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  #541  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2017, 11:08 PM
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New windows in the "Ferris Wheel" building are in.
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  #542  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2017, 11:41 PM
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Hm. Always glad to see a rehab, but I think it would've looked nicer with either something a little more art deco, or industrial warehouse windows. Everyone's a critic, right?
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  #543  
Old Posted Feb 10, 2017, 7:30 PM
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^^It looks like the image link isn't working
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  #544  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2017, 12:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docta_Love View Post
^^It looks like the image link isn't working
Hmmm...works fine for me when I'm logged out on both my phone and laptop.
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  #545  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2017, 12:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docta_Love View Post
^^It looks like the image link isn't working
Hmmm...works fine for me when I'm on either my phone or laptop (logged in or out).
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  #546  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2017, 6:13 PM
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Not showing up for me now, either.
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  #547  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2017, 4:05 PM
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2016 US Census Population Data - Genesee County

The US census recently released data for county-wide population changes from 2010 to 2016. Genesee County's population dropped from 425,790 in 2010 to 408,615 in 2016, a loss of 17,175, reflecting part of a larger trend of population decline in mid-Michigan.


Image Source: MLive
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  #548  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2017, 2:07 AM
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Really great news despite the reputation the Flint River has gained from the water crisis it's water would have been safe to drink if it had been treated with corrosion resisting chemicals so while many wouldn't think that recreation along its banks and in it would be possible let alone enjoyable that's not the case. However that's just the river water of today and because Flint is the first major city along its course i have lingering worries about its sediment especially downstream of Flint in the Tri-Cities area where Dow Chemical wreaked havoc on the Saginaw River watershed up till the clean water act era.

But this should have an amazing effect on Downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods such as the U of M Flint campus area.


Quote:
Flint River Restoration Project will remove dams, boost recreation by 2018

Crain's Detroit Business
By TOM HENDERSON
4-9-2017



It's been a cliché of journalism teachers for years: dog bites man isn't news. Man bites dog is.

The end of the Hamilton Dam is the ultimate man bites dog story — a story about the Flint River that is all good news. It isn't the dog-bites-man story long associated with the river of the leaching of lead, of corrosive water, of scandal, of indictments and of state control gone horribly wrong.

It will be the man-bites-dog Flint River story of kayakers and tubers floating downstream as what is actually a relatively clean body of water meanders to the Saginaw Bay, of fishermen and women casting their lines for fish, of students at the nearby University of Michigan-Flint catching some sun on the grassy banks on a spring day as they kill time between classes.

The Flint Riverfront Restoration Project is a $37 million effort to replace a crumbling, long-dangerous dam and surround it with 80 acres of parks, people-friendly access to the water and three miles of hiking and biking trails along a 1.5-mile stretch of river. The latest funding approval for the project occurred on March 10, when the Department of Natural Resources' Grant Management Program approved a $3 million grant.

The project has had broad support from other nonprofit and government funding sources, including $7.6 million from the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund; $5 million from the Flint-based C.S. Mott Foundation; $5 million from the U.S. Department of Transportation; $4.3 million from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources; $3.5 million from the state's Department of Environmental Quality; and $1.4 million from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Consumers Energy is also doing some remediation on land it used to own along the river that is now part of the UM-Flint campus.

The 200-foot-wide Hamilton Dam is in the middle of UM-Flint's campus, on the north edge of downtown. Built in 1920, it once also served as a pedestrian bridge, but pedestrians have been blocked by a locked gate for years because of the bridge's deterioration.

The dam has long been rated as unsatisfactory by state inspectors, the lowest ranking given. It is also classified as a high-hazard dam, meaning there's a chance of fatalities and significant impact on infrastructure downriver, including destruction to buildings downtown and widespread flooding in the city, if the dam were to fail.



....

According to Amy McMillan, director of the Genesee County Parks and Recreation Commission, talk of demolishing the dam had gone on for years but languished for lack of funding.

"One of the most important parts of the story of how the project was essentially revived by the Flint River Corridor Alliance and the Flint River Watershed Coalition in 2015 was when they were awarded the grant from the Hagerman Foundation to initiate the preliminary engineering and design for the project," she said.

