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  #21  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 3:04 AM
sbarn sbarn is offline
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I grew up in the Silicon Valley but have been living in NYC for over 8 years. Having knowledge of both, I do know that while the number of start ups in NYC has grown dramatically in the past few years, it's still behind the Bay Area. As for Google and Microsoft, they both have massive operations in NYC but they're primarily focused on the advertising and marketing sectors of their business, while the high tech / core operations of their businesses remain in California and Washington respectively.
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  #22  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 4:02 AM
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Not to take this any further from the OP's intent, but since we're on the topic...

The Brookings Institute just released a study on patenting and innovation in American metros; this could be a poxy of sorts for "Top Tech Start Up Centers" in the US:

http://www.brookings.edu/research/in...metropatenting

Metro (not CSA) Ranked by Average Number of Patents Filed, 5 Year Median 2007-2011:

1. San Jose: 9,237
2. San Francisco: 7,003
3. New York: 6,907
4. Los Angeles: 5,456
5. Seattle: 3,968
6. Boston: 3,965
7. Chicago: 3,886
8. San Diego: 3,165
9. Minneapolis: 3,065
10. Detroit: 2,720

If you play around with the CSA numbers...

1. San Francisco-San Jose CSA: 16,240
2. New York CSA: 9,729
3. Los Angeles CSA: 6,005
4. Boston CSA: 5,652
5. Chicago CSA: 4,052
6. Seattle CSA: 4,044
7. Detroit CSA: 3,501
8. San Diego MSA: 3,165
9. Minneapolis CSA: 3,065
10. Austin CSA: 2,497

A while ago someone from the Bay Area posted what I think was a PWC whitepaper on venture capital by markets, 2011. The rankings looked similar, with the Bay Area seeing about 4x the amount of VC as the Boston CSA (#2) and about 6 times that of New York (#3).
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  #23  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 7:06 AM
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If Arch City is Raymond Gobberg, I want to meet him!
Right????
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  #24  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 1:40 PM
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^ Since we're all trolls at this point, this data clearly shows that the Bay Area, Seattle, and Boston are punching FAR above their weight in patents/venture capital. Detroit also seems to be doing slightly better than expected.

Otherwise, the rest of the metros are middle of the field, when taking their size into consideration
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  #25  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 9:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
Not to take this any further from the OP's intent, but since we're on the topic...

The Brookings Institute just released a study on patenting and innovation in
American metros; this could be a poxy of sorts for "Top Tech Start Up Centers" in the US:
I don't think the amount of "patents" alone makes a city/region a "Top Tech Start-Up Center" and further a patent could have been achieved by a professor of a local university doing simple research and in the process of his/her discovery realizes that the discovery needs to be patented i.e. authenticated. Sometimes a single researcher will apply for multiple patents on one study.

Also, a lot of Detroit's patents, for example, are likely to be in the automotive industry. In Houston, patents are likely driven by innovation in the energy industry. In Minneapolis they are likely medical instruments. In St. Louis, patents are typically in the plant sciences, medicine and pharmaceuticals. Also, many patents are created within companies so many times there is no need to "start up" anything - just innovate off the discovery and patent if warranted.

Many patents are used to develop new products or improvements, yielding profits and licensing fees for the companies, universities or individuals who own them. Sometimes they lead to new local design, engineering or manufacturing operations.

In other words, while patents can be used to measure innovation, patents don't necessarily lead to the creation of an actual start-up although there have been many cases where researchers and companies have launched start-up firms based on certain patents.

I think it is apples and oranges.

In the case of Fox Business News' tech story on St. Louis, its angle alludes to the growing tech and social media start-up scene in the St. Louis city/region. It's based on geeks finding St. Louis an attractive climate to start their tech and social media firms – not patents. Hopefully, however, patent registration will continue to grow in St. Louis.
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  #26  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by sbarn View Post
I grew up in the Silicon Valley but have been living in NYC for over 8 years. Having knowledge of both, I do know that while the number of start ups in NYC has grown dramatically in the past few years, it's still behind the Bay Area. As for Google and Microsoft, they both have massive operations in NYC but they're primarily focused on the advertising and marketing sectors of their business, while the high tech / core operations of their businesses remain in California and Washington respectively.
I was going to say the same thing. NYC has a lot of startup activity when it comes to media, advertising, marketing, and internet-focused sectors, which are of growing importance, but the Bay Area has a presence is almost every large sector attracting venture capital, including but not limited to cleantech, life sciences, enterprise, IT, consumer technology, etc.

