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  #21  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2014, 12:11 AM
isaidso isaidso is offline
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Originally Posted by kool maudit View Post
if scotia plaza was near aura and commerce court west was near yonge and bloor, you'd have something like chicago, where the skyline has three peaks anchored by sears, aon and john hancock.
AURA is a good case in point. It instantly made the skyline look bigger due to its placement. The eye instinctually travels to it and, by extension, we started thinking of the skyline as more than the CBD despite not much existing between the CBD and AURA.

If AURA had been built in the CBD, the skyline wouldn't have gone up as many notches as it did. European skylines (La Defense excluded) appear far larger than they are because their skyscrapers are scattered all over the place. Frankfurt?
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  #22  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2014, 2:18 AM
scrapin scrapin is offline
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As others have said in this thread despite ridicule from some people, i think i bring up a good point, u have all those skyscrapers in one little area, if they were more spread out like the majority of cities i think downtown toronto would look a lot bigger. If somebody could make an illustration out of this it would be very cool and much appreciated!
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  #23  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2014, 2:30 AM
Beedok Beedok is offline
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Giving buildings room to breath really helps a skyline look bigger.
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  #24  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2014, 3:00 AM
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Maybe today Toronto could look like Chicago, with multiple dense nodes of towers, but pre-condo boom I think it would look more like Montreal if spread out. A handful of tall towers with gaps in between.
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  #25  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2014, 3:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Trans Canada View Post
Maybe today Toronto could look like Chicago, with multiple dense nodes of towers, but pre-condo boom I think it would look more like Montreal if spread out. A handful of tall towers with gaps in between.
You say that like it's a bad thing.
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  #26  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2014, 5:58 AM
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The tallest tower in Melbourne is the same as FCP and it's downtown is quite dense but the skyline is far more impressive. You can actually see the buildings and the space between them gives a more organic feel to the skyline growth unlike Toronto's volcano.

Toronto has seen a huge number of skyscrapers go up recently but due to the monotony of the design and especially 95% of them be standard blue-glass, it looks more like a blob than a skyline.
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  #27  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2015, 1:09 AM
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I'm from Vancouver, and proud to say Toronto is our top dog.

If I were to "criticize" Toronto for anything, it might be that the city has a 'hard' look to it.

(just how to soften that up is a toughie, though, I will admit)
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  #28  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2015, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
How would I look if I wasn't so dense?
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  #29  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2015, 10:33 PM
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Originally Posted by trofirhen View Post
I'm from Vancouver, and proud to say Toronto is our top dog.

If I were to "criticize" Toronto for anything, it might be that the city has a 'hard' look to it.

(just how to soften that up is a toughie, though, I will admit)
Some trees along major streets and boulevards would help, but can't do much in the winter though. With that said, Toronto is awesome as it is.
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  #30  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2015, 4:04 PM
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Without increasing the density, they would have demolished the historic buildings that existed before, buildings with actual architectual merit and that actually contribute to the vibrancy of Toronto's downtown core. If not for densification, the Financial District wouldn't be the cold, sterile environment littered with the corpses of dead migrating birds that it is today.
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  #31  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2016, 5:40 AM
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How would Toronto look like if the Financial District wasn't as dense?

It would look more spread out.
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  #32  
Old Posted Jun 26, 2016, 7:07 PM
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With One Bloor topped out, now the Toronto skyline has three spread out peaks (like Chicago) and the financial district doesn't completely steal the show the way it used to. The CN Tower of course, still dominates all.
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  #33  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2016, 6:08 PM
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It would look like North York City Centre. Look at NYCC from almost Don Mills just north of Sheppard. The skyline looks HUGE but it's not deep at all. At night time it's pretty impressive, especially when going down the 401 either direction or coming west from Don Mills on Sheppard. During the day time, you can sort of tell the entire cluster is 1-4 buildings deep and it is less impressive.

Sort of like the old Dubai skyline on Sheikh Zayed road before they built the Palm and spread the skyline out like crazy. Or like the Manilla skyline. Or like the Jarkata skyline.
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  #34  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2016, 8:08 PM
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When ever I visit Toronto I head straight for the financial district. I love love walking down Bay St. from old city hall. Such heft and you can really tell where the center of Canadian business really is. Being from little Fredericton is is probably way more amazing then if you were from Montreal or Vancouver.
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  #35  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 8:50 PM
figaro figaro is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scrapin View Post
As others have said in this thread despite ridicule from some people, i think i bring up a good point, u have all those skyscrapers in one little area, if they were more spread out like the majority of cities i think downtown toronto would look a lot bigger. If somebody could make an illustration out of this it would be very cool and much appreciated!
Yes, you had a good point and I observed it too.

All the tallest towers of Toronto are in the CBD, bound by Yonge/University/Front/Queen, which is a small part of downtown. East of Yonge the height rapidly decreases from 200m+ to under 50M+ with no transition. Many of the builders due to crowding together can't even been seen.

For example if some of the buildings were moved from the CBD to say, Queen/John, Church/Dundas, King/Jarvis and College/Spadina, the CBD would essentially look the same, but the skyline/downtown looks as if it were twice as large, because you have new anchor buildings to look at.

But the current arrangement makes practical sense as all the buildings are close to each other, even linked by underground path. Although it looks not as impressive.

Also toronto's highrises (north of CBD) are too much hinged on Yonge st. The east side is essentially flat (which may be already changing).
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  #36  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 8:52 PM
figaro figaro is offline
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Originally Posted by Epi View Post
It would look like North York City Centre. Look at NYCC from almost Don Mills just north of Sheppard. The skyline looks HUGE but it's not deep at all. At night time it's pretty impressive, especially when going down the 401 either direction or coming west from Don Mills on Sheppard. During the day time, you can sort of tell the entire cluster is 1-4 buildings deep and it is less impressive.

Sort of like the old Dubai skyline on Sheikh Zayed road before they built the Palm and spread the skyline out like crazy. Or like the Manilla skyline. Or like the Jarkata skyline.
good observation.

NYCC looks impressive from afar, but closer, it is still largely suburban like. 50 meters from a 150m building, you are in the middle of 2 story homes. Same for Yonge/Eglinton.
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