HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Atlantic Provinces > St. John's

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #21  
Old Posted May 3, 2014, 9:02 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
Hey, as I mentioned in the other thread, Townie - you're an awesome photographer! I love those pics. Especially the sunrise ones with ice-covered bushes.

*****

May 2, 2014



































__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #22  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2014, 10:37 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496




















































































__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #23  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2014, 8:38 PM
Townie709's Avatar
Townie709 Townie709 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: St. John's, Newfoundland
Posts: 1,772
Literally jaw dropping photos!!!! I'm in love xD

Edit: we must have been really close to eachother today because I got an almost identical shot of that yellow boat in front of the iceberg! What time was it and where was it taken??
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #24  
Old Posted Jun 23, 2014, 4:49 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
Thanks, Townie.

June 23, 2014

The biggest iceberg of the year crossed the Narrows this morning.

Set to one of our most emblematic folk songs. The Peace Tower on Parliament Hill in Ottawa (Canada's capital) played this song on its bells when we joined Canada in 1949.

Video Link
































__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #25  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2014, 9:53 PM
AnUrbanLife's Avatar
AnUrbanLife AnUrbanLife is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 146
Wowee! incredible photos

On a side note, does anyone know why the clocks on the Basilica's twin towers are set to different times? Just curious.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #26  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2014, 10:00 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
June 30, 2014

Video Link


A gorgeous summer day in St. John's.

Skipper and his missus were sot up in one of the busiest intersections in Rabbittown right at the bottom of my street reading the paper.



Walking downhill toward downtown. I really love the change that's happening lately where people are going SUPER bold with their colours. It was always bright, but the colours were just more saturated versions of normal, suburban colours. Since the suburbs are now that colourful, homeowners downtown are going all out.

My favourite thus far is bright purple with powder blue trim and orange shutters/door.



Skeets guarding the stairs to bum smokes from folks descending to the downtown.



It was so nice to see a few people on the go. The city has felt deserted with all the 8C weather over the past few todays. It was still a little dead by the time I got to go downtown, but I cherished every minute just the same.



Wing'in It is a VERY popular and expanding local wings franchise, and it's close to new Gower Street, which cuts through Old Town with its modernity.



The Queen's Road Store has been a local landmark my entire lifetime, and probably much longer. It's not quite a dep like our superettes, but close.



George Street was pretty full for before end-of-workday, which was lovely. And although it wasn't hot enough for the hotties to have their shirts off, at least they were out.



Take it off!



This is not a self portrait:



The corner of George Street, Water Street, and Beck's Cove.



Looking down Water Street toward Fortis Place:



Ziggy Peelgood's, man. You don't even know. Fries, dressing, and gravy at 4 a.m. on George Street. Yes, ma'am.



My ratio of visible minorities to whites in many of these photos is higher than the city's average, BUT that's how it was in the downtown today. Very nice to see!



It's tobacco, though. Not weed.



Water Street East, heading away from the bustling area.



A couple of violinists were out doing their thing.







The steep stairs next to the Supreme Court of Newfoundland:



Heading toward Harbourside Park and the National Memorial Memorial. We could hear bagpipes, apparently there was an impromptu session on the go. Some hipsters even joined in with drums.



Like a dream, b'ys.





I took about 10 photos of the crowd playing the bagpipes. I chose this one for an obvious reason.



Heading back uphill and home. A view toward the National War Memorial from Duckworth Street.



Metroverse. At all the bus stops, they have excerpts by local writers. I love this city.

__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #27  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2014, 10:15 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
July 16, 2014

Video Link

Old, but so is the city...







And St. John's is all decked out for Pride Week. I took these on my short stroll - Pride flags only. I'd have to take a picture of every business if I included Pride posters, etc.











And a few more courtesy of friends on Facebook:





*****

And a few pictures of our Pride Bonfire last night.





__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."

Last edited by SignalHillHiker; Jul 16, 2014 at 10:29 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #28  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2014, 3:37 PM
Stryker Stryker is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post

This one is my fave.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #29  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2014, 3:38 PM
Stryker Stryker is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
July 16, 2014

Video Link

Old, but so is the city...



