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  #21  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2016, 1:31 PM
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Williamsburg, Brooklyn still has a hugely visible Hasidic population. Roughly 1 in 8 New Yorkers are Jewish.
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  #22  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2016, 6:51 PM
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Most Jews in Philly area live in various Montgomery County communities, but also Lower Bucks, the city proper, and NJ. Nothing like NYC where you have entire neighborhoods/towns that are almost entirely Jewish but I would count the following areas as "heavily to moderately Jewish."

Philadelphia
Rittenhouse Square (wealthy)
Mt Airy (crunchy)
Northeast (Russian/Israeli immigrants and Orthodox Jews)

Suburbs
Lower Merion (wealthy secular and Orthodox)
Lafayette Hill
Dresher
Elkins Park/Melrose Park
Huntington Valley
Lower Bucks County (mostly Jews who left the Northeast)
Cherry Hill, NJ

NJ Shore Towns
Margate
Ventnor
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  #23  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2016, 8:35 PM
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Originally Posted by dave8721 View Post
South Florida (estimated Jewish population
Some other interesting facts...
http://jpupdates.com/2014/10/20/stud...orthodox-jews/

Miami-Dade: 123,000
Broward: 186,500
Palm Beach: 256,000
"Together, the three counties’ 550,000 or so Jews make up the third-largest Jewish metro area in the nation, behind New York and Los Angeles."

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According to the study, Miami has a higher proportion of foreign-born Jewish adults than any other American Jewish community (33); 51% of all of Miami’s 2.6 million residents are foreign-born. Researchers also found a 57% increase over the last decade in Hispanic Jewish adults in Miami.

Of Miami’s foreign-born Jews, the largest group by far is Israelis. Some 5,180 Miami Jews were born in Israel, and approximately 9,000 adults consider themselves Israeli. Some 3,700 Miami Jews were born in Cuba; 2,854 in Argentina; 2,643 in Venezuela; 2,537 in Colombia; and 2,220 in Canada.
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While the 2013 Pew Research Center Survey of U.S. Jews found that just 46 percent of American Jews said that “being Jewish is very important” to them, 74 percent of respondents to the 2014 Greater Miami Jewish Federation Population Study reported feeling this way. Only 16 percent of couples in the Jewish community are intermarried. The 16 percent has not changed since 2004. It is one of the lowest intermarriage rates of all American Jewish communities, and compares with the 61 percent figure in the Pew Study.
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  #24  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2016, 8:48 PM
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here the top 10 US metro areas by number of Jews. the first number indicates global rank.

2. NYC - 2,028,200
5. LA - 662,450
6. miami - 535,000
8. chicago - 291,800
9. philly - 285,950
11. DC/balt. - 276,445
12. boston - 261,100
13. bay area - 228,00
16. atlanta - 199,000
19. san diego - 89,000

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish...by_urban_areas
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  #25  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2016, 9:07 PM
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Edmonton doesn't really have much of a Jewish population, so it has more of a Jewish block than a Jewish neighbourhood, which is basically Jasper Ave from 119 to 120 Street. It's where one of our main synagogues as well as Jewish seniors apartments are located.
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  #26  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2016, 10:01 PM
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  #27  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 12:29 PM
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Pittsburgh has Squirrel Hill within city limits, which has remained around 40% Jewish since the mid 20th century, with roughly equal levels of orthodox and secular. I have heard that Pittsburgh has the largest urban Jewish community (within the core city) next to NYC.

There used to be a much larger secular Jewish community in many other Pittsburgh neighborhoods which has since dispersed. AFAIK there is no particular "Jewish suburb" in the Pittsburgh area, with the suburban Jewish population just evenly distributed through upper-middle class areas.
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  #28  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
There used to be a much larger secular Jewish community in many other Pittsburgh neighborhoods which has since dispersed.
My sense is that the secular Jewish suburb, the stereotypical Jewish experience in modern-day America, is kind of disintegrating. The U.S. Jewish community is getting much more Orthodox, while Conservative and especially Reform Jews have a high degree of intermarriage, and people no longer feel obligated to live in specific neighborhood typology.

The old "rules" around WASP, Catholic, and Jewish suburbs (at least in the older parts of the U.S.) have weakened considerably. People group more around income and lifestyle than by religion and ethnicity.