Momentum gathered quickly after that $200,000 grant.

The restoration project will also take down a small dam called the Fabri Dam just downriver from the Hamilton that was built in 1979, remove walls along the river bank near the Hamilton and, to make the river more kayakable, lower some falls upriver that were exposed when the river was lowered to reduce pressure on the Hamilton Dam.

The two dams are the last on the way to Saginaw Bay.

McMillan said the project is in the final stages of design and the permitting process to get the dam removed is underway. She said plans are to have the dam removed by November and for the entire project to be done by the end of 2018.

The dams' removal is expected to have a significant beneficial effect on fish populations, according to DNR fisheries managers, particularly on fish that live in lakes but swim upriver to spawn, including walleye but also lake sturgeon and white suckers.

....

http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...-recreation-by

Quote:
New incubator in historic building aims to transform Flint

Crain's Detroit Business
By TOM HENDERSON
4-9-2017



Phil Hagerman helped transform a corner drug store into a $4.4 billion company. To create a headquarters for the company, he transformed one of automotive history's most significant sites. Now, inspired by the change he has seen in downtown Detroit, he wants to transform downtown Flint.

Hagerman and his father, Dale, founded Diplomat Pharmacy (NYSE: DPLO) in 1975. Today, the company supplies rare and expensive drugs and support services to patients with cancer and immunological disorders in every state in the country and employs about 3,000 in 17 facilities in 14 states, including 1,200 at its Genesee County headquarters a few miles south of downtown Flint.

Diplomat, which went public in 2014, has grown both organically and through acquisitions. In 2005, it had revenue of just $30 million, and by 2015 it had grown revenue to $2.2 billion. In 2016, it doubled that at $4.4 billion.

In 2009, Diplomat bought a sprawling, 583,000-square-foot former General Motors Technology Centre at auction and moved 200 employees in the next year, with plans to grow headcount quickly.

The move brought back to life one of the most famous sites in automotive history: At 8 p.m. on Dec. 30, 1936, autoworkers began a sit-down strike there at GM's Fisher Body Plant Number One, which after 44 days led to the recognition of the United Auto Workers.

Hagerman wants to bring the same approach to downtown Flint — to fix up buildings abandoned by failing companies, invest in early-stage companies that want to call Genesee County home and establish a business incubator whose tenants can capitalize on creative partnerships with for-profit companies, nonprofits and area universities.

Ferris Wheel

For the last 30 years, the only tenants of the historic Ferris Building have been pigeons. A seven-story art deco icon built in 1930, the Ferris Building originally housed the Gainey Furniture Co. and got its current name when the Ferris Brothers Fur Co. moved in a few years later. Today, the building is undergoing a $7.5 million renovation and will be home to a business incubator called the Ferris Wheel Innovation Center.

Anyone will be welcome to walk in off the street with an idea for a business and get the idea vetted, in part by a team of part-time students in a wide range of disciplines from the University of Michigan, the University of Michigan-Flint, Oakland University, Kettering University and the College for Creative Studies in Detroit.

If the idea warrants further development, the incubator will help create a business plan, offer marketing, design, prototyping and small-batch runs and low-cost ancillary services such as legal and accounting. As businesses evolve, the center will help raise seed funding and later rounds of equity capital.

The incubator will also host regular business-plan competitions, boot camps and demo days for startups to strut their stuff.

The state of Michigan is on board, too. On March 28, the Michigan Strategic Fund approved grants totaling $2.5 million for Hagerman's projects, including $1.5 million for the Ferris Wheel.

"This is a creative, ambitious swing for the fences that is one of the most interesting ideas for startup companies that we've seen in Michigan. If you think about all the elements that make for a successful startup, it's tough, particularly tough outside a university setting," said Chris Rizik, CEO and fund manager of Ann Arbor-based Renaissance Venture Capital Fund, which is affiliated with Business Leaders for Michigan.

"The thought of bringing all that together in a single place? We haven't seen it done anywhere else. It's exciting. In my opinion, it's doing God's work."


The Hagermans renovated the Dryden Building for $6.8 million. Now it's the offices of SkyPoint Ventures LLC, the Hagermans' venture capital and real estate development firm.

