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  #61  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 12:14 AM
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Because scrapple isn't pimento cheese.
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  #62  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 6:35 PM
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hmmm, lesse...mosquitos, alligators, swamps, hurricanes, racial strife, hot weather, storm surges and low topography???
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  #63  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 6:42 PM
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hmmm, lesse...mosquitos, alligators, swamps, hurricanes, racial strife, hot weather, storm surges and low topography???
In other words, Houston.
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  #64  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 7:33 PM
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oh yeah?? I love reading about forgotten calamities. Apparently the 1901 Galveston hurricane was the single deadliest day in us history, which killed 12,000 people. wow! 145 mph winds and a 15 foot storm surge. I take living in the PNW for granted. we might have a giant mega fault off our shores but gulf coast folks roll the dice every year! id still live down there though. id just build a cement geodesic home on stilts! what do people do with their boats though. ive always wondered that....
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  #65  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 9:57 PM
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^
They have mad insurance on them and if they haven't moved them, which they usually don't have time to do, they get smashed up. After Hurricane in 2008, I drove down to Galveston and the Louisiana coast and there were shrimp boats, sail boats, even some oil rigs washed way inland and destroyed. I drove around the coast about 4 months after the hurricane and it looked like it had just hit still.
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  #66  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 10:36 PM
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^^^^that's nutty. hurricanes are scary as $%^& I bet. I read some article about high rise hurricane technology in Miami. they talked about all of the improvements they've made over the years. like not having building electrical stuff in the basement (good idea), not having rocks on the roof for insulations or whatever they have rocks on roof for (turn into glass breaking missles), oh and impact glass. how tons of old condos aren't retrofitted with it.
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  #67  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 11:31 PM
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^^^^that's nutty. hurricanes are scary as $%^& I bet. I read some article about high rise hurricane technology in Miami. they talked about all of the improvements they've made over the years. like not having building electrical stuff in the basement (good idea), not having rocks on the roof for insulations or whatever they have rocks on roof for (turn into glass breaking missles), oh and impact glass. how tons of old condos aren't retrofitted with it.
There's also been an increased focus on restoring dunes between structures and the waterline. My family has a condo in Panama City Beach and after 2005, the entire city embarked on a dune restoration project. Slowly, but surely, the dunes are building up. They mitigate erosion and help dampen the severity of storm surge (of course, the destruction of coastal wetlands has enormously contributed to the ability of storm surge to damage built up environments).

Even though Hurricane Ivan cause a lot of damage along Alabama's Gulf coast, the existing dunes served as buffers and provided a lot of protection damage that could have been a lot worse. This in stark contrast to the Mississippi coast during Katrina where all of the beaches are man-made and no natural dunes are present
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  #68  
Old Posted May 12, 2017, 11:46 PM
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^^^I bet dunes helped. if you do street view in gulfport, ms along the beach, it looks like the bomb went off there. that was from Katrina??? like nice beach front property, no houses!
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  #69  
Old Posted May 13, 2017, 2:39 AM
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Because scrapple isn't pimento cheese.
this

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  #70  
Old Posted May 14, 2017, 4:12 AM
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I disagree that charleston wasn't the NYC of the south because of air conditioner ning not being built until,the 20th century. Look at Rome, Madrid, Cairo Mexico City, Mumbai shanghai. They are all heavily urbanized with millions of people and are sweltering hot.
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  #71  
Old Posted May 14, 2017, 5:01 PM
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I disagree that charleston wasn't the NYC of the south because of air conditioner ning not being built until,the 20th century. Look at Rome, Madrid, Cairo Mexico City, Mumbai shanghai. They are all heavily urbanized with millions of people and are sweltering hot.
Mexico City is high a elevation/temperate climate.

Also NY can be pretty miserable during the summer months.
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  #72  
Old Posted May 14, 2017, 10:25 PM
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I disagree that charleston wasn't the NYC of the south because of air conditioner ning not being built until,the 20th century. Look at Rome, Madrid, Cairo Mexico City, Mumbai shanghai. They are all heavily urbanized with millions of people and are sweltering hot.
Rome and Mexico City are hardly "sweltering hot". Mexico City has basically San Diego weather (but much wetter), and Rome has basically LA weather.

Even today, no one in Mexico City has air conditioning.
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  #73  
Old Posted May 15, 2017, 1:05 AM
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Mobile was Florida's counterpart. Spanish Florida once stretched west to the Mississippi River. The Alabama section of Spanish Florida was taken by the US in 1819. The US got the rest of Florida in 1821. East Florida (roughly everything east and south of the Suwannee River) was too dangerous for US expansion until the end of the Seminole Wars in 1858.
Well, sure. Louisiana has the Florida Parishes going up to and including Baton Rouge.

But considering (modern-day) Florida has hundreds of miles of coastline, it's surprising that it did not produce a city on the order of Mobile during that era. There was not a single Florida city in the Top 100 cities until 1910 when Jacksonville eked onto the list at #97.

It's just surprising to me that Florida was such a complete and utter backwater for the entire 19th Century before climate, leisure activities, and other "lifestyle" goals combined with air conditioning to produce today's mammoth Sunshine State.
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  #74  
Old Posted May 15, 2017, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post

It's just surprising to me that Florida was such a complete and utter backwater for the entire 19th Century before climate, leisure activities, and other "lifestyle" goals combined with air conditioning to produce today's mammoth Sunshine State.
I think it was a comparative backwater until at least the 70's or so. I have a family friend that moved from NYC to Palm Beach County in the 70's, and it was such a culture shock, with horrible schools, nonexistent services, and neighbors straight out of Deliverance.

They couldn't stand the thought of raising their kids there, in a place where the local library was a joke, schools were underfunded, and neighbors weren't intellectually curious. They sold their home and high-tailed it off to Orange County, CA (they wanted year-round warmth)
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  #75  
Old Posted May 16, 2017, 11:04 PM
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Even though for much of its early history Florida was not as developed as other states, it did have have some significant cities. Key West and St. Augustine were decently large towns in the 19th century. But the state could have easily produced a major port city if the US focused on it and the rest of the South to the same extent it focused on cities in the Northeast, Midwest, and West during the same time.


Florida is also interesting as a location in comparison to other states due to its proximity to Latin America and the Caribbean. If Miami, Tampa, and/or Jacksonville came on the scene earlier, who knows if one of them would have competed with New Orleans or even Philly and Boston during the times we were building the Panama Canal or establishing banana republics. Miami's current state as a global Latin city is due to its proximity to Havana. If the Latin American influence was present early on, it would have led to Florida being even more unique in the South. It probably would have changed everything.
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  #76  
Old Posted May 16, 2017, 11:30 PM
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If you want to talk about "what ifs" and Florida / the coastal South . . . imagine if any of Cuba's petitions for admittance into the Union had gone through!
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