Of course, this doesn't mean that Jewish neighborhoods are disappearing. Jewish religious neighborhoods are booming. But the postwar secular-type suburb seems to be dying out. The Jewish community overall is becoming much more religious, and there will probably be a shift in the typical Jewish experience in the U.S.
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  #29  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 1:21 PM
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Pittsburgh has Squirrel Hill within city limits, which has remained around 40% Jewish since the mid 20th century, with roughly equal levels of orthodox and secular. I have heard that Pittsburgh has the largest urban Jewish community (within the core city) next to NYC.

There used to be a much larger secular Jewish community in many other Pittsburgh neighborhoods which has since dispersed. AFAIK there is no particular "Jewish suburb" in the Pittsburgh area, with the suburban Jewish population just evenly distributed through upper-middle class areas.
Squirrel Hill has, I believe, been Pittsburgh's main Jewish area since the 1920s. It's interesting that it held out for so long.
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  #30  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 1:51 PM
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My city of Gatineau, Quebec does not have a Jewish community to speak of.

The city of Ottawa, Ontario across the river does have a decently-sized one. About 15,000 people out of a total population of 900,000.

To my knowledge Jews in Ottawa were never concentrated in a single area, although there is or was a synagogue on King Edward Ave. on the fringes of the city's downtown. I've never know this area to be especially Jewish.

These days Jewish Ottawans are quite spread out although it seems there is a small concentration in the inner suburb of Nepean to the west of Ottawa. There are synagogues and community centres in that general area.

The Jewish community of Montreal is the 2nd largest in Canada and has about 120,000 members. It was traditionally concentrated in inner city neighbourhoods just north of downtown along St-Laurent and St-Urbain. This is the area where author Mordecai Richler (Duddy Kravitz, St. Urbain's Horseman, Solomon Gursky, Barney's Version) grew up. Captain Kirk himself William Shatner also grew up in this part of Montreal. While some Jewish businesses remain in this area most of the Jewish resident population is gone.

Another long-established Jewish area is Côte-des-Neiges, also inner city but to the northwest of downtown. This is an aging Jewish community, although many newcomers from North Africa's and France's Jewish community often settle there as there are many Jewish services in the area.

Jews are actually a strong majority in two western inner city enclaves in Montreal which are Côte-St-Luc and Hampstead. I don't know if it is true but these areas are said to have the largest concentration of Holocaust survivors in the world outside of Israel.

There is another pocket of Jewish population in the tony and otherwise very francophone district of Outremont, to the north of downtown. These are Hassidim (orthodox) Jews and they live pretty much apart from other Montreal Jews - and everyone else. Strangely enough, the Hassidim also have a newer suburban community in the far northern suburb of Boisbriand, which is even more old stock French Canadian than Outremont. They keep to themselves there too.

Even though Montreal is primarily a French-speaking city, most of the Jews in the city (generally Ashkenazis) adopted English as their main language. Even though most can speak French too these days. Over the past couple of decades, though, most newcomers in the Jewish community have been French-speaking, generally Sephardim from North Africa and France.

So now the Jewish community of Montreal is close to one-third French oriented, and two-thirds English oriented. It makes for tensions sometimes because the old community is used to doing everything in English, and the newcomers are demanding services and other stuff in French.
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Last edited by Acajack; Oct 5, 2016 at 2:29 PM.
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  #31  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 1:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
My sense is that the secular Jewish suburb, the stereotypical Jewish experience in modern-day America, is kind of disintegrating. The U.S. Jewish community is getting much more Orthodox, while Conservative and especially Reform Jews have a high degree of intermarriage, and people no longer feel obligated to live in specific neighborhood typology.

The old "rules" around WASP, Catholic, and Jewish suburbs (at least in the older parts of the U.S.) have weakened considerably. People group more around income and lifestyle than by religion and ethnicity.

Of course, this doesn't mean that Jewish neighborhoods are disappearing. Jewish religious neighborhoods are booming. But the postwar secular-type suburb seems to be dying out. The Jewish community overall is becoming much more religious, and there will probably be a shift in the typical Jewish experience in the U.S.
This phenomenon is replicated across other ethnic groups, too. Look at the old Italian, Irish, Asian, and even gay enclaves. As American society becomes more tolerant and immigrant groups assimilate, the need for such communities lessen. Overall, it's a good sign that people don't have the "need" to live within specific communities but then again, it's a little sad to see these groups assimilate (lose their unique identities) and these old ethnic neighborhoods disappear.
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  #32  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 1:59 PM
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Originally Posted by SHiRO View Post
why do the jewish populations seem so low in european cities? my knee-jerk is maybe that people don't identify as jewish as much in europe if they are non-practicing.
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  #33  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 2:04 PM
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Interestingly, Outremont was something like 1/3 Jewish during the interwar years (mixed in with wealthy French Canadians. Pierre Trudeau grew up in Outremont). Although a small independent municipality until 2002 it really is an urban district.

