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  #81  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2016, 5:03 PM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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I think sometimes among the very orthodox communities here in the UK there can be quite a bit of 'hidden' poverty. Sure the houses might be average or above average size but if the family has 6 kids then per person the living space and household incomes can often be quite low. It's similar in Israel from what I've read, with Haredi communities having relatively low proportions of workers and being more reliant on public assistance than others.
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  #82  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2016, 5:32 PM
Flyers2001 Flyers2001 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McBane View Post
Most Jews in Philly area live in various Montgomery County communities, but also Lower Bucks, the city proper, and NJ. Nothing like NYC where you have entire neighborhoods/towns that are almost entirely Jewish but I would count the following areas as "heavily to moderately Jewish."

Philadelphia
Rittenhouse Square (wealthy)
Mt Airy (crunchy)
Northeast (Russian/Israeli immigrants and Orthodox Jews)

Suburbs
Lower Merion (wealthy secular and Orthodox)
Lafayette Hill
Dresher
Elkins Park/Melrose Park
Huntington Valley
Lower Bucks County (mostly Jews who left the Northeast)
Cherry Hill, NJ

NJ Shore Towns
Margate
Ventnor
In the 1980's the Oxford Circle Neighborhood was predominately Jewish, towards the late 80's early 90's they generally progressed northward to the Bustleton/Somerton section of the city. And as the late 90's Early 2000's came around the American Jewish population left for Huntingdon Valley, Newtown and Richboro areas. It was generally replace by Russian Jews.
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  #83  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2016, 7:23 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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Two other Canadian cities: Winnipeg and Vancouver.

Winnipeg has about 15,000 Jews - a decline from its peak of around 20,000 in the mid-20th century. For a Great Plains city, Winnipeg attracted a lot of Jewish immigrants. They started out in the North End (today the poorest part of Winnipeg), initially moved into the northern suburbs in the postwar years but today are mostly in River Heights and Tuxedo in the favored section south of the river. Unlike Montreal and Toronto, Winnipeg was not a major center for postwar Jewish immigration.

Vancouver has about 25,000 - but it's a Western-type community with low levels of affiliation and observance. The community is much more spread out across the metro area as compared to Toronto and Montreal but there is a Jewish concentration on the west side of town, particularly in the Shaughnessy-Oak St. area.
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  #84  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2016, 7:34 PM
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So is New York actually the city with the highest Jewish population in the world?

2 million+ Jews in NY; 400,000 in Tel Aviv, and the total population of Jerusalem is 800,000 (and it's ~60% Jewish).

Edit: Nevermind, it's Tel Aviv (population 3.7 million, not 400,000). NY is still #2, which is pretty impressive.
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  #85  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2016, 8:55 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
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So is New York actually the city with the highest Jewish population in the world?

2 million+ Jews in NY; 400,000 in Tel Aviv, and the total population of Jerusalem is 800,000 (and it's ~60% Jewish).

Edit: Nevermind, it's Tel Aviv (population 3.7 million, not 400,000). NY is still #2, which is pretty impressive.
Probably the city, yes, but metro, no. Tel Aviv probably has more.

Keep in mind, though that the NYC metro numbers typically used by local Jewish groups are much smaller than the MSA/CSA/urban area boundaries. The local estimates are only for NYC and a few counties in NY and NJ. They aren't counting the enormous Jewish populations on the metropolitan fringe, in Rockland and Orange Counties, and in Lakewood and Deal, NJ.

Rockland County, NY is estimated to have the highest % Jewish of any U.S. county (but again, hard to agree on an exact count when it isn't a Census count). Most Jewish town in the U.S. (and probably anywhere outside of Israel) is Kiryas Joel, NY, which is in Orange County, NY.
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  #86  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2016, 12:41 AM
Docere Docere is offline
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The country with the most reliable census data for Jewish populations in Canada where Jewish organizations are able to use a combined religion and ethnicity count.

I suspect a lot of the Western US communities in particular have a lot of "one Jewish grandparent" types in their counts.
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  #87  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2016, 1:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post

I suspect a lot of the Western US communities in particular have a lot of "one Jewish grandparent" types in their counts.
I've wondered about that too, especially for the Bay Area, which appears to have a huge Jewish population, yet the visible Jewish presence is very minimal. Even LA, which definitely has a large visible Jewish population, I'm not totally convinced is apples-to-apples accurate. Outside of West LA, I see very little Jewish presence.

But there's no national Census of Jews in the U.S., so very hard to confirm suspicions. And maybe it's just that the West Coast has less visible ethnic cleavages.
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  #88  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2016, 2:35 AM
austlar1 austlar1 is offline
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Long article, but the part about current residential trends in Jewish Los Angeles is interesting. http://ejewishphilanthropy.com/from-...h-los-angeles/
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  #89  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2016, 6:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I've wondered about that too, especially for the Bay Area, which appears to have a huge Jewish population, yet the visible Jewish presence is very minimal. Even LA, which definitely has a large visible Jewish population, I'm not totally convinced is apples-to-apples accurate. Outside of West LA, I see very little Jewish presence.

