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  #21  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2015, 9:18 PM
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I actually think those pictures prove times square isn't all that crowded.
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  #22  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2015, 9:20 PM
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What are the chances that, 15-20 years out, the Broadway pedestrian plaza ends up extending the full 25 blocks all the way from Columbus Circle to Herald Square?

Seems so natural that it's almost inevitable: a grand tourist route from the corner of Central Park through Times Square down to the ESB and Penn Station.
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  #23  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2015, 11:05 PM
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bubba gumps or porno theaters?? *raises hands to weigh the consideration*.....
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  #24  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2015, 11:09 PM
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the real question, why is there a TGIF Fridays on Fifth avenue just south of Rockefeller center?
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  #25  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2015, 11:19 PM
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seems like if anything, new yorkers would want to consolidate all the corny big box tourist stuff in one location. how much does the coming and going of daily life in times sq. really affect the average new yorker, probably not much....
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  #26  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2015, 3:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays View Post
Seattle's Pike Place Market has similar issues. The crowds are obviously smaller but they're in hallways, narrow alleys, and even narrower sidewalks, and the logjam of people can take forever to walk through.

If you live in an area like that you can develop crowd-walking skills, allowing you to weave through far more quickly. But tourists generally haven't. And many locals haven't. On my visits, I think I'm the fastest pedestrian in Manhattan.
It becomes like driving.
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  #27  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2015, 3:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Larry King View Post
Ya midtown manhattan sucks. Tons of chains, drug stores, overpriced crap and tourists... yuck.
More money probably flows through Midtown Manhattan on any given day than the total sum Philadelphia has seen in the last century.

It's certainly not a place I care to live, but Midtown Manhattan is the richest and most important district in the world.
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  #28  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2015, 5:43 PM
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I think most US cities would kill to have this problem at their cores. Bustling crowded streets with great streetlife and tons of tourists? Seems like NYC has that 'embarrassment of riches' thing down pat.

If the tourists are so much of a problem for business, why can't they just phase out the local traditional stuff in favor of more tourist-friendly stuff? Maybe transition office to hotel or more mixed use?

What can they do within the existing infrastructure to help with the congestion. I saw that more trains was mentioned..anything else?

*I have not been in Times Square in nearly 25 years...it certainly seems to have changed! lol.
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  #29  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2015, 6:46 PM
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^^^^

Its not a problem though that's crippling to the city. This is just white people complaining. Believe me, the city, while crowded, is functional on both the pedestrian and vehicle level. One of the biggest challenges, and it will be needed eventually is a massive overhaul on the transit system. But to say that foot traffic is inconveniencing business to the point of it slowing down is false. If anything, its a very minor inconvenience and business has been going on as it has been for the last hundred years in a very packed Manhattan.

Like Mhays said, develop walking skills. Even during the 5pm rush hour, a walk from 42nd to 33rd along 6th Avenue is not a problem. On the topic of places to eat, people need to be smart. The side street cafe's or restaurants usually have room. If one decides to eat at TGI fridays, yeah, expect crowds. If I could do it, other can as well.
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  #30  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2015, 4:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
I think every city should aspire to have at least one or two really busy and vibrant areas like this. Is there anywhere else in NA that comes anywhere near the foot traffic level? I can't think of any. Maybe somewhere in Mex.C?
The magnificent mile in Chicago has some pretty decent foot traffic. Maybe not to the level of Times Square, but enough to make one feel like they're in a very large, very important place that draws people in from all over.
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  #31  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2015, 5:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
I think every city should aspire to have at least one or two really busy and vibrant areas like this. Is there anywhere else in NA that comes anywhere near the foot traffic level? I can't think of any. Maybe somewhere in Mex.C?
Boston's Downtown Crossing supposedly sees 250,000 visitors per day, but it just doesn't feel that crowded usually, even with the narrow streets.
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  #32  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2015, 4:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
I think every city should aspire to have at least one or two really busy and vibrant areas like this. Is there anywhere else in NA that comes anywhere near the foot traffic level? I can't think of any. Maybe somewhere in Mex.C?
For the west coast, I'd go on a limb and say that Union Square in downtown San Francisco (and the surrounding area) is probably the only place west of the Mississippi that can hold a candle to the foot traffic this area of Manhattan has. Particularly Powell Street running along Union Square down to Market is virtually jam packed every day.
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  #33  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2015, 6:13 PM
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Crowded Street:

* Notice how people dressed respectably. The good old days.