The old Jewish population of Outremont moved onto CSL and Hampstead in the postwar years, but Outremont and the adjacent Mile End because Hasidic enclaves after WWII.

After NYC, Montreal has the largest Hasidic population in North America.

Last edited by Docere; Oct 5, 2016 at 2:18 PM.
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  #34  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 2:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
Squirrel Hill has, I believe, been Pittsburgh's main Jewish area since the 1920s. It's interesting that it held out for so long.
In terms of built structure Squirrel Hill is very much akin to Cleveland's eastern suburbs. It was built out just after the streetcar period, with most of the neighborhood essentially 1920s automotive suburbia with significant denser multifamily mixed in.

Squirrel Hill never went into decline, and never had any white flight. It also maintains the best neighborhood public schools in the city's school district. The neighborhood was pretty much steadily comprised of a mix of Jews, wealthy professionals, and student renters. In the last 15 years the explosion of Asian students at CMU (and Pitt at the grad level) has shifted the neighborhood demographics considerably in the multifamily zones, but otherwise the neighborhood has changed little.
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  #35  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 2:27 PM
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why do the jewish populations seem so low in european cities? my knee-jerk is maybe that people don't identify as jewish as much in europe if they are non-practicing.
The Third Reich??

Europe, especially Eastern Europe, had a gigantic Jewish population before WW2. North Africa/Middle East also had a large Jewish population, before decolonization and the rise of Islamic states.

Those that weren't killed usually ended up in Israel, the U.S., and a few other places.

I actually think those European numbers are fairly high. I had no idea there were still so many Jews in Budapest. How did that community survive? Paris, I knew, because Algerian and North African Jews mostly fled there following decolonization, but those numbers are higher than expected, IMO.

I'm also amazed/slightly suspicious of the Russia/Ukraine numbers. There are really 110,000 Jews in Kiev? There are hundreds of thousands of Ukranian Jews in the U.S. and Israel, all who came in recent decades. How many could be left?
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  #36  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 2:27 PM
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why do the jewish populations seem so low in european cities? my knee-jerk is maybe that people don't identify as jewish as much in europe if they are non-practicing.
More and more are turning ultra religious again here, though. You can see from the way they dress. Like orthodox weirdos. It's pretty strange to see.

And some are fleeing to Israel or to other developed countries (some to Canada as Acajack mentioned) cause they no longer feel safe in this country that's always been theirs.

Heck, even the local Catholic community that has yet been rather relaxed and open-minded for long is somewhat tense these days.

It's all because of the mess of radical Islam - that is the money of Saudi Arabia, Qatar and such to fund their medieval ideology - and the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians that will never end, it seems. Some people, either Jewish or Catholic, feeling threatened are going back to their so called roots, even when it'd be backward and reactionary, in a desperate defensive move.

All of this sucks, looking bad. Indeed, we're not so used to religious attitudes or bigots at all here. The good thing is most are aware of the danger, so we should be able to avoid any serious related trouble, enlightened as we are in that matter.

This is quite a challenge anyway, showing our society must get better.
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  #37  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 2:32 PM
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And some are fleeing to Israel or to other developed countries (some to Canada as Acajack mentioned) cause they no longer feel safe in this country that's always been theirs.

.
Yes, they have their own communications networks and the word among French Jews right now is "get out of France!", and move to Israel, Canada, the U.S., etc.
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  #38  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 2:47 PM
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Interestingly, Outremont was something like 1/3 Jewish during the interwar years (mixed in with wealthy French Canadians. Pierre Trudeau grew up in Outremont). Although a small independent municipality until 2002 it really is an urban district.

The old Jewish population of Outremont moved onto CSL and Hampstead in the postwar years, but Outremont and the adjacent Mile End because Hasidic enclaves after WWII.

After NYC, Montreal has the largest Hasidic population in North America.
I think Outremont is probably still around 15% Jewish today.
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  #39  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 2:52 PM
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I think Outremont is probably still around 15% Jewish today.
Yes, but obviously a completely different Jewish population.
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  #40  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2016, 2:59 PM
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The only European country which has a significantly bigger Jewish population now than in the pre-WWII years is France. The North African immigration outnumbered the Ashkenazi population; I believe about 2/3 of French Jews are Sephardic.

Of course French Jewry is on the decline today - many heading to Israel and to Montreal, London, Miami etc.
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