HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #61  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2016, 8:16 AM
nito nito is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2,378
A treemap depicting population growth in the year to mid-2015 for London and New York Boroughs (Source: ONS and USCB).

__________________
London Transport Thread updated: 17/07/17
London Stadium & Arena Thread updated: 16/11/07
London General Update Thread updated: 16/01/04
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #62  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2016, 7:28 PM
muppet's Avatar
muppet muppet is offline
if I sang out of tune
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: London
Posts: 4,279
Interesting article - New Geography compares London and NYC (2014 figures)

http://www.newgeography.com/content/...n-and-new-york

Basically both cities have different layouts (London has high density neighbourhoods interspersed with protected land that creates a vast urban-rural fabric for its exburbs, while NYC has low density sprawl for its suburbs and large empty tracts for its exurbs - but both cities function very similarly in size, layout, commuting and function).

Last edited by muppet; Jul 26, 2016 at 11:13 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #63  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2016, 12:56 PM
MolsonExport's Avatar
MolsonExport MolsonExport is offline
The Vomit Bag.
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: The Tropic of Sir Galahad
Posts: 28,877
this thread has unfortunately become very versus-y
__________________
The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness. John Kenneth Galbraith
We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Sometimes we must interfere.Elie Wiesel
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #64  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2017, 6:18 PM
yuriandrade's Avatar
yuriandrade yuriandrade is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 381
Bringing up the thread:

Macrometropolis São Paulo (33 million inh., 10% growth/decade):




Travelling 228 km through (dense) urban areas only:








---------------------------------------------------


Population 2016:

City: 12.038.175 (5.8%)
Metro: 21.242.939 (10.3%)
Macro: 32.559.101 (15.8%)
State: 44.749.699 (21.7%)
Brazil: 206.081.432


GDP 2014:

City: US$ 267.261.651.915 (10.9%)
Metro: US$ 435.262.350.213 (17.7%)
Macro: US$ 643.222.874.469 (26.2%)
State: US$ 790.721.725.532 (32.2%)
Brazil: US$ 2.459.128.842.553

São Paulo state population has grown faster than Brazil between every single Census since 1872, but between 2000-2010 (11.4% x 12.3%)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #65  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2017, 7:15 PM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, TAAR1
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Jersey - Somerset County
Posts: 18,315
^^^^

Whats the area for that mega region? Going to approximate and say 62500 km2. 250 km across or so.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #66  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2017, 8:11 PM
yuriandrade's Avatar
yuriandrade yuriandrade is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 381
Chris, the way I defined it, it's 47,562 km² for those 32,559,101 inh. as 2016. It's growing at a 300,000 people/year rate.

Obviously, we can get rid of huge swaths of empty land keeping the total population intact.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #67  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2017, 8:49 PM
GreaterMontréal's Avatar
GreaterMontréal GreaterMontréal is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 3,086
cities should aim for the highest standard of living and quality of life, rather than aim to be the biggest cities on earth.
__________________
Montréal métropolitain
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #68  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2017, 9:21 PM
yuriandrade's Avatar
yuriandrade yuriandrade is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 381
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreaterMontréal View Post
cities should aim for the highest standard of living and quality of life, rather than aim to be the biggest cities on earth.
I don't think cities "aim to be the biggest". One just need to be. Tokyo is the one, and it has a very high standard of living.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #69  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2017, 10:48 AM
yuriandrade's Avatar
yuriandrade yuriandrade is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 381
NASA has updated its night map, and it's way better than the previous one. Now you can distinguish urban areas from suburban, for instance. Some shots from the areas we are discussing in this thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by streetscapeer View Post
Tokyo


Pearl River Delta


London/Paris


Bos-Wash Corridor
Quote:
Originally Posted by GersonLDN View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by GersonLDN View Post
SUDESTE:
Quote:
Originally Posted by GersonLDN View Post
MEXICO:
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #70  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2017, 11:17 AM
montréaliste montréaliste is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Montréal, évidemment!
Posts: 1,110
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreaterMontréal View Post
cities should aim for the highest standard of living and quality of life, rather than aim to be the biggest cities on earth.
We have potholes that can swallow up whole cars. That is what we should aim for.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #71  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2017, 4:12 PM
isaidso isaidso is offline
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 7,581
Southern Ontario

That's Ottawa in the upper right and Detroit in the lower left.


