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  #41141  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 1:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
After watching the video you linked, E_R, I started looking at several other Pacific Ocean Park videos, too.

I found this one that shows the same thing as your link, but it's in color at around the 4:20 mark.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyvLBKK-nWU
Thanks for the heads-up Martin.

I realize everyone is pretty much over my diving bell fixation

...but here's the color view that Martin mentioned.


screen-grab




And may I add....

This snapshot



https://www.pinterest.com/pin/479703797782916783/

This is supposedly 'Playland' in San Francisco but I'm not so sure.

As you can see it was a much smaller diving bell. (and it appears to have been located in the swimming area!?)


OK, I'm done.
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 11, 2017 at 1:55 AM.
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  #41142  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 1:28 AM
John Maddox Roberts John Maddox Roberts is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl Boebert View Post
Basque restaurants operate on the same system. If you are ever in sheepherding country, look for places named the "Star Hotel." Chances are it'll be a Basque operation. And good :-)

Cheers,

Earl
I ate at a restaurant in Paris many years ago called "Ma Normandie" that operated the same way. Everybody sat on benches at long tables and passed the food around. No ordering, you just ate what was on that day's menu. A real workingman's place. So maybe it's a Norman thing, too.
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  #41143  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 1:31 AM
Mstimc Mstimc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
A LAT article gives a little more history (although the Taix family claims Marius came to Los Angeles "around 1870"):

"When Marius Taix, a baker from the Hautes Alpes of France, arrived in 1882, he bought a small lot on Commercial Street for $10,000, opened Taix French Bread Bakery and began catering to the 4,000 French who by then lived in the area.

The building survived until 1913, when it was torn down. Taix built the Champ d'Or Hotel on the site, and leased a restaurant on the first floor to a tenant.

"In 1927--at the height of Prohibition--federal agents and Taix's pharmacist son confronted the restaurant's operator for selling alcohol on the property. The angry restaurateur tossed the young Taix the keys and told him to "do it yourself."

The Taix French Restaurant was born.

In celebrating its opening, the same federal agents toasted the son's new profession with wine that he had purchased for "medicinal purposes."

The restaurant served its last specialite de la maison at that location in 1964, when the city paid $412,000 for the property that eventually became the Metropolitan Detention Center. Ten adjacent buildings also were demolished, two of which dated to the 1880s."



The same article notes:

"It all came together in the 1830s, when immigrant Jean Louis Vignes--forced to leave France because of his philandering and politics--arrived in Los Angeles from Bordeaux. He brought with him the grapevine cuttings that he used to establish a 100-acre vineyard called El Aliso, just south of what is now Union Station."

"Philandering and politics"? I wish I knew more.
Another little known somewhat noirish factoid about the current Taix. A family member of the Episcopal Bishop of L.A., J. Jon Bruno is/was a co-owner, at least as of 10 years or so ago. I had the pleasure of dining with him there a couple times as part of my church's Vestry. He is a big and big-hearted man. The noirish part--he was a cop before he became a priest and killed the man who shot his partner! He's retiring in a couple of months...
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  #41144  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 1:51 AM
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more Italian Americans

"Festa and Emanuelli Families celebrating Armitice Day in Dogtown Los Angeles."


https://www.google.com/culturalinsti...99999994%7D%7D

This photograph just blew me away!







Lunch at Villa Nova for anyone who figures out where in Dogtown the Festa/Emanuelli pic was taken.


www.giphy.com


__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 12, 2017 at 12:14 AM.
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  #41145  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 2:35 PM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
Yes Earl the food was good. TAIX also had the atmosphere of socialism and revolutionaries. I got the feeling that anarchists met there for meetings....
Another reason to suspect a Basque influence. I was schooled in Anarcho-syndicalism at an early age by the camp tender of the sheep camp where we spent our summers. Many Spanish Basques fled their homeland with the rise of Franco and French Basques with the advent of Vichy.

Cheers,

Earl

Edit: If you are ever in the Boise area, you should visit the museum of the Basque diaspora: https://www.basquemuseum.com/ I donated my father's pictures of the California sheep camps to them.