Hagerman credits Dan Gilbert and his efforts in Detroit for inspiring him to invest in Flint's transformation. Gilbert has bought and rehabbed long-empty office buildings, made the Madison Building a home and showcase for early-stage tech companies and co-founded Detroit Venture Partners, a venture capital firm.

"I've been incredibly inspired by what Dan has done. His taking Quicken downtown when everyone else was going in the other direction was inspiring," said Hagerman.

Members of his SkyPoint team have made several trips to downtown Detroit to meet with various members of Gilbert's team.

"When we started buying buildings in Flint, Gilbert had already gotten traction in Detroit. We wanted to bring credibility to downtown Flint. We knew we had to make a splash, that we had to put significant money in to make a difference," said Hagerman, who spent $6.8 million to buy and renovate the historic Dryden Building next door to the Ferris Building. The Dryden Building had been vacant for 20 years; Hagerman's wife, Jocelyn, managed the renovation, which was finished in 2015.

Dryden is home to the Hagerman Foundation; SkyPoint Ventures LLC; and Flint Ferris Building LLC. Located at the corner of Second Street and Saginaw, it was built in 1902 and at one time housed offices for the Durant-Dort Carriage Co., one of the Flint companies that at the turn of the 20th century morphed into the General Motors Corp.

It also was home to one of the earliest J.C. Penney stores in the country.

Hagerman's team didn't just look to Detroit for inspiration. It also flew to, among other places, Chicago, Cincinnati and Pittsburgh to visit incubators and tech centers there. The vision that evolved for Hagerman was to form a for-profit venture-capital arm to buy real estate and invest in early-stage companies, to form a nonprofit foundation and to create a full-service incubator and co-working space.

http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...NEWS/170409865
Here is a link and a blerb about the Crain's special on the current happenings in Flint there are many links on the page itself to other projects currently going on in downtown and across the city and metropolitan area.

Quote:
Special report: The revitalization of Flint

Crain's Detroit Business
By TOM HENDERSON
4-9-2017



The Capitol Theatre in downtown Flint opened in 1928 as a vaudeville house and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. It showed its last movie in 1976 and stopped holding concerts in 1996. But if things go according to plan, it will be back up and running this fall in all its original glory.
It may come as a surprise to those who only know Flint through its water crisis or old Michael Moore documentaries that its downtown is bustling these days. At the heart of much of the development are Diplomat Pharmacy's Phil Hagerman and his wife, Jocelyn, whose foundation and investments are revitalizing the city and Genesee County.

This month's Crain's Michigan Business section focuses on the many ways the Hagermans are transforming the city, from renovating historic buildings to investing in startup companies that want to call Genesee County home:



http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...ation-of-flint
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  #549  
Old Posted May 2, 2017, 6:32 PM
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There's been a bit more good news for Flint recently money allocated to the city by the federal government by Obama to replace the lead service lines and city water-main's has just been unlocked by the state i believe they had to match some of the funding but it was over 100 million if i recall correctly, i couldn't find the article. There has also been a deal reached with Detroit's water authority The Great Lakes Water Authority to keep Flint in the system for 30 years and they will cover the costs of the Flint Regional Water Authority's pumping station and line from Lake Huron and use it as a back up during times of heavy water usage.

Quote:
GM opens restored Durant-Dort Factory One in Flint
Crain's Detroit Business
May 02, 2017
By Stephanie Hernandez McGavin
Automotive News



General Motors Co. opened the Durant-Dort Factory One in Flint on Monday after four years of restorations.

The factory is considered to be GM’s birthplace and the “epicenter” for the worldwide automotive industry, the automaker said in a statement Monday.

It includes space to rent out for events, as well as a GM carriage-building and vehicle-manufacturing archive collection. Factory One is viewable to the public by appointment.

In 1886, William Crapo Durant and Josiah Dallas Dort leased the factory to build carriages — later becoming one of the largest horse-drawn carriage makers. Durant went on to buy Buick Motor Co. and then used his successes to build GM in 1908.

In 2012, Mark Reuss, GM’s executive vice president of global product development, purchasing and supply chain, and Kevin Kirbitz, the Factory One operations manager, became interested in restoring the building.