, I meant this one sorry.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #30  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2014, 4:59 AM
MrChills's Avatar
MrChills MrChills is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Glovertown, Newfoundland
Posts: 539
It's been SOOOOOOOOOO long since I've been on here.. Not sure what happened, it was a daily place for nearly 10 years and now probably a year since I've visited the forum. Anyway, I had to pick my jaw off the floor for some of the photos Signal. Amazing! I have some new screen savers to add to the six monitors I sit in front of at work tonight. Don't be afraid to add some more!
__________________
Those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind
http://twitter.com/thefeltham
http://reverbnation.com/overlay
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #31  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2014, 5:15 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
Hehehe, aww. Thank you!
__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #32  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2014, 4:42 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
Open Doors

This weekend, St. John's - the capital of Newfoundland and Labrador - threw open the doors to many of its buildings that are normally not accessible to the public.

We - Joanne, Aisling, Shannon, Marc, and I - went to at least half of the downtown ones.

Video Link


We started at the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador. It's still a proper English court, they start every session with "Hear ye, ye, ye!" and all of that.

This is the backside. It's like 10 floors high on the other side.



The High Sheriff was such a charmer.





The building had some interesting views of the backs of Duckworth Street buildings. St. John's is steep. All of these buildings are 2-3 floors at street level on the other side.





Then it was on to the Roman Catholic Basilica of St. John the Baptist. It was the inspiration for St. Patrick's in New York City. Their bishop came to the consecration and was annoyed that St. John's had a grander church than New York City.

St. Patrick's passed St. John's to become the largest Irish-built church in North America (we're still second).













The church boasts a number of relics (Saint Theresa's kneecap, etc.) as well as many statues and crosses of which there are only a handful of other versions (almost all of which are in Ireland or the Vatican).

The adjacent convent hosts the world-famous Veiled Virgin statue, but it's rarely accessible to the public. We missed this month's two tours by one day.



The church has a crypt as well, where the bishops are buried. Roman Catholicism was illegal in Newfoundland until 1832, so Catholic churches only (offically) date to then. Our oldest Anglican Church of England church is from 1699.







Then it's on to the Newman Wine Vaults, where Newfoundland's famous port is made/stored.

Video Link










And then Government House. Traditionally, this was the residence of our Governor General (Queen Elizabeth II's representative in Newfoundland, and our official head of government). Since joining Canada in 1949, it is now the residence of our Lieutenant Governor (same thing, but second to Canada's Governor General).







A memorial to the son of a former Governor General who drowned saving two young women from a nearby river.



My favourite house in the city. Long and narrow. Standing inside, you can touch both sides with your hands at once.





The Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (our police force) had its stables open to public. So much fun!







Then on to Commissariat House. This place is awesome. They host dinners where you can pay $65 to dine like a servant, or $125 to dine like a member of the household.

Video Link














The Crow's Nest, an officer's club. They have a periscope from a Nazi Uboat that you can use to view the Old City.















Our National War Memorial. The wreaths laid during official ceremonies on Memorial Day (July 1) are left until they are replaced on Armistice Day (November 11).



The intersection of Military Road (which we're on), Gower Street (the one that goes sharp left), as well as Ordnance Street, King's Bridge Road, Forest Road, Duckworth Street, and Plymouth Street. Collectively known as Cavendish Square.





Then we took a break to go to George Street and get something to eat.

Video Link


















It was SO FUCKING WINDY today. We are, by far, the windiest city in North America. But usually it's pretty sheltered downtown. Not today.







The Anglican Cathedral of St. John the Baptist.





The Masonic Temple, now home to the Spirit of Newfoundland Dinner Theatre. Kind of sad... they "ruled the world", and now their temple performs ABBA.













Gower Street United Church, one of the very first non-Anglican, non-Catholic churches in Newfoundland. To this day, those are the two dominant churches. Everything else is an also-ran.

Video Link




Home to some of the most fucked up crosswalks in St. John's. When we joined Canada in 1949, we switched from driving on the left side of the road to the right, and we also abolished all the city's roundabouts.

The resulting mess makes about as much sense as you've expect.















The famous harp stairs.











The pink, the Rose of England shows
The green, St. Patrick's emblem, bright
While, in between, the spotless sheen
Of Andrew's Cross displays the white

So hail the pink, the white, the green
Our patriot flag, long may it stand
Our sirelands twine their emblems trine
To form the flag of Newfoundland




And then it's on to the fishing village of Quidi Vidi (if you're from there, you pronounce it Kwhy-da Vye-da; if you're from anywhere else, you pronounce it Kiddie Viddie), which is just over the hillside from downtown - literally five minutes. This is closer to downtown than our generic North American suburbs.