Last edited by Earl Boebert; Apr 11, 2017 at 7:15 PM. Reason: Add link to Basque Museum
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  #41146  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 3:16 PM
Jungmann Jungmann is offline
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Originally Posted by Earl Boebert View Post
Another reason to suspect a Basque influence. I was schooled in Anarcho-syndicalism at an early age by the camp tender of the sheep camp where we spent our summers. Many Spanish Basques fled their homeland with the rise of Franco and French Basques with the advent of Vichy.

Cheers,

Earl
I worked at my grandfather's cabinet shop in Vernon one summer in the early Fifties, and one day he--a Socialist who morphed into a FDR-liberal--took me uptown to lunch at Taix. I remember a dark, noisy room, the long tables, sawdust on the floor, and bowls of pickled eggs for the taking. I thought they'd been dipped in ink, like Easter Eggs--I didn't try one.
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  #41147  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 5:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jungmann View Post
I worked at my grandfather's cabinet shop in Vernon one summer in the early Fifties, and one day he--a Socialist who morphed into a FDR-liberal--took me uptown to lunch at Taix. I remember a dark, noisy room, the long tables, sawdust on the floor, and bowls of pickled eggs for the taking. I thought they'd been dipped in ink, like Easter Eggs--I didn't try one.
Yes Jungmann, I totally concur with your apt description of the interior atmosphere! That's exactly what I also experienced.
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  #41148  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 7:00 PM
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Here's another small Julius Shulman photoset. This one actually has two images, but they're virtually the same apart from the color/saturation. This is "Job 3138: William Alexander, 'Moon Room' House, 1961".



Getty Research Institute

Although there's no address given, I think we're looking over West Hollywood. The skylight on the right suggests that the 'Moon Room' is/was on the roof of another building. Does anyone know its exact location?
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  #41149  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 8:00 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl Boebert View Post
Another reason to suspect a Basque influence. I was schooled in Anarcho-syndicalism at an early age by the camp tender of the sheep camp where we spent our summers. Many Spanish Basques fled their homeland with the rise of Franco and French Basques with the advent of Vichy.

Cheers,
Earl
Where did you spend your summers? The Brokeback Mountain camp tenders had a Basque character who provided them with supplies.

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  #41150  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 8:59 PM
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I'm wondering if the recently-discussed Vine St. is the quondam Vineyard St. (of 1862). The following, from the August 9, 1862, issue of the Los Angeles Star, makes my head spin such that I can't manage to construe it in a focused way vis-à-vis any map of ye olde L.A.; but perhaps others can do better (or will at least enjoy the sensation of their heads being spun). It at least vaguely appears to be in the right area, and concerns one of the real estate parcels of Jean B. Trudell, under threat of being sold by the sheriff for non-payment of taxes (the parcel, not Trudell): "Second, commencing on Vineyard street which divides the property of Jesus Altamirano from the property of Leonardo Cota, thence running north fifty-nine degrees west one hundred and fifty-five feet to the wall of Victor Prudhomme; thence south thirty-eight one-half degrees west one hundred and six feet to the outside of the wall of the house of the Cota family; thence south fifty-six and three-fourths degrees east one hundred and sixty-three feet to Vineyard street; thence north thirty-five degrees east one hundred and twelve and a half feet, to the place of beginning." I can at least help by assuring you that the aforementioned Jesus Altamirano was in point of fact Maria de Jesus Altamirano (the other figures mentioned are well-known folks).
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  #41151  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 9:52 PM
Diamond-X Diamond-X is offline
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Katharine Putnam Hooker was notable among women of her time. She was the niece of Josiah Dwight Whitney of the California Geological survey, there is a famous mountain named for him. Katharine came to California in 1853 via the Panama crossing when her father sent back for her mother and her. They were aboard the SS Tennessee as it approached San Fransisco, struck a rock and sank. Katharine and her mother had shared a stateroom with a Mrs. Chenery. In 1862 Katharine was aboard the Paul Pry when it struck a rock near Alcatraz Island. She was 14 and under the watchful eye of William H. Brewer. Brewer made sure she was placed aboard a lifeboat before finding safety himself. Once aboard the lifeboat Katharine found herself seated next to Mrs. Chenery. At the age of 20 she married John Daggett Hooker and moved to Los Angeles. Around 1886 they built a house at 325 West Adams Street, later renamed to Adams Boulevard, at the northwest corner of Grand Avenue and Adams, later the site of the Orthopedic Hospital. The house was later donated to a family friend, Maude Thomas, who turned it into her St. Catherine's School. I believe it's near the house used for the Munsters exterior shot, if I'm not mistaken.
She was friend to many notable people of the time: John Muir, Elizabeth Stoddard, David Starr Jordan, George Ellery Halel to name a few. She was in San Fransisco in April of 1906 when the earthquake took place. She died in July 1935 at the age of eighty-six.