Credit: FMTForever

Typical Weekend or Weekday with Nice weather:




Credit: http://www.panoramio.com/photo/56235524

Although besides this area, Herald Square, and the 6th and 33rd by MSG are really busy areas as well. Central Park South by the apple store is a madhouse most of the time.
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  #34  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2015, 7:40 PM
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yeah, people really did know how to dress back then.
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  #35  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2015, 8:39 PM
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Originally Posted by dc_denizen View Post
the real question, why is there a TGIF Fridays on Fifth avenue just south of Rockefeller center?
Time, of course, marches on, but I thought the following quote (too long, I'm sorry) from Wikipedia regarding TGIF history was worth posting. It was the first singles bar back in the day:

Alan Stillman opened the first T.G.I. Friday's restaurant in 1965 in New York. He lived in a neighborhood with many airline stewardesses, fashion models, secretaries, and other young, single people on the East Side of Manhattan near the Queensboro Bridge, and hoped that opening a bar would help him meet women. At the time, Stillman's choices for socializing were non-public cocktail parties or "guys' beer-drinking hangout" bars that women usually did not visit; he recalled that "there was no public place for people between, say, twenty-three to thirty-seven years old, to meet." He sought to recreate the comfortable cocktail-party atmosphere in public despite having no experience in the restaurant business.[4][5]

With $5,000 of his own money and $5,000 borrowed from his mother,[4] Stillman purchased a bar he often visited, The Good Tavern at the corner of 63rd Street and First Avenue, and renamed it T.G.I. Friday's after the expression "Thank God! It's Friday!" from his years at Bucknell University.[6][7] The new restaurant, which opened on March 15, 1965, served standard American cuisine, bar food, and alcoholic beverages,[5] but emphasized food quality and preparation.[6] The exterior featured a red-and-white striped awning and blue paint, the Gay Nineties interior included fake Tiffany lamps,[5] wooden floors, Bentwood chairs, and striped tablecloths, and the bar area added brass rails and stained glass. The employees were young and wore red-and-white striped soccer shirts,[6] and every time someone had a birthday, the entire restaurant crew came around with a cake and sang Friday's traditional birthday song. The first location closed in 1994[4] and is now a British pub called "Baker Street"; the brass rails are still there.

Although Malachy McCourt's nearby eponymous bar preceded T.G.I. Friday's[8] and Stillman credited the media for creating the term, he had unintentionally created one of the first singles bars. It benefited from the near-simultaneous availability of the birth-control pill and Betty Friedan's book The Feminine Mystique:[6][4][5]

I don’t think there was anything else like it at the time. Before T.G.I. Friday’s, four single twenty-five year-old girls were not going out on Friday nights, in public and with each other, to have a good time. They went to people’s apartments for cocktail parties or they might go to a real restaurant for a date or for somebody’s birthday, but they weren’t going out with each other to a bar for a casual dinner and drinks because there was no such place for them to go.[5]

T.G.I. Friday's was one of the first to use promotions such as ladies' night,[6] and Stillman achieved his hopes of meeting women; "Have you seen the movie Cocktail? Tom Cruise played me!...Why do girls want to date the bartender? To this day, I’m not sure that I get it."[5] He and the restaurant benefited from its location—according to Stillman, 480 stewardesses lived in the apartment building next door[4]—and received publicity in national magazines. T.G.I. Friday's became so popular that it had to install ropes to create an area for those waiting in line, also unusual at the time for a restaurant. A competitor, Maxwell's Plum, opened across the street, and others soon followed.[5]
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  #36  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2015, 9:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scalziand View Post
Boston's Downtown Crossing supposedly sees 250,000 visitors per day, but it just doesn't feel that crowded usually, even with the narrow streets.
Maybe people are more likely to pass through without lingering making it less full at any given time than a site full of tourists hanging out and taking it all in.
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  #37  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2015, 9:27 PM
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Originally Posted by destroycreate View Post
For the west coast, I'd go on a limb and say that Union Square in downtown San Francisco (and the surrounding area) is probably the only place west of the Mississippi that can hold a candle to the foot traffic this area of Manhattan has. Particularly Powell Street running along Union Square down to Market is virtually jam packed every day.
Las Vegas Strip?
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  #38  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2015, 9:30 PM
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^^^^

Vegas strip is very busy. Traffic is incredible, but LV also has a unique way of dealing with it. The whole systems of traffic lights, signals, ability to shut down certain areas or navigate for emergency vehicles is optimized. I guess we could call it a smart grid, but it works dealing with the volume. The best thing they did was build the escalators for the major crossings. Reduced a lot of pedestrian injuries/deaths due to cars.