NYC is a very important market to have a presence given the human and financial capital that exists there, but it's not really equivalent to Silicon Valley yet. I think there is an ongoing shift when it comes to the culture of entrepreneurship and the political actions needed to foster it in NYC and its doing a better job than other places.
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  #27  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 10:47 PM
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Number of start ups by metro as of August 2012:


Source: USA Today


Quote:
Originally Posted by Arch City View Post
In the case of Fox Business News' tech story on St. Louis, its angle alludes to the growing tech and social media start-up scene in the St. Louis city/region. It's based on geeks finding St. Louis an attractive climate to start their tech and social media firms – not patents. Hopefully, however, patent registration will continue to grow in St. Louis.
Sorry to hijack the thread. I think its great that start ups are growing in St. Louis! Thanks for posting...
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  #28  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 12:00 AM
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Sorry to hijack the thread. I think its great that start ups are growing in St. Louis! Thanks for posting...
It's no biggie. Truth is, there are some people who can't stand to see another city/region get some positive press in areas/markets/sectors where their city/regions tend to dominate.

St. Louis is no Silicon Valley, but it is emerging and some good stuff is coming out the area and some of it has been better than what has come from the coasts.

Haters!! Deuces!
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  #29  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 4:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Arch City View Post
ISt. Louis is no Silicon Valley, but it is emerging and some good stuff is coming out the area and some of it has been better than what has come from the coasts.
This is a good thing for the country, we need more specialized nodes popping up. When everything is concentrated in one or two nodes, innovation can get a bit stale.

That being said, I'd disagree a bit with your take on patents. Especially for social media and app development. This is a big part of my industry, and one of the roles I play in my company is identifying social and app start-ups in local APAC markets for potential buying. When we do our due diligence, one of the first thing we check is to see if the start-ups have patented any of their code, processes or design/UI elements. The legal realities behind today's digital development basically require you patent your IP before going to market with a product. If you don't, someone else will legally bring your ideas to market properly protected about a day after you launch. And there's nothing you can do about it other than rue your poor planning and/or poor legal advice.
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  #30  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 5:03 AM
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That Top 10 list is pretty much what I expected. The Bay Area absolutely dominates not only the U.S. but the world in start-up venture capital and tech innovation. Boston, NYC and LA are large centers and the only ones with over a billion dollars in venture capital. The others are well-known tech cities.
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  #31  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 5:42 AM
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Hey, I'm glad the tech sector is growing rapidly in St. Louis. It's a great city and can use as diverse economy as it can get.

I can think of another benefit to having several different tech nodes spread throughout the country, rather than just a couple big nodes--it gives young workers the choice to avoid living in a place with an overheated cost of living like we suffer in the Bay Area. I would imagine a programmer could live pretty damn well in a city like St. Louis.
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  #32  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:33 PM
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Hey, I'm glad the tech sector is growing rapidly in St. Louis. It's a great city and can use as diverse economy as it can get.

I can think of another benefit to having several different tech nodes spread throughout the country, rather than just a couple big nodes--it gives young workers the choice to avoid living in a place with an overheated cost of living like we suffer in the Bay Area. I would imagine a programmer could live pretty damn well in a city like St. Louis.
True. And check out these recent stats.


Source, Jan 22, 2013


Source, Mashable
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  #33  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:41 PM
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Jan 22, 2013, 11:36am CST
More jobs and higher pay for St. Louis IT workers
Reporter-Amir Kurtovic

St. Louis IT professionals have seen a 13 percent pay increase in 2012 on average and can expect more well paying jobs in 2013, according to two reports out today.

St. Louis was one of several Midwestern cities that have seen an increase in IT jobs and can expect to see continued growth in 2013, according to Modis, a national staffing firm.

The firm looked at job availability and trends in its branch network across the country and found that St. Louis, like Minneapolis and Omaha, was experiencing growth in IT jobs. The company cited cost cutting measures as a likely source of the trend, as national firms work to move high-paying jobs from the coast to cities with a lower-than-average cost of living and an educated workforce.

St. Louis IT workers have more reasons to be happy. The average IT salary in 2012 in St. Louis was $81,245, according to the 2013-2012 Salary Survey from Dice, a job search site for technology and engineer professionals.

Only Pittsburgh-based tech professionals saw higher average salary increases last year, reporting 18 percent growth to $76,207.

Overall, 2012 was a good year to be working in IT. Tech professionals earned a greater than five percent increase in average annual wages to $85,619, up from $81,327 in 2011, according to the Dice survey.
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  #34  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 8:09 PM
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Since this thread was hijacked with tech talk.........

Here's a recent mayor's press conference regarding the official announcement that The Hudson's Bay Company (Lord & Taylor, The Bay Co. etc.) will locate its North American Information Services Operations Center in downtown St. Louis - bringing 137 new tech jobs to the St. Louis region - despite the fact there are no Hudson's Bay stores in the greater St. Louis area. Some tech jobs are being relocated from Toronto and New York.

Video Link
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Last edited by Arch City; Feb 7, 2013 at 8:26 PM.
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  #35  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2013, 12:15 AM
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^Call center?
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  #36  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2013, 2:27 AM
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(Not related to the call center point)

Regarding tech salaries and job counts, it's funny how massively different each analysis is. They all seem to count vastly different things.

Is everyone who works for a tech company a tech employee? Admin assistants, accountants, salespeople, cafeteria workers, janitors? Some surveys count all of them. Others focus on certain professions.

Does tech mean computers and internet only, or does it also include biotech, phone service, aircraft, and working at Radio Shack? What about people who teach CAD/BIM? What about internet retailers?