Courtesy of NASA
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams

Last edited by isaidso; Apr 15, 2017 at 6:57 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #72  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2017, 6:57 PM
isaidso isaidso is offline
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 7,581
The region in and around Toronto is one of the fastest growing in the western world. The various satellite cities are being stitched together through a massive 10 year investment in regional rail. When complete it will ensure all day frequent service throughout the region and help integrate its parts. Today only Greater Toronto Hamilton could be considered integrated as one metropolitan area but even that looks destined to hit 10 million people within 24 years.

Greater Toronto Hamilton does not include St.Catharines-Niagara (411,700), Brantford (145,500), Guelph (156,000), Kitchener-Waterloo (517,300), Peterborough (124,100), or Barrie (205,000). Greater Toronto Hamilton had a population of roughly 7,414,700 last year implying a population of 9,914,700 by 2041.

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tabl...emo05a-eng.htm


About 3.5 million people will move into the Greater Toronto and Hamilton area by 2041, mostly into areas not yet developed (purple) which will grow more densely than in the past; and in some existing developed areas where densities will significantly increase (gold).

Courtesy of the Toronto Star
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams

Last edited by isaidso; Apr 15, 2017 at 7:13 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #73  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2017, 7:01 PM
niwell's Avatar
niwell niwell is offline
you go on ahead
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Parkdale, Toronto
Posts: 7,246
You can really tell how much more Detroit sprawls compared to Toronto and the rest of the Greater Golden Horseshoe.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #74  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2017, 7:10 PM
yuriandrade's Avatar
yuriandrade yuriandrade is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 381
And looking to this pic, it seems Detroit is quite close to capture Lansing and Jackson into its CSA, making them to break the 6 million barrier.

As the population, and specially employment, are growing once again in the region, it will probably happen.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #75  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2017, 12:04 AM
Crawford Crawford is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 13,443
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuriandrade View Post
And looking to this pic, it seems Detroit is quite close to capture Lansing and Jackson into its CSA, making them to break the 6 million barrier.

As the population, and specially employment, are growing once again in the region, it will probably happen.
I'm not sure I would use lights from satellite images to make inferences re. CSAs.

And Metro Detroit is pretty affordable, so supercommuting doesn't make much sense. There are probably few people who would be willing to commute from Lansing to Detroit.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #76  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2017, 12:19 AM
yuriandrade's Avatar
yuriandrade yuriandrade is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 381
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I'm not sure I would use lights from satellite images to make inferences re. CSAs.
If their urban ereas become one they're automatically placed under the same MSA/CSA, if I remember correctly. In any case, if the urban spots are getting closer, we can safely assume it's easier to commute between them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
And Metro Detroit is pretty affordable, so supercommuting doesn't make much sense. There are probably few people who would be willing to commute from Lansing to Detroit.
It seems Lansing labour market is very solid indeed, not making commute necessary. However, Jackson could be attracted into the Detroit CSA, specially if Detroit MSA and Ann Arbor MSA to merge.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #77  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 12:38 AM
isaidso isaidso is offline
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 7,581
Shouldn't Windsor be included as part of the Detroit metro? Lots of people who live in Windsor go to Detroit for work, entertainment, etc.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #78  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 12:51 AM
BIMBAM's Avatar
BIMBAM BIMBAM is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 509
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Shouldn't Windsor be included as part of the Detroit metro? Lots of people who live in Windsor go to Detroit for work, entertainment, etc.
Well, not that many go for work because of the expensive tolls and not having the right to work there. Certainly some do, but I doubt it'd be a large enough percentage for it to qualify as a suburb. Travelling for entertainment doesn't usually factor into these types of calculations, and being in another country would also rule it out. Unofficially though? I tend to think of it as at least somewhat part of Metro Detroit, border be damned.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #79  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 1:46 AM
isaidso isaidso is offline
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 7,581
It would interesting to see what the actual commuting numbers are. Culturally it's certainly an extension of Detroit.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #80  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 1:51 PM
north 42's Avatar
north 42 north 42 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Windsor, Ontario
Posts: 4,048
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
It would interesting to see what the actual commuting numbers are. Culturally it's certainly an extension of Detroit.
I think I read that the number of Windsorites commuting to Detroit is around 7500. There are also Detroiter's that commute to Windsor, but the numbers are much smaller.

Windsor is definately not a suburb of Detroit, it is its own core city, and also has its own culture distinct from Detroit. There is a lot of culture sharing going both ways across the border though, but the two cities look and feel quite different. All said, the area does somewhat function and feel like one region, the Greater Detroit/Windsor region.
__________________
Windsor Ontario, Canada's southern most city!
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:45 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.