“Factory One sparked the global auto industry and was a catalyst in the formation of General Motors,” Reuss said in a statement. “It preserves the stories of the early visionaries who built a brand-new industry in this city, within the very walls of where it happened.”

After GM purchased the factory in 2013, it renovated and reinforced structural elements of the building while keeping certain “vintage architectural elements,” such as wooden beams and brickwork.

The automaker repaired and waterproofed the water-damaged foundation of the building. It installed “period-accurate” windows and doors and new roofing; replaced 17,000 bricks and 20 percent of the building’s mortar; and set up new utilities and plumbing.

“Factory One is part of the very fabric of Flint, and its reopening is as much about the future as it is the past,” Kirbitz said in a statement. “It is a tremendous community asset and academic resource that will educate and inspire generations to come.”

GM will also financially aid the Durant-Dort Carriage Company Foundation to help run the historic Durant-Dort office building across the street.
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...y-one-in-flint
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  #550  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 1:56 AM
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That building is a gem - it has some nice masonry detail, and the brick paved street reinforces the historic feel. Glad its survived all these years and has a new use. With all of the negative news out of Flint, it's good to see something positive.
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  #551  
Old Posted May 7, 2017, 12:56 AM
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Uptown plans $17 million residential-business complex, “The Marketplace,” at site of

http://www.eastvillagemagazine.org/2...e-of-old-ywca/

Quote:
Uptown plans $17 million residential-business complex, “The Marketplace,” at site of old YWCA

Posted on May 2, 2017
by Harold C. Ford

A new, $17 million, residential-commercial project is being planned at the site of the old YWCA in downtown Flint according to Kyle McCree, director of Core Initiatives for the Flint and Genesee County Chamber of Commerce.
The project is spearheaded by the Uptown Reinvestment Corporation (URC), a nonprofit organization focused on the redevelopment and revitalization of downtown Flint. PK Housing and Management Company, based in Okemos, is slated to develop and manage what is being called The Marketplace, to be built at the old YW property bordered by Wallenberg, Third, and Fourth Streets. McCree said he is on loan to the URC from the Chamber for the project......
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  #552  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 6:17 PM
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Holy shit, a real development!
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  #553  
Old Posted May 11, 2017, 2:29 AM
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Renderings aren't finalized plans but represent general goals.

Quote:
Downtown Flint River landscape to change as part of $36.8M project













A $36.8 million project is expected to change the landscape of the Flint River in downtown Flint.

Major pillars of the project, designed in 2010 by Wade Trim, include removing the Hamilton Dam, greening Riverbank Park and the former Chevy in the Hole site, building a walking bridge over the Swartz Creek and Flint River to connect the statewide Iron Belle Trail and softening the banks of the river with rocks and native plants.

The project is headed by Genesee County Parks and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Work will begin this summer and wrap up tentatively in 2019, although some aspects of it will be finished and usable before then.

....

Most funding has been secured, thanks to public and private organizations, including the Flint River Watershed Coalition, Flint River Corridor Alliance, city of Flint, local universities like Kettering and local foundations that jumpstarted funding for the project.

...

Work on greening the former Chevy in the Hole, now known as Chevy Commons, will continue this year, and officials expect the Hamilton Dam removal to begin after Consumers Energy finishes its contamination cleanup project immediately upstream.

Although not officially part of the Riverfront Restoration Project, Consumers Energy is working on a project that involves dredging and capping off a section of the riverbed between Fifth Avenue and the Hamilton Dam, where manufactured gas was once produced at a riverfront factory.

After that, removal of the Hamilton Dam and a Fabri Dam downstream will begin along with naturalizing that portion of the river to soften the concrete banks with natural stone and boulder.

Greening sections of the total 60 acres that is Chevy Commons will also take place during that time, with other phases of that project beginning in 2018.

....
http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/inde...landscape.html
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  #554  
Old Posted May 14, 2017, 10:24 PM
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^ Those renderings are a bit wonky, but it will be great if they can eliminate as much of the concrete embankments as the images imply.
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  #555  
Old Posted May 15, 2017, 2:15 AM
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Now this is a big deal. Along with what they've been doing up near the channelized portion of the river at Chevy-in-the-Hole, this is transformative.

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