Video Link






The Quidi Vidi Plantation is an artists' residence. Artists rent one of the dozens of little rooms to create their work.









Hurling is the national sport of Ireland, and a hipster favourite in Newfoundland.



Marc didn't realize he was in frame.









Also, I did a bad thing...

__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #33  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2014, 4:42 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
Now, on to cruise ships!

September and October are cruise season in St. John's, when the vast majority of liners that visit our city arrive.

They come in Autumn primarily because we're not popular enough to warrant Summer/Winter visits, which are typically in Europe and the Caribbean instead. And Spring is our foggy season so it's not wise to come then.

But I don't mind it at all. I love the last surge of tourists the cruise ships bring when the regular fly-in, drive-in crowd have long since returned home.

Also, most of the passengers tend to be European - which is always a lovely treat.

The city goes all out for the cruise ships as well. They have many of our most talented musicians welcome the ships, they get the excitement of sailing through the narrow entrance of our harbour on a massive liner, and - no matter the time of night of their departure - the city puts on a show, firing its cannons and serenading the passing ship from Fort Amherst. At night, it's so quiet you can hear every note, and hear the clapping and cheering from the passengers. I love it!

So, a few pictures of two ships that visited this week:

Video Link










The ship has to pass between the green and red markers on the left.







For the second liner, Ayreonaut, Aisling, and I hiked out to the edge of Signal Hill to get it from the other side. It got too dark to get really beautiful shots by the time it left without them being blurry. But it's still a wonderful experience.



If you look at the city itself, you'll see two bright lights already shining. Those are the pilot lights. Ships entering the Narrows have to have those perfectly aligned with one directly above the other in order to safely pass between the rocky shores.





There were LOTS of photographers out and about. There's one standing on some ruins down in the lower right.















The walk back to the city from the edge of Signal Hill.









__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #34  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2014, 4:43 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
A few scenes from this morning's hike.

Set to the tune of our own Amelia Curran.

Video Link




The roof you see below this house's bridge is another house. It's that steep.



If any of you want to live like fraggles, there's a Battery shack for sale. Only $359,900.











__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2014, 4:43 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
I hiked up to the top of the Southside Hills to check out the Autumn colours. There were some patches that are starting to change - but it wasn't worth the hike. Took some shots of the dearest city in the world to me instead.

Video Link






It only took about 45 minutes to climb to the top of the Narrows.



And that's where I set up shop.



Now, some shots not taken with my mobile...



Downtown.









Georgestown.



Pleasantville, Bally Hally, and East End.



St. Thomas Anglican Church and Cavendish Square.



MetroPark under construction.



Rabbittown - my neighbourhood.



The Ecclesiastical District (border between Rabbittown to the left and Georgestown to the right). Everything downhill is Downtown.





Confederation Building and the new YMCA-YWCA.



Elizabeth Avenue and East End.





Back downhill in time for a Japanese vessel to leave.





__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #36  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2014, 4:44 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
So, today I cried in the streets. No joke. And I have no idea why, really - it's not a particularly emotional issue for me. Today was the March of the Florizel, the re-enactment of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment's 1914 parade from its barracks in Pleasantville to the St. John's waterfront, where the men and boys boarded the Florizel and headed off to defend the United Kingdom.

More than the entire population of St. John's at the time turned out to see them off in 1914. And, while the crowds were smaller a century later, they certainly didn't disappoint. I was expecting something similar to the annual Battle of Britain Parade a few weeks ago - a couple hundred in the parade, and maybe 100 onlookers.

I was all smiles, enjoying the pageantry of it all, until I saw the crowd following the parade to pay its respects. Hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people, unscheduled, just marching through the streets behind the parade in silence - and dozens of them wearing blue Forget-Me-Nots (it's like the poppy in Britain and Canada, which we also use).

It just... slayed me. I could hardly talk. So ridiculous. But gorgeous day for it!

Video Link


The city was festooned in Honour Our 100 posters.











































They broke out the Blue Puttees they're named after for one of the first times in the past century.











Premier Davis speaking at the ceremony on the harbourfront.



And, right on queue, the sky turned overcast.