Far from noir-ish, Katharine was an intellectual and mixed with that type. Her home on West Adams had a large backyard garden and was where John Muir wrote some of his works there.

Here is a photo of Katharine and her dog Lado on the porch of their West Adams Street home.



This information and photo were gathered from the WAHA website located http://www.westadamsheritage.org
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  #41152  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 10:35 PM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
Where did you spend your summers? The Brokeback Mountain camp tenders had a Basque character who provided them with supplies.

The family that owned the sheep lived in Delleker, CA, just outside Portola and the sheep camp was somewhere areound Beckwourth Pass. This would be on the Western edge of the Basque diaspora, which spread more through Northern Nevada, Idaho, and Montana.

Cheers,

Earl
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  #41153  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 12:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

"Festa and Emanuelli Families celebrating Armitice Day in Dogtown Los Angeles."


https://www.google.com/culturalinsti...99999994%7D%7D


Lunch at Villa Nova for anyone who figures out where in Dogtown the Festa/Emanuelli pic was taken.
Well....since no one took me up on my bet.

I checked the 1917/18 city directory.

lapl

lapl

But I'm not sure if Augusta was ever in the Dogtown area. (I believe some of the Dogtown streets are missing....or have been renamed(?)





I've also been looking for the two buildings you see in the background.

detail

note that they both have water towers (the shorter building is behind the steering wheel)


but I haven't been able to locate the building.....yet.


https://www.amoeba.com/blog/2013/03/...s-dogtown.html



this one is much later than 1918 (obviously)


https://www.amoeba.com/blog/2013/03/...s-dogtown.html

Another stumbling block is that I don't know the exact perimeters of 'Dogtown'. If there is a definitive map I haven't been able to find it.

__
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  #41154  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 1:04 AM
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This photograph was supposedly taken in Dogtown as well.



https://www.google.com/culturalinsti...eAFGZDaP4byk6A

I haven't been able to track down a George Frisby.

__

update: Here's a more detailed description.

Run-down residences on Nand Street, to be demolished for the construction of Ann St. Housing Project. One is the office of George Frisby at 1446."
Photo date: June 26, 1952.

http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...olNumber=61567
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  #41155  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 1:20 AM
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Here's one more photograph before I sign off for the night.


"Dogtown railroad workers, Los Angeles"


Italian American Museum of Los Angeles

Here:
https://www.google.com/culturalinsti...cAEp_VuKofY-7A

I wonder if any of these men also appear in the Armistice Day group photo-



__




bottom row, fourth from right.


Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 12, 2017 at 1:39 AM.
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  #41156  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 2:21 AM
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Calling Henry Willson. (& I was just getting ovet the boys on the diving bell.)
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  #41157  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 2:42 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

Another stumbling block is that I don't know the exact perimeters of 'Dogtown'. If there is a definitive map I haven't been able to find it.

__
Have you seen this map? I don't know if it rates the descriptor "definitive". There's an excellent article at the link:

amoeba

I did a post on the Mesnager family who lived and worked in Dogtown. A Dogtown street is named after Louis Mesnager. [Edouard] Naud Street is there too (not "Nand" as LAPL says). They intersect. More info on Naud.


google maps


P.S.

I just realized you saw the Amoeba article e_r. I think their map is good.

Last edited by tovangar2; Apr 12, 2017 at 7:28 PM. Reason: add link
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  #41158  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 5:50 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Then there's the Dogtown area that developed when all the piers started disappearing around Venice / Santa Monica Ocean Park (recently discussed).