Vegas has something like 40 million visitors in 2014. On a Friday night, or even Saturday which tends to be the busiest, its like Times Square in the sense of raw pedestrians/cars out.

While NYC has made improvements to its traffic light system, the sheer volume of cars. buses, people. and so on strains it. All it takes is that one bus or truck to block the box, and it cascades for miles. Gridlock is usually caused by that, hence the large fines and points for blocking the box. Some cities can get away with having the box blocked, but in NYC, it causes a shit storm in terms of the traffic getting progressively worse.
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  #39  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2015, 1:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austlar1 View Post
Time, of course, marches on, but I thought the following quote (too long, I'm sorry) from Wikipedia regarding TGIF history was worth posting. It was the first singles bar back in the day:

Alan Stillman opened the first T.G.I. Friday's restaurant in 1965 in New York. He lived in a neighborhood with many airline stewardesses, fashion models, secretaries, and other young, single people on the East Side of Manhattan near the Queensboro Bridge, and hoped that opening a bar would help him meet women. At the time, Stillman's choices for socializing were non-public cocktail parties or "guys' beer-drinking hangout" bars that women usually did not visit; he recalled that "there was no public place for people between, say, twenty-three to thirty-seven years old, to meet." He sought to recreate the comfortable cocktail-party atmosphere in public despite having no experience in the restaurant business.[4][5]

With $5,000 of his own money and $5,000 borrowed from his mother,[4] Stillman purchased a bar he often visited, The Good Tavern at the corner of 63rd Street and First Avenue, and renamed it T.G.I. Friday's after the expression "Thank God! It's Friday!" from his years at Bucknell University.[6][7] The new restaurant, which opened on March 15, 1965, served standard American cuisine, bar food, and alcoholic beverages,[5] but emphasized food quality and preparation.[6] The exterior featured a red-and-white striped awning and blue paint, the Gay Nineties interior included fake Tiffany lamps,[5] wooden floors, Bentwood chairs, and striped tablecloths, and the bar area added brass rails and stained glass. The employees were young and wore red-and-white striped soccer shirts,[6] and every time someone had a birthday, the entire restaurant crew came around with a cake and sang Friday's traditional birthday song. The first location closed in 1994[4] and is now a British pub called "Baker Street"; the brass rails are still there.

Although Malachy McCourt's nearby eponymous bar preceded T.G.I. Friday's[8] and Stillman credited the media for creating the term, he had unintentionally created one of the first singles bars. It benefited from the near-simultaneous availability of the birth-control pill and Betty Friedan's book The Feminine Mystique:[6][4][5]

I don’t think there was anything else like it at the time. Before T.G.I. Friday’s, four single twenty-five year-old girls were not going out on Friday nights, in public and with each other, to have a good time. They went to people’s apartments for cocktail parties or they might go to a real restaurant for a date or for somebody’s birthday, but they weren’t going out with each other to a bar for a casual dinner and drinks because there was no such place for them to go.[5]

T.G.I. Friday's was one of the first to use promotions such as ladies' night,[6] and Stillman achieved his hopes of meeting women; "Have you seen the movie Cocktail? Tom Cruise played me!...Why do girls want to date the bartender? To this day, I’m not sure that I get it."[5] He and the restaurant benefited from its location—according to Stillman, 480 stewardesses lived in the apartment building next door[4]—and received publicity in national magazines. T.G.I. Friday's became so popular that it had to install ropes to create an area for those waiting in line, also unusual at the time for a restaurant. A competitor, Maxwell's Plum, opened across the street, and others soon followed.[5]
Interesting, thanks!

Maybe I will stop into the 5th avenue branch...
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  #40  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2015, 1:51 AM
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thats a much more interesting history of tgi fridays than i would have expected!
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