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  #41281  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 6:04 AM
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Ocean Park Country Club

Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
Here's a picture of the Ocean Park Country Club building with tennis courts, although no date or location is given. A framed version appears in the 1901 section of this Ocean Park article. The start of the entry reads, "[Abbot] Kinney & [Thomas] Dudley build the Club House for the Ocean Park Country Club (Club House-Main-Westminster-Pacific)."


LAPL

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Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
The Ocean Park Country Club Clubhouse was located where Westminster Park is today:



April 1909 Santa Monica Sanborn Map @ ProQuest via LAPL

The Ocean Park Country Club Clubhouse can be seen above the lower right corner (and at an angle to the nearby buildings) in this 1919 aerial:



00009128 @ LAPL
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  #41282  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 4:13 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Tartans in the kitchen?




Home Economics classrooms, a la Alhambra Senior and Junior High Schools. Dates unknown, (Mid '50s?) Evidently So Cal Edison promoting "remodels", complete with the latest Mixmaster, front loading washer and dryer, electric and gas stoves, dishwasher, deepfreeze, Pyrex percolator, Wearever aluminum cookware, Singer sewing stations(presumably electric), linoleum tiled floors, Presto slow cooker, saddle shoes and Crisco shortening.




http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...coll2/id/10581







http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...coll2/id/10579





http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...coll2/id/10584










Alhambra Jr. High
http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...3coll2/id/9872
















http://i357.photobucket.com/albums/o...6.jpg~original





ebay










http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...coll2/id/10580





Not surprisingly, no (high end) Dishmasters in sight. (School Board budget?) But that is not surprising (to me). They were/are decent and dependable fixtures, that should probably last indefinitely, but for the introduction of heavy mineral deposits and/or galvanized pipes that shed metal particulates into the water stream, destroying seals and impeding flow. Only minor complaint was the chrome surround. It provided a nice platform - that needed constant attention to remove unsightly water spots (hard water). The discussion reminds me of Sloan-valve-equipped tankless toilets, of which it is said that parts are still available for the 1906-design. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sloan_Valve_Company




http://retrorenovation.com/wp-conten...dishmaster.jpg





http://retrorenovation.com/wp-conten...-1-500x332.jpg






http://retrorenovation.com/wp-conten...n-faucet-3.jpg







https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com...290e817b11.jpg




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  #41283  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 4:13 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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"The first important residence built in Alhambra called 'The Alhambra'." ~1900 http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...0coll2/id/7310





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  #41284  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 6:11 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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As part of their "American Experience" series, PBS aired a six hour documentary over three nights last week called The Great War. (Usually repeated, depending on your local PBS channel.)

I was looking at their website for the series which has additional information about certain aspects of the program and many interesting sidelights.

There was a section of less than ten photographs titled: The Homefront In Color

It was noted:
[W]hen the First World War began in 1914, by comparison to black and white image capture, color photography was still relatively rare. As such, most documentation of the Great War that we see today is in black and white.

There were, however, a handful of photographers working in color. One of those was American Charles C. Zoller, a Rochester, New York-based furniture dealer. In the days leading up to the U.S. entry into the Great War in 1917, and in the remaining days of that war, Zoller captured many images of preparations on the American homefront. Browse a collection of those photographs in the gallery below.
Three of the photographs were labeled Los Angeles and one Pasadena! I don't know if exact locations can be gleaned from any of them. All taken 100 years ago. The captions are from the website.




Nurses, 1917.

(Credit: Photo by Charles C. Zoller. Courtesy of the George Eastman Museum.)





Two nurses and child dressed as "Uncle Sam" in a World War I Support Parade in Pasadena, California, 1917.

(Credit: Photo by Charles C. Zoller. Courtesy of the George Eastman Museum.)





World War I Support Parade in Los Angeles, 1917.

(Credit: Photo by Charles C. Zoller. Courtesy of the George Eastman Museum.)





World War I Support Parade in Los Angeles.

(Credit: Photo by Charles C. Zoller. Courtesy of the George Eastman Museum.)



This one did not have a location in the caption, but I thought I'd include it.
The bottom part of the sign on the building to the right says "Dry Goods."



World War I Support Parade, 1917.

(Credit: Photo by Charles C. Zoller. Courtesy of the George Eastman Museum.)
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  #41285  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 6:12 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Incidentally, Charles C. Zoller is also credited with taking the first color photograph of actor Charlie Chaplin.



(Credit: Photo by Charles C. Zoller. Courtesy of the George Eastman Museum.)

Charlie Chaplin was born April 16th. (1889.)

Tourmaline posted about the Chaplin photos:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=17501
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  #41286  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 6:51 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is online now
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Still looking good. A nice spot for tourist snaps:

gsv, 1416 N La Brea

Last edited by tovangar2; Apr 18, 2017 at 4:10 PM.
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  #41287  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 7:00 PM
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I know we've seen the Arthur Murray Studios many times before, but, well, it's Julius Shulman. This is "Job 6479: Stiles Clement - Arthur Murray, 1942".