But there's no national Census of Jews in the U.S., so very hard to confirm suspicions. And maybe it's just that the West Coast has less visible ethnic cleavages.
Yeah, what's are the "Jewish suburbs" of the Bay Area? I can't think of one. Even Seattle has Mercer Island.
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  #90  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2016, 3:13 PM
Larry King Larry King is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers2001 View Post
In the 1980's the Oxford Circle Neighborhood was predominately Jewish, towards the late 80's early 90's they generally progressed northward to the Bustleton/Somerton section of the city. And as the late 90's Early 2000's came around the American Jewish population left for Huntingdon Valley, Newtown and Richboro areas. It was generally replace by Russian Jews.
Yep in a few generations my family went from

logan -> oxford circle -> upper dublin township -> society hill

Pretty typical
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  #91  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2016, 7:51 PM
Flyers2001 Flyers2001 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry King View Post
Yep in a few generations my family went from

logan -> oxford circle -> upper dublin township -> society hill

Pretty typical
Yeah, Oxford Circle was a pretty tight nit Jewish community in the 80's. Lived next to Max Myers Playground before moving North to Somerton.

Its a shame what has happened to parts of Oxford Circle.
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  #92  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2016, 8:15 PM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
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breakin it right on down to the nitty gritty in ohio:


Ohio – Jewish population

Total= 143,715 (2015) ; 158,560 (1971) ; chg (1971-2015)= - 9,945
Rank=8th <--- stable for many decades


>1000

Athens
Lima
Hamilton-Middletown-Oxford
Zanesville
Marion
Mansfield
Lorain
Wooster
Elyria-Oberlin
Sandusky-Fremont-Norwalk


1,000-4,999

Akron-Kent
Canton-New Philadelphia
Toledo-Bowling Green
Youngstown-Warren
Dayton


Columbus-Franklin co (25,500)
Cincinnati-Hamilton co (27,000)
Cleveland-Cuyahoga co (80,800)


More:
http://www.jewishdatabank.org/Studie...fm?FileID=3335
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  #93  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2016, 9:26 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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And Cleveland's 80,000 Jews are very concentrated so Jewish Clevelanders live in more densely Jewish environment than other cities with similar sized Jewish populations

http://beltmag.com/next-year-tremont/
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  #94  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2016, 11:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Outside of West LA, I see very little Jewish presence.
In the LA area, Jews are also present in the southern and western San Fernando Valley, and from what I've heard, they've also been moving into the Conejo Valley and into Thousand Oaks. Many are non-Orthodox, "assimilated" or non-practicing Jews.
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  #95  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2016, 10:17 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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The postwar "gilded ghetto" of Great Neck remains 70% Jewish, but it has become heavily Persian and much more religiously and politically conservative.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/worri...id-zielenziger
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  #96  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2016, 10:50 PM
CastleScott CastleScott is offline
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Being from metro Denver and of Jewish ancestory I recall a Jewish community of around 115,000-120,000 which makes it perhaps the largest between St Louis and the west coast. Many of the Orthodox Jews seemed to live in west Denver just south of Sloans Lake although there seemed to be a larger non-Orthodox community in southeast Denver spilling into Aurora.

As for my newer home of Sacramento I really don't know the numbers but I'm guessing its around 80,000-90,000.
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  #97  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2016, 2:22 AM
Crawford Crawford is offline
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
The postwar "gilded ghetto" of Great Neck remains 70% Jewish, but it has become heavily Persian and much more religiously and politically conservative.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/worri...id-zielenziger
Yeah, Great Neck is indeed still very Jewish, but doesn't remotely resemble pre-1980 Great Neck. It's very Persian and Orthodox-leaning. It's kind of the East Coast version of the Beverly Hills Persian community,
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  #98  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2016, 6:37 PM
RST500 RST500 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I've wondered about that too, especially for the Bay Area, which appears to have a huge Jewish population, yet the visible Jewish presence is very minimal. Even LA, which definitely has a large visible Jewish population, I'm not totally convinced is apples-to-apples accurate. Outside of West LA, I see very little Jewish presence.

But there's no national Census of Jews in the U.S., so very hard to confirm suspicions. And maybe it's just that the West Coast has less visible ethnic cleavages.
There is nothing in the Bay Area comparable to LA's Beverly Hills, Fairfax District, and Ventura Blvd in the Valley, but there is a significant Jewish presence in Palo Alto and the Berkeley Hills.
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  #99  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2016, 4:26 AM
Docere Docere is offline
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I looked at census tract data for Toronto. Looks like the Bathurst corridor north of St. Clair Ave. is about 35% Jewish. They make a majority in four census tracts. Here are some Jewish neighborhoods:

Forest Hill/Cedarvale 11,905 36.5%

Bathurst-Lawrence 15,045 39.1%

Bathurst Manor/Clanton Park 11,110 32.6%

These areas are quite mixed socioeconomically, and include a lot of apartment buildings as well as SFHs. There is a significant Filipino population in this area as well. Bathurst-Lawrence includes the public housing project of Lawrence Heights.

Last edited by Docere; Nov 22, 2016 at 4:38 AM.
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  #100  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2016, 6:12 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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One thing I've noticed is that a lot of the postwar Jewish middle class suburbs have "gone Orthodox": i.e. the Five Towns of Long Island, Silver Spring, Oak Park, Skokie, North York etc.

Even New Rochelle which was the "Jewish suburb" of Westchester before Scarsdale I believe is the center of Orthodoxy in Westchester.
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