When they say what they're counting, that's useful. When they don't, it's mostly perplexing.
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  #37  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2013, 4:38 AM
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^Call center?
Nope.
__________________________________________



Dec 11, 2012, 5:52pm CST UPDATED: Dec 11, 2012, 7:49pm CST
Hudson’s Bay: 137 new IT jobs in next 12 months
Matthew Hibbard
Social Engagement Manager -
St. Louis Business Journal

Hudson’s Bay Co. officially announced the opening of its Information Services Delivery center at 500 N. Broadway downtown this afternoon.

The retail holding company said it will create 137 jobs within the next 12 months, according to Bill Tracy, vice president of supply chain, logistics and information services for the Hudson’s Bay Co. Those jobs include everything under the umbrella of information services from system developers and business analysts to project managers, coding technicians and programmers. Tracy said there will also be workers who will support the company’s data center operations.

Hudson’s Bay, which operates the Lord & Taylor brand in the U.S. and the Bay brand in Canada, is in the midst of consolidating its IT operations, which are currently in Toronto. Tracy said in the short-term the company’s data center operations will remain in Toronto, however he said in the next two years the company could relocate their data center to St. Louis. Tracy said they need about 80,000 square feet of data center space and have the opportunity to build inside 500 N. Broadway or lease space elsewhere in town.

In addition to adding new employees, the company is building out three floors inside the building. The construction coincides with a more than $10 million renovation of the office building, owned by BEB Management.

Hudson’s Bay Co. is recruiting its new employees from local universities including, the University of Missouri - Columbia, University of Missouri - St. Louis, Missouri University of Science and Technology and Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Tracy, who previously worked for May Co., said while St. Louis provides cheaper housing and lifestyle options than Toronto he said the deciding factor for choosing St. Louis was the talent pool. At his time with May Co., Tracy remembered how the IT department was one of the company's great strengths and he wants to replicate that.
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  #38  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2013, 5:31 AM
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Thanks for the clarification. Is the tower pictured the workplace?
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  #39  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2013, 10:02 PM
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Thanks for the clarification. Is the tower pictured the workplace?
Yes. The tower is now home to HBC IT as well as a few other firms.
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  #40  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2013, 1:18 AM
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Cambridge Innovation Center branches out
By Michael B. Farrell | GLOBE STAFF
FEBRUARY 18, 2013



The Cambridge Innovation Center, one of the largest such operations in the country, may expand to St. Louis and Baltimore.

After 14 years of helping Kendall Square become a national hot spot for technology companies, the Cambridge Innovation Center is looking to replicate its success in other cities.

The Kendall operation is in talks to open two new innovation centers, one in Baltimore and another in St. Louis, by the end of 2013. Since opening in 1999, the Innovation Center has helped launch more than 1,200 companies by providing low-cost shared office spaces, fast Internet service, stocked kitchens, and a communal environment where budding entrepreneurs can mix.

“We are really trying to create communities of people who are making an impact,” said Tim Rowe, chief executive of the Cambridge center. “We really should be doing that everywhere.”

The center is also branching out locally from its current operation in a high-rise near the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to a second building in Kendall Square that would boost its total footprint to more than 200,000 square feet.

It’s also helping to launch several similar start-up centers in Cambridge that will operate on their own. One is The Hub, a space intended for socially minded start-ups, and the other is LabCentral, which will provide lab and office space for life sciences companies.

Such shared working spaces ¬— where small start-ups can rent desks or even small offices with amenities such as copiers and coffee — have become much more popular in Boston and around the country over the past few years. For example, the Boston shared office space Workbar plans to open a second location in Cambridge next month that will offer 12,000 square feet on two floors in Central Square.

The Cambridge Innovation Center is the largest in the Boston area and one of the biggest in the country. It rents desk space for about $500 a month; an office with a view costs about $3,000. Its tenants include Amazon.com Inc., which has plans to open an office nearby in the coming months, small venture capital firms, and dozens of tech start-ups.

The center benefits from entrepreneurs who want to be in the technology hotbed of Kendall Square and close to MIT without having to pay full freight for regular office space, which is among the most expensive in the Boston area.

There’s also a larger trend afoot of entrepreneurs wanting to work around like-minded people instead of alone in basements and garages, said Heidi Neck, the Jeffry A. Timmons professor of entrepreneurial studies at Babson College.

“The ability for entrepreneurs to come together in a face-to-face setting matters,” she said. “There’s a certain support there that can’t be matched online just yet.”

These sorts of start-up clusters, especially around institutions such as MIT that turn out computer science graduates, are breeding more businesses, she said. “You’re going to be motivated to give it a shot because everyone else is doing it,” Neck said. “That doesn’t mean they’ll succeed, but the propensity to start will be greater.”

Baltimore and St. Louis are just two examples of places where business organizations and municipalities are investing millions of dollars to encourage start-up growth. In St. Louis, an organization called Arch Grants is attempting to lure young companies there with a $1 million contest.

(Read More)
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