A couple online descriptions of where that area was:

7/10th of a mile north of the Venice Beach Pier, is Pacific Ocean Park a/k/a Venice Park....You will notice an outcropping in the sand with a large breakwater in the ocean. This was the site of Lick's Pier, a/k/a Ocean Park pier, a/k/a Pacific Ocean Pier...which incredibly, in it's day was larger (in terms of business in and around the pier) and more active than the Santa Monica Pier. That area and the residential area inland was called by some "Dogtown"....It's actually the old neighborhood of Ocean Park, which was just as big and important in it's day, as Santa Monica and Venice..It has now kind of been absorbed into Santa Monica and Venice...A lot of people don't even know the neighborhood was called Ocean Park....

And...

The Ocean Park Pier in Venice, Calif., was the site of a cultural revolution in the 1970s: A surfing and skateboarding renaissance that was captured in Stacy Peralta's 2001 documentary "Dogtown and Z-Boys," made into a film titled "Lords of Dogtown." At the heart of the scene was a surfboard company called Zephyr. The shop soon became a hub of activity for local kids who lived to skate and surf. But forget the millennial-style money, sponsorships and prestige that surf rats often pursue today: At the time, surfing "wasn't the thing you did to build your self-esteem in society." Not only was surfing a fringe activity, but the pier and its surrounding area was a veritable ghetto of crime, junkies and working-class families. Once a major attraction, by the early 1970s Venice's heyday as a thriving tourist destination had seemingly come to an end. Starting a decade prior, the local piers had begun to shut down and fall into disrepair. Little by little, the swath of beach-side turf between Santa Monica and Venice, known as Dogtown, became a no-man's land of urban detritus, run-down buildings and, at the water's edge, the broken-down Ocean Park Pier. As the documentary explains, "[Dogtown] was the last great seaside slum. ... It was dirty, it was filthy. It was paradise."
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  #41159  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 5:48 PM
oldstuff oldstuff is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
This photograph was supposedly taken in Dogtown as well.



https://www.google.com/culturalinsti...eAFGZDaP4byk6A

I haven't been able to track down a George Frisby.

__

update: Here's a more detailed description.

Run-down residences on Nand Street, to be demolished for the construction of Ann St. Housing Project. One is the office of George Frisby at 1446."
Photo date: June 26, 1952.

http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...olNumber=61567
There is a George Lorenzo Frisby, who was working on his own as a garage mechanic and his wife Evalyn was the bookkeeper in the business. They appear in the 1940 Census, living at 516 San Pascual Avenue with their two sons. George was born in Utah in about 1900. There is no listing for their business that I can find

In 1930 they lived in Alhambra and George worked as a mechanic in a trucking company. They appear in a directory, in 1962, living in La Puente, where he is still listed as a mechanic.

George died in 1974 and records show Evalyn died in 1979

Since we cannot see the other surrounding buildings very well it is possible that either the one behind or to the right side was a garage. The brick structure directly behind the office looks like it might have large doors like a garage. There are also some car bodies out in front.
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  #41160  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 8:47 PM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
Have you seen this map? I don't know if it rates the descriptor "definitive". There's an excellent article at the link:

amoeba

I did a post on the Mesnager family who lived and worked in Dogtown. A Dogtown street is named after Louis Mesnager. [Edouard] Naud Street is there too (not "Nand" as LAPL says). They intersect. More info on Naud.


google maps


P.S.

I just realized you saw the Amoeba article e_r. I think their map is good.
Thanks for your help t2.

Here's another pretty good view of Dogtown. (the top is East)


https://www.amoeba.com/blog/2013/03/...s-dogtown.html


I thought perhaps the large building in the distance of the Armitice Day photo might be the one circled below.(it's the only one that appears to have a watertower on top)


detail

The area outlined in red would be where the pic was taken (I've narrowed it down to 40 or 50 houses. lol)





----



lamla

"By 1910, Italians such as the Aprato and Giacoletto families, pictured here in front of their boarding house,
constituted one-third of the residents of the North Broadway district. The heart of the settlement
could be found on Castelar Street (now North Hill Street), near St. Peter's Italian Church.
It extended to Alpine, Ord, San Fernando (present-day North Spring Street),
College and Casanova streets."
_____


oldstuff, can you work your magic and find some additional information on the Aprato and Giacoletto families?

I'd appreciate it.
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