__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #37  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2014, 4:44 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
I woke up at 5 a.m. this morning and couldn't get back to sleep, so at around 7 a.m. I decided to go for a little walk about town.

This time I went west, almost as far as the Village Mall, and took some photos in the Waterford Valley/Riverhead/Old West End neighbourhoods, where I rarely venture.



Video Link


Leaving my street. Mind the poles.



The skeetiest house in Rabbittown.



Pennywell Road. Not to be confused with New Pennywell Road and Old Pennywell Road.



Mind the bay windows blocking the sidewalk.



Lipstick on a pig, b'ys.





Peeking down a little side street. You can see Signal Hill from everywhere.



WAY more duplexes out in this part of town.





Brazil Street. People in the West End had their views blocked by modernity decades ago. They're still pissed off about it and show up to protest every proposal. "If this was a wealthy area, the city would've never allowed these buildings to go up."



There are some nicer sections out this far, though.



Many of the people who live on this street chose it for the name. I know a couple. Considered it myself.



SO MANY DUPLEXES.



Rest in peace, fair lady.



If buy a case of beer with your welfare cheque, get drunk, and squint... it could be an homage to Montreal.



Lots of apartment buildings tucked away in the central courtyards of the duplex blocks.



Patrick Street. This was once a VERY prestigious neighbourhood, but it's become a little rundown and there's lots of lower-quality in-fill.



You can see Signal Hill from here too.



Some streets are as steep as those of the East End.



You do see one thing, not often but with some regularity, in the West End that simply doesn't exist in the East End:





The West End has some odd buildings, like an outdated fire station (all the others in the city have an identical, modern design).



And all of the commercial areas in the West End are under-used.



There are also a lot of factories. There are a few in the East End too, but there seemed to be more of them in the West End.



There are also far fewer superettes (our equivalent of the dep - small selection of groceries, a deli, booze, cigs, lottery, whatever).



And all of the modern in-fill rowhomes have beautiful front drivelawns.





These areas are well outside even the weakest heritage protection zones. Anything goes.







There are also many random pockets of typical suburbia as in-fill.



The process is just beginning for this old property. The existing structure will be refurbished and the extensive estate is being divided up into apartment buildings and townhomes. That's basically the way all of the West End developed.



Mind the fences. They, too, can block the sidewalk.



Stop and smell the flowers. Or don't. They're rotting and stink.



Craigmillar Avenue, the very edge of the old town area. It's all modern after this.



Luckily, they have escape lanes like the East End. I was able to tuck down through the houses to Old Topsail Road.







And from Old Topsail Road I cut down through the General Protestant Cemetery to Waterford Bridge Road.



Never forget who you are or where you come from.



The grand, old estates of Waterford Bridge Road was divided up before WWII, so the new developments down there tend to be of a higher and more beautiful quality than elsewhere in the West End.



St. John's has an abundance of snails. No idea why. I've found up to 20 on my house.

I saved these four.





I decided to take the Waterford River Trail back to the downtown.







And then crossed back at Leslie Street, at the edge of the Downtown West End.



Lots of factories in this part of town.





The train station for a city that no longer has trains.





Now as the westernmost tower, Fortis Place makes a beautiful entrance to the Downtown West End.







So much going up in this part of town, which is very car-centric and not really... consciously... part of the downtown in the minds of locals.



Finally, back to my soul.



I stopped at Rocket Bakery for breakfast - an egg and spinach burrito.











And that gave me the energy I needed to walk home via McBride's Hill and Long's Hill.





Hope ye enjoyed the jaunt.
__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #38  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2014, 4:45 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
So, tonight jeddy1989 and I were among the 700 guests to attend the premiere of season 6, the final season, of Republic of Doyle.

If you haven't seen it, it's a detective dramedy set in St. John's:

Video Link


It was AMAZING. So many celebrities in attendance, and not just in the television industry but also theatre, music, and more. I felt like a school girl.

