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  #21  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2017, 8:03 AM
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
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Originally Posted by JDRCRASH View Post
LA's Chinatown actually used to to be a Little Italy.
Interesting. San Francisco's Chinatown and Little Italy are adjacent and the Chinatown probably has expended some at the expense of Little Italy although because both are popular with tourists, both remain pretty vibrant.
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  #22  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2017, 10:32 AM
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Boston's Chinatown is still pretty vibrant and has a lot of chinese/asian residents although many also live in part of the northern section of the South End across the Mass Pike. The business section of Chinatown remains centered on Beech Street and the Theatre District in Boston overlaps Chinatown. Boston also has developed Chinatown/asian neighborhoods in Quincy south of the city and Malden north of the city.
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  #23  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2017, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by LeftCoaster View Post
Really?

I'd say Vancouver's Chinatown is under far more pressure from gentrification than ours.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/real-...ticle33351575/
I haven't been to Vancouver in years, but going by Streetview, Vancouver Chinatown barely exists. It looks to be either vacant and/or being overtaken by gentrification or skid row.

Plenty of cities had a Chinatown, now gone. Detroit, Cleveland, New Orleans all had semi-sizable Chinatowns. Usually lost through urban renewal and/or suburban flight.
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  #24  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2017, 12:31 PM
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no, cleveland's chinatown is alive and well. the city had three eras of chinatowns. the first was downtown on ontario, going back to the turn of the last century. the more familiar one that most older clevelanders would be familiar with was and is mostly along and just off rockwell in the e20's. it still exists. the more modern one, now dubbed asiatown, sprawls along superior, st. clair and payne avenues between the e20s-e50s.

of course they could use more chinese and asian residents, but then again cleveland could use more residents in general, so nothing is out of line there compared to the rest of the city. imo this near east side asiatown neighborhood is one the most interesting and dynamic neighborhood areas in the city. as far a being a chinatown, it has basically everything you would want to discover in one, including a night market, its a great place:

http://www.cleveland.com/entertainme..._asiatown.html


as far as improvements the only things i can think of that it needs is the typical cleveland issue of more people, perhaps a gate, which is often discussed, and obviously more publicity!
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  #25  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2017, 6:24 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I haven