couple days ago but have been lurking around for quite a while. good to see that there is a place to discuss whats going on around the city....it almost suprises me that there is stuff to report on but all of them look great to me! Im looking forward to seeing that Steele Hotel on Water Street West completed, looks like a beautiful building. I dont think it fits in very well in that area though for some reason. Seems like a lower desirable place to have a fancy hotel but i guess it may be part of some plan to get that area back on its feet and looking good again.
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  #35  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2008, 2:24 AM
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^Welcome to the forum, feel free to add any opinions or updates any time. Yes, that building was not beautiful, but it had a modern design and a good view from up there, and was really visible from many areas. It was replaced with the houses at the end of the street.

Atlantic Place looks quite a bit different now, but the makeover didn't go far enough; it's better than before, more attractive where it meets the street. I haven't been inside recently, and I would guess that's where the most improvements are.

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  #36  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2008, 3:10 AM
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^ Actually, there is always stuff to report on, much of the time it's things getting turned down and not built.
Quote:
Leo's Lane condo project voted down
Owners brought to tears by announcement
TARA MULLOWNEY
The Telegram

Classic Cafe co-owner Fred Reardon literally shed tears of joy as he sat in the gallery during Monday's St. John's city council meeting.

Reardon and business partner David Heffernan attended the meeting to witness first-hand what council voted to do about the proposed Leo's Lane condo complex, which would have blocked the view of the Narrows from large windows and deck of the cafe, located on Duckworth Street.

When council voted to reject the proposal, Reardon and Heffernan were overjoyed.

"It really brought me to tears, I was so emotional and happy," Reardon told The Telegram after the meeting.

"Our customers comment on the view all the time - I see them come in and the first thing they do is look out the window and almost miss their chair as they try to sit down."

Developer Brian Babb and PHB Group architects had originally proposed an eight-storey, 12-unit condo structure, to be built east of the Journey's End hotel and backing onto the existing Cavendish Place Condominiums. In order to approve the proposal, city council would have had to rezone the area from industrial land use district to commercial central mixed zone and make discretionary amendments for the building's height and maximum floor area ration.

A public meeting was held on the proposal in November, and residents of Cavendish Place voiced their concerns the building would ruin their views. The developer changed his proposal in response to the concerns, and submitted a new plan, which reduced the number of condos from 12 units to 10 and lowering the height by five feet. The developers also added 10 on-site parking spaces to the design.

A second public meeting was held on Feb. 7, and Reardon and Heffernan - who hadn't been aware of the previous meeting - attended it, along with about 20 others. Cavendish residents still had concerns about their view, as well as possible structural and foundation damage to their building, and the Classic Cafe owners made it known that their view, an important part of the restaurant's success, would be obliterated.

"We got the report back from the architect, and it turns out that the view from the Classic Cafe would be pretty well destroyed, eliminated by this development, even at the reduced five feet," Coun. Shannie Duff, who chaired the second meeting, said Monday. "It is my feeling that since this is requiring a rezoning and it requires two separate discretionary amendments regarding the height and the (floor area ratio), that it is not fair to create a situation where a benefit given to one developer destroys or seriously negatively impacts the value of another property."

Coun. Frank Galgay, who represents the downtown area, originally agreed with the proposed development, but said he had changed his mind. He presented council with a petition opposing the condos containing more than 300 names, which had been given to him by Reardon and Heffernan.

"I did go down and I sat at the table of the Classic Cafe and I looked out and saw this beautiful view of the Narrows of St. John's," he said. "For the condominiums to go there as they were presented would have a detrimental effect on the business of the two gentlemen who own that specific business. Not only that, it would be lost to the residents of St. John's who frequent that particular restaurant.

"We're not against development - in the past year we've approved eight developments - but this one, in all conscience, I dwelled on it and mulled it over and looked at the pros and cons, and I think we're making the right decision in saving this very beautiful view of St. John's."
http://www.thetelegram.com/index.cfm?sid=109472&sc=82




Image from city website.

Quote:
Land Use Assessment Report – Proposed 8 Storey, 12 Unit Residential Condominium Building

It is a small site with limited alternative potential. It is abutted on one side by Journey’s End, an
8 storey structure and backs into the side of a hill and the foundation structure for Cavendish
Place Condominiums. As opposed to what would be the situation for most other sites in the
downtown, development of an 8 storey structure will have only a small impact on private views,
the image of the downtown as seen from the harbour and other vantage points, and no impact on
public views. Approval in terms of these unique qualities should not be seen as a precedent for
other downtown sites.
The project also makes good urban design sense. It redevelops a difficult derelict property,
utilizes existing municipal infrastructure, and will help strengthen the residential component of
the downtown.