A side view showing the famous pylon.



The last image is tall and thin, and makes the building look very narrow.



All from Getty Research Institute

These days, the pylon of 5828 Wilshire Boulevard could easily be mistaken for part of the building next door. This GSV image is from May 2016. The most recent ones show the name "Subud California Wilshire Center" above the blue windows, but the images aren't as clear.


GSV
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  #41288  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 7:45 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is online now
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I loved the neon couple that was added to the Arthur Murray sign later. It used to knock me out. I didn't know it wasn't original, until now:

dick wittington, 1948, uscdl

Detail:



...and speaking of buildings on Wilshire w/ pylons, does anyone know the story of the drugstore building on the right? I think we're about at Norton:

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post


julie_wilson's_world flickr
above: Wilshire Blvd. in 1954.

Last edited by tovangar2; Apr 17, 2017 at 8:02 PM.
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  #41289  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 8:06 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post

I loved the neon couple that was added to the Arthur Murray sign later. It used to knock me out. I didn't know it wasn't original, until now.

Detail:





Neon?

The checkerboard exterior treatment seemed perfect for the Fox Hills Foxtrot or the Torrance Tango.

http://www.gstatic.com/hostedimg/8576bf4c88720c5b_large



http://www.gstatic.com/hostedimg/e8ab342fbdcff64e_large





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  #41290  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 8:41 PM
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Last edited by MichaelRyerson; Apr 19, 2017 at 3:46 PM.
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  #41291  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 10:35 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
[...]

...a screengrab from the film "1941" of one of the miniatures of Hollywood Blvd.



Warner backlot of Hollywood Blvd.:



Though movie recreations are often meant to be general rather than historically accurate, I wondered
if anyone had ever seen Hollywood Blvd. decorated with anything other than Christmas Trees along
the street, rather than the Santa Claus option chosen by the art director of this film?
_______________________________________________________________________________________

When I posted that query last year, no one had followed up with any ideas of Hollywood Blvd. ever having been decorated with rows of lighted Santa Claus's instead of the many Christmas tree lined street photos we've seen from many decades. I had never come across any evidence that this had been the case, either. You'd think someone would have taken a photo of such a thing.

Well, at least one person did.





This snapshot that, probably, a soldier took/had taken while visiting Hollywood during WWII, appeared when someone uploaded it on
their Pinterest account and several others have pinned it to theirs, but there's no other information to be gleaned about it.

The marquee in the background is the Paramount Theater, now the El Capitan. The movie playing I deciphered from the "True to" part
that can be read. The film is True to Life, a Paramount film, and was released on Dec. 24th of 1943. The partial names seen on the
marquee turn out to be Mary Martin, Dick Powell, Franchot Tone and Victor Moore. So this photo could have been taken in 1943 or
maybe early 1944.

It's the first definitive proof that I've seen of Santa Claus's lining Hollywood Blvd. at Christmas time, instead of the trees. If the whole
street was lit up with these you'd think there'd have been one photo of that somewhere, as I said, but I guess you never know.

In the distance, by the Chinese Theatre on the right, it does look like those are other Santa Claus's that can be seen lining the street.

Also, I spy a Pacific Electric Red Car coming.
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  #41292  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 10:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post

I loved the neon couple that was added to the Arthur Murray sign later. It used to knock me out. I didn't know it wasn't original, until now:

dick wittington, 1948, uscdl
Arthur Murray....Learn To Dance In a Hurry.

Arthur Murray Taught me dancin' in a hurry;
I had a week to spare,
He showed me the ground work, The walkin' around work,
And told me take it from there!

Arthur Murray Then advised me not to worry;
It would come out all right!
To my way of thinkin' My dance is stinkin',
I don't know my left from my right!

The people around me can all-sing,
"A-one and a-two and a-three",
But any resemblance to waltzing
Is just coincidental with me!

'Cause Arthur Murray Taught me dancin' in a hurry;
And so I took a chance.
To me it resembles The nine day trembles,
But he guarantees it's a dance!

Etc. Link to song here>>>

https://youtu.be/kAOxwg9_PGA
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  #41293  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 1:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beaudry View Post

What really got me was this restaurant/cocktail lounge at 458 S Fig—



There's nothing in the 1956 or '60 street address directories for 458, so I don't know what it was called. (It was known as Park's Coffee Shop in 1936, according to an article in the Times—also, it had its liquor license noirishly suspended in 1954.)

But check out the art deco detailing! So I looked it up in the DBS and it was built in 1928, its architect none other than Gordon B Kaufmann!
So in the span of a few days I've gone from no pictures of this heretofore unknown Kaufmann (buy the book!) to two:



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  #41294  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 3:05 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is online now
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Originally Posted by Beaudry View Post
(buy the book!)
Bloody hell, Beaudry, even used copies are still over $40! (which is far out of my reach).
Does the book tell of how Mr Kaufmann lived and worked in that nice Webber, Staunton & Spaulding building on Carondelet the last 10 years of his life?

lapl/anne laskey, 1978


..............................................................................


