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  #201  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2010, 1:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nowhereman1280 View Post
Yeah, I was gonna say...
I'm not surprised it went over certain people's heads. This thread is hardly intellectual.
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  #202  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2010, 4:04 PM
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  #203  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2010, 4:29 PM
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  #204  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2010, 12:00 AM
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  #205  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2010, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
I am totally serious. Art is part of architecture, but architecture is not art. That difference is absolutely essential.
I suggest that existence is itself a form of artistic expression. Thus even the simplest housing constructed for the sole purpose of protecting its inhabitant from the elements is reflective of rational philosophy.

Anything that employs the process of changing matter from one form into a more advanced form is art. Inasmuch as our existence is itself an ongoing phase of evolution and gradual progressive change, we and all that we do, including architecture, is art. The two cannot be separated.
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  #206  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2010, 8:57 PM
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This thread is *full* of temples and other grand buildings. I think it would be better with some more everyday buildings.

Quote:
I suggest that existence is itself a form of artistic expression.
I don't necessarily disagree if we're being philosophical, but what does that mean in practice, when it comes time to actually design something? I think it is a major problem that the architecture profession is more interested in waxing poetic than in designing attractive and functional (and functionally urban) buildings. Whatever deeper meanings are imparted in buildings are absolutely meaningless if the building fails.
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  #207  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2010, 11:42 PM
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Last edited by Hed Kandi; Jun 29, 2016 at 3:55 PM.
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  #208  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2010, 4:15 PM
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65 East Goethe - the only Lagrange building that actually came out well.

All photos from Lucien Lagrange:


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  #209  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2010, 5:59 PM
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^Well those are nice windows at least.
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  #210  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2010, 6:32 PM
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^^
I think that's an interesting example that is worth posting.

To really qualify it would need better detailing and a different material for the cap, but nonetheless I think it's an attractive building.
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  #211  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2010, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by jens View Post
Tianjin Concert Hall, China

Tianjin Concert Hall is a new 650-seater concert hall built in a pastiche of classical European style in the heart of the city. It's located next to the Xiaobailou subway station on Line One and has limited underground parking. There are a number of restaurants, bars and cafes nearby.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/wmbenson/3519152165/


http://www.flickr.com/photos/chineseemma319/4200198636/


http://www.tianjinexpats.com/event-list/venueevents/894-tianjin-concert-hall/archive
whoa, good find. it looks like a state capitol.

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  #212  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2010, 7:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ch.G, Ch.G View Post
Unfortunately.

Yale has an amazing architectural tradition, but the most recent residential colleges, Morse and Ezra Stiles, both designed by Eero Saarinen in a then ostensibly "progressive" style, weren't (and continue to not be) very well-received by students. The university has been much more conservative with many of its newer buildings (as opposed to, say, the University of Chicago, a peer institution which continues to push for truly progressive design). These new residential colleges unfortunately continue that vein. Even with Bob Stern at the helm of their design, I have a hard time envisioning them as anything more than simulacra of American collegiate gothic, which is already something of a simulacrum itself.
Every building is a simulacrum of some previous precedent, at least in some way. There's no shame in that, as styles and construction can't be fundamentally reinvented every single time a building goes up. What matters is whether the design is well done, with attention to detail and overall workability. If that is accomplished, why would emulating an old style be a problem?
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  #213  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2010, 9:09 PM
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535 West End ave. came out pretty well for a Lagrange. Not great, but pretty well:

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  #214  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2010, 9:17 PM
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Also, just for the hell of it, here's Takashimaya in NYC:




Soon to be turned into this:

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  #215  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2010, 10:13 PM
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^
You know, the base of that building isn't bad. The first 5 floors or so are actually quite good. But that shaft is just terrible. Horribly, horribly out of proportion.

In any event, I think it's too po-mo to qualify.
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  #216  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2010, 9:11 PM
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Some new buildings at Hendrix College in Conway Arkansas.











Photos by me.
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  #217  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2010, 10:57 PM
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The base of that building starts out nice, but like Cirrus said, past the first few floors the building just goes straight to hell. It's quite awful, really.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vandelay View Post
Also, just for the hell of it, here's Takashimaya in NYC:

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  #218  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2010, 12:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
This thread is *full* of temples and other grand buildings. I think it would be better with some more everyday buildings.

I don't necessarily disagree if we're being philosophical, but what does that mean in practice, when it comes time to actually design something? I think it is a major problem that the architecture profession is more interested in waxing poetic than in designing attractive and functional (and functionally urban) buildings. Whatever deeper meanings are imparted in buildings are absolutely meaningless if the building fails.
I totally agree with you on that. Architecture today is unfortunately based around the notion of expression and deeper meanings first, before an actually aesthetically pleasing design and style that actually works, which is wrong. If I were to design a building today, I would choose a style that works for the area, for instance art deco for new york, and try to bring originality and meaning to it from there as the next step.
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  #219  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2010, 3:13 PM
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I stumbled upon these pictures of Beirut (Lebanon). Quite amazing
Courtesy of P Donovan






courtesy of joya








Courtesy of Rana T:


Courtesy of Nassim Ghandour:



AUB (Clock Tower)
Courtesy of Ianwar horizon
>>> Scroll right


Courtesy of haitham





courtesy of RAA










Solidere












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  #220  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2010, 5:01 PM
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Beirut is looking beautiful. Like Paris
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