Leo’s Lane Condominium will be visible from many key vantage points in and around the
harbour. Because of its surroundings and the proposed materials and colours, it will not have an
adverse impact on the image and mosaic of the downtown. It will be seen next to an 8 storey
hotel and against a mixed background of hillside and concrete foundations. The proposed muted
colours blend with neighbouring buildings and the surroundings.

There will be no impact on public views. Although the project falls within the view sheds of
several public views that are identified in the Public Views Study, its roof line is well below
buildings on Duckworth Street, and is not in the view plane.

http://www.stjohns.ca/csj/NewsDetails?id=639
My take on this:
Basically, this development was turned down to protect the view of one restaurant. It's a fact of life that every time something gets built some view is affected. Maybe there were legitimate issues with the surrounding structures, but, regarding the view, you could say that if you don't want to lose a view, you can buy the land. St. John's is therefore left with an empty lot where there could be a place for people to live. The top of this building would have been lower than everything surrounding it because it is at the bottom of the hill. Also, there are no heritage buildings left on this particular block, the last one, a warehouse, was torn down a year or so ago. I truly love views and heritage, but every row of Victorian houses, and every old building on Water Street is also blocking the view from somewhere. The population of downtown, and the city in general has been decreasing or barely holding it's own for years, even as the city continues to devour acres and acres of forest or agricultural land in the suburbs. This puts more and more pressure on the city services as everything from transit and roads to snowclearing becomes more expensive to maintain. If you want a thriving sustainable city, there are some small sacrifices to be made.

I'm not in favour of replacing heritage areas with high-rises. But I think the city must have zones where livable walkable communities can be created for the 21st century in order to be suatainable. That generally means higher density and getting away from suburban development as an easy and cheaper method for growth.

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  #37  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2008, 4:47 PM
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List of some St. John's Developments, note that there are lots of subdivisions.
The term "multiplex" is synonymous with "condo building", some condos are actually detached housing or duplexes.
Some of these are completed, others are just starting construction.

New Condominium Developments in St. John's

St. John's East Condos
*Five Nine on Roosevelt is a 3-story complex located in Pleasantville.
*Osprey Condo Living is an 50+ development located immediately adjacent to the Clovelly Golf Course. Currently offering detached bungalows, there are future plans to build a multiplex building.

St. John's West Condos
*Twin Brooks is an 50+ condominium development located off Ruby Line just adjacent to the Southlands subdivision. Buyers have a choice between semi-detached & townhouse bungalows.
*West Gate, Newfoundland's first gated community, will be located on Topsail Road just west of the Village Mall.
*The Meadows, an Adult Only development located at the intersection of Captain Whalen Dr. and Columbus Dr., consists of both bungalows and 2-story townhouses. The townhouses are the new addition for this year.

St. John's Central Condos
*McKee's Grove, a multiplex building off Newtown Rd. features great views of the city, underground parking and an excellent central location.
*The Narrows are luxury condominums located on Water Street East.
*Southcott Estates located just off Forest Road this is a a townhouse and multiplex development.
*Place Bonaventure located on the corner of Bonaventure Ave. and Merrymeeting Rd. this development offers some of the most luxurious condominums to be found in the city.
*King Edward Condominiums located in the heart of the downtown offers luxury finishes, underground parking and a state-of-the-art gym as well as many other desirable features.

St. John's North Condominiums
*Terra Nova Condominium Corporation located on Terra Nova Road this development offers affordable units in an excellent location close to shopping, hospitals and the university.

New Condominium Developments in Mount Pearl
*Parkdale Ridge is a 50+ development that will be located off the east end of Park Ave. Plans include bungalow townhouses and a multiplex building.

St. John's Subdivisions
This is a partial list of the subdivisions currently under construction in St. John's.