ETA some satisfying news. If anyone remembers those two big, old Craftsman apartment buildings I was swooning over yesterday, the Conservancy let me know that they were unaware of the pair until they saw the post. They're hot-footing it over to W 8th & S Park View for proper photographs so the two can eventually be written up.

gsv

I'm chuffed.

Last edited by tovangar2; Apr 18, 2017 at 4:37 AM.
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  #41295  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 5:02 AM
riichkay riichkay is offline
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A series of 4 photos by Ed Ruscha, Beverly Blvd. between Sweetzer and Flores, from National Gallery of Scotland site. Taken in '61 but not printed until 2004. From their caption:


This photograph is from Ruscha’s ‘Rooftops Series’, a set of four prints looking down on Los Angeles intersections from a high vantage point. Ruscha has worked in and based much of his work on the unique characteristics of the city since he was a student in the 1950s. He had been working for an advertising agency between North Flores Street and Beverly Boulevard when he took these shots in 1961, early in his career. They run 360 degrees around the roof of his office building where he took his lunch.












The "Have a Happy Day" billboard, enlarged, shows Carson/Roberts Advertising at the bottom, with the address 8322 Beverly Bl. The figure is pointing across the street at that bldg, so Ruscha was working at that firm.

In the last photo, the bldg with the 2nd rooftop billboard visible, that's the n.e. corner of Beverly and Harper. I enlarged that and read the signage as Adrian's Latin Dance Studio. That bldg is now the trendy restaurant Jar. A charming sequence in La La Land has Emma Stone fleeing dinner from her pill of a boyfriend at Jar, exiting a back door on Beverly, running around the corner past the restaurant's main entrance and heading up on Harper to her car....the street dressed with the old concrete lamposts, which appear everywhere in the film. She then heads to the theater where the guy she really wants to be with is waiting for her....here's the clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuEPCRYtrYU

gsv




Here's the Jar bldg

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  #41296  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 6:11 AM
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Flyingwedge Flyingwedge is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
ETA some satisfying news. If anyone remembers those two big, old Craftsman apartment buildings I was swooning over yesterday, the Conservancy let me know that they were unaware of the pair until they saw the post. They're hot-footing it over to W 8th & S Park View for proper photographs so the two can eventually be written up.

gsv

I'm chuffed.
Yay! Nice work! Those are a couple of handsome old buildings.
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  #41297  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 8:04 AM
ScottyB ScottyB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
ETA some satisfying news. If anyone remembers those two big, old Craftsman apartment buildings I was swooning over yesterday, the Conservancy let me know that they were unaware of the pair until they saw the post. They're hot-footing it over to W 8th & S Park View for proper photographs so the two can eventually be written up.


I'm chuffed.
Very nice! Gratifying to know this thread can have an impact on the ground, too, as it were.
Here's a Gas Station, NE corner S Los Robles and Mission, San Marino, 1930.



http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis.../rv/singleitem

The building in the background caught my attention upon zooming...as well as the levitated (Packard?) automobile behind the station.



I'll try to drive by and see if it's still there. GSV inconclusive.


Last edited by ScottyB; Apr 18, 2017 at 8:17 AM.
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  #41298  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 2:50 PM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
Bloody hell, Beaudry, even used copies are still over $40! (which is far out of my reach).
Does the book tell of how Mr Kaufmann lived and worked in that nice Webber, Staunton & Spaulding building on Carondelet the last 10 years of his life?

lapl/anne laskey, 1978


..............................................................................


ETA some satisfying news. If anyone remembers those two big, old Craftsman apartment buildings I was swooning over yesterday, the Conservancy let me know that they were unaware of the pair until they saw the post. They're hot-footing it over to W 8th & S Park View for proper photographs so the two can eventually be written up.

gsv

I'm chuffed.
If I remember correctly, someone owes you a beer.
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  #41299  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 5:39 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riichkay View Post
A series of 4 photos by Ed Ruscha, Beverly Blvd. between Sweetzer and Flores, from National Gallery of Scotland site. Taken in '61 but not printed until 2004.

In the last photo, the bldg with the 2nd rooftop billboard visible, that's the n.e. corner of Beverly and Harper. I enlarged that and read the signage as Adrian's Latin Dance Studio. That bldg is now the trendy restaurant Jar.
_______

Thanks for the interesting Ruscha photos, riichkay. And I was going to walk by the Jar restaurant next time I have an appointment in that area to see that filming location for La La Land. I'd be up for one of their "Gimlet's" there...if anyone's on an expense account.
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  #41300  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 7:00 PM
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HossC HossC is online now
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Seeing as yesterday's posts by tovangar2 and BifRayRock gave us pictures of the Arthur Murray Studios with the Prudential building in the background, I thought I'd make it the subject of today's Julius Shulman post. This is "Job 18: Wurdeman & Becket, Prudential Building, rendering, 1947". There's only one images in this set.



Getty Research Institute
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