During his speech, Premier Paul Davis - as well as several others, including Allan Hawco and representatives of CBC - noted some amazing facts about the show:

- It averages approximately 1 million viewers per episode in Canada.
- The show is now aired in 97 countries. It has had a tremendous impact on international tourism to St. John's.
- It created 1,400 jobs in Newfoundland and Labrador.
- Labour costs alone were 80 million invested in the St. John's region.
- When it first started, 36% of the crew was from away (mostly mainland Canada), and that's been cut down to 4% through training Newfoundlanders and Labradorians.
- Every season, they have one of these premieres before the episode is broadcast, one year it was a month before, and ask people not to share any spoilers. No one does. CBC execs in Toronto couldn't believe it.
- The show is the first in history to receive the blessing of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, to use its logo, titles, etc. All other shows set here had to use the fake NLP (Newfoundland and Labrador Police).
- In several countries, the RNC now has significant name recognition and the force is receiving great feedback.

And now, a few pics of the event:

Hawco posing with fans:



With the Premier and First Lady of Newfoundland and Labrador:



Oh, ye St. John's girls...









We chatted with one girl jeddy1989 was acquainted with.

"Have ya seen on Facebook I'm getting married?

...

Yes, b'y, sure I'm getting married in Cuba the winter.

...

To a Cuban.

...

B'y, I can't wait!"

I want her life.



More than 700 people were invited.







Hawco signed an edition of our magazine with him on the cover, and posed for a picture with jeddy1989 and I.







And then we got to sit down to watch the premiere episode of the final season, and some great news:

CBC is turning Caught, an award-winning Newfoundland book about a drug dealer, into an eight-part mini-series. Hawco's production company will make it, he's going to star in it. And this is just one of MANY, MANY, MANY projects they have in the works with eOne, which will be aired on CBC.

We're taking over the TV, b'ys, just like we took over the radio.

As Premier Davis put it: OH YEAH!

__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #39  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2014, 4:46 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
October 11, 2014

It's well and truly autumn now. The leaves in the city are changing almost fast enough to watch, and the landscape in the suburbs is back to its familiar red hue - which it will keep until next spring.

Video Link


I started in Shea Heights, looking down on the downtown. Some new infill beside Victoria Park.



The Barenaked Ladies once joked, "St. John's is a beautiful city. It'll be ever better when it's finished." Fortis Place, the Convention Centre expansion, JAG hotel, 351, and others.



St. Patrick's Church, still the third-tallest building in St. John's. Brine and Hamilton Condos (former factory) on the right.



A closer view at Brine and Hamilton Condos. They'll be the first in the city with proper rooftop gardens for each unit.



She's a fair old lady.



Out in the 'burbs, b'ys.





















Back in the West End of St. John's.



You really can see Signal Hill from just about everywhere. It's actually a 9 km drive from that church.





Lots of people enjoying Bowring Park today.



__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #40  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2014, 4:46 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 23,496
So, today my hike was to the top of Cuckold's Cove, which is in between St. John's and Quidi Vidi, basically across Cuckold's Cove from the backside of Signal Hill. A few scenes from there and the parking garage of 351 Water Street.

Video Link


I love, love, love autumn. The blueberry shrubs turn red, the moss turns yellow, and with the patches of green that still remain, it's just delicious.



A view across Cuckold's Cove to Cabot Tower and Signal Hill.



The Quidi Vidi Battery, which is an actual battery and not just a neighbourhood names after one long gone, as in the Battery proper.



The little fishing village of Quidi Vidi, just a 10-minute walk over the hill from downtown St. John's.



Pleasantville (formerly an American base, and massive. It's been divided up and gradually sold off and shut down since Canada took control. The city has a master plan to develop the entire neighbourhood with different styles of housing that achieve the same population density as downtown (up to 6,000 ppl/km2).



A waterfall with some weird... thing... on it. My family's ancestral home in Quidi Vidi, I practically grew up out there visiting relatives, and I have never, ever noticed that waterfall before.



Fishing rooms in Quidi Vidi.



The political pundits here are getting a kick out of Confederation Building still being wrapped in a giant condom.



Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador. 19,000 students and rising.



Cuckhold's Cove.



The St. John's Convention Centre expansion.



The Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador and various other buildings in the downtown.



Water Street West.



Harbour Drive and the harbour apron.



Our harbourside kiosks - Legros & Motti, Jack Astor's, and The Keg.



Old St. John's.



Working on the roof of the St. John's Convention Centre.



The stairs up into the residential Old Town from Mile One Centre.



Another shot of the convention centre expansion.



Fortis Place and the JAG Hotel.



The City of St. John's flag.

__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Atlantic Provinces > St. John's
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:54 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.