Balnafad Subdivision (Killbride)
Southcott Estates (Forest Rd., St. John's)
East Point Landing (Off Logy Bay Road)
Bellvue Trails (near the airport)
Southridge Estates (Goulds)
Kenmount Terrace
McKee's Grove Condominiums
King William Estates (East End)
Roncalli Estates (Airport Heights)
Vista Park (Airport Heights)
River Bend (off Ruby Line)
Twin Brooks - adult lifestyle condominiums (off Ruby Line)
Southlands (off Ruby Line)
South Brook (off Ruby Line)
McNivan Estates (Airport Heights)
Clovelley Trails (Stavanger Drive)
Grovesdale Park (Thorburn Road)

Torbay Subdivisions
Ansteys off Torbay Road (22 Lots)
Barrox Phase I Nathaniel Drive(6 Lots)
Riverwood (3 Lots)
Jillian's Grove (21 Lots)
Pinch Creek Phase I (10 Lots)
Pine Ridge Creek Phase I (37 Lots), Phase II (53 Lots), and Phase III (24 Lots)
Jones Pond Phase I (37 Lots)
Forest Landing Phase I (44 Lots), Phase II (9 Lots), Phase III Lots (18 Lots), and Phase IV (13 Lots)
Manning's @ Camp Carey (11 Lots)
Motion Drive Ext. (5 Lots)
Sallesnik Place (15 Lots)
Paul's Place Phase I (6 Lots)
Skippers Landing Phase I (19 Lots)
Thomas Gardens Phase I (12 Lots)
Off Indian Meal Line Look Limited (12 Lots)
Patrick's Path (9 Lots)
Off North Pond Road Phase I (24 Lots)

Paradise Subdivisions
Below is a partial list of the Paradise subdivisions and condominium complexes that are currently building homes in the area.
Vista Crest Subdivision
Pleasantview Park
Silverwood Subdivision
Neil's Pond Condominiums
Elizabeth Park Subdivision
Paradise Ridge Subdivision
Meadow Heights Subdivision
Blueberry Creek Subdivision
Sunset Gardens Subdivision
Lakeside Subdivision
Paradise Gardens Subdivision

This list from: http://www.larryhann.com/

Last edited by Architype; Apr 28, 2008 at 5:12 AM.
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  #38  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2008, 9:58 PM
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Meese! Meese! is offline
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Location: St. John's, Newfoundland
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As much as I understand the owners point of view I have to agree with your rant. I dont think its fair that the city has to stop modernizing and developing just for one little establishment. Downtown St.John's is a very vibrant and colourful place and residential is in high demand down there so I think that the city should take advantage and spread its wings. Its alright for certain areas to be historical and have restrictions etc but i dont think they should be so strict. Not everybody has the perfect view and thats the facts of life. A nice mid/high rise would be a nice change for the city instead of more sprawl in the suburbs. The city needs to catch up with the times.

Last edited by Meese!; Feb 21, 2008 at 1:12 AM.
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  #39  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2008, 4:27 AM
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In spite of the fact that it seems a reasonable proposal for that site, council had the legal right to deny the project because it required a rezoning and two separate discretionary amendments regarding the height and the FSR, but I think their reasoning wouldn't hold up in most cities. However if the zoning already permitted that use and height (maybe it should), it probably would have gone ahead. The catch for neighbours is that the land is still zoned industrial at present, which could lead to a less desirable use happening there. Residential use would normally be considered an improvement. People don't really want to live beside an industrial neighbour, and that pile of salt could find a new home, maybe on the Southside. On the other hand, industrial land is needed too.

Regarding zoning throughout the city, people generally have the status quo, which makes it difficult for any new "urban" type projects to go ahead in central areas. The heritage area protects housing of varying quality, but some of it is substandard and architecturely not significant, especially in the West end. If St. John's has more development pressure as many think it will, someone has to make some smart decisions......remember, when you get snowed in it's better to not have to go far to get to things.

All for now

Last edited by Architype; Apr 28, 2008 at 5:13 AM.
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  #40  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2008, 4:48 AM
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Government of Canada Invests to Help Immigrants Settle in St. John's

"Government of Canada Invests to Help Immigrants Settle in St. John's -
ST. JOHN'S, NEWFOUNDLAND and LABRADOR--(Marketwire - Feb. 19, 2008) - The Honourable Loyola Hearn, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, on behalf of the Honourable Diane Finley, Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, today announced funding for the Association for New Canadians in St. John's to deliver settlement and integration services to immigrants, as well as funding for Sharing Our Cultures to stage a multicultural event."

http://www.marketwire.com/mw/release.do?id=822693

Newfoundland can use some more immigration, and I know there is a correlation between the number of highrises and the number of immigrants. I meant that as a joke, but there is some truth there. When people immigrate they are attracted to the more modern and prosperous cities, where they will find convenient places to live, as well as jobs. Most immigrants are used to high density areas.

Last edited by Architype; Apr 28, 2008 at 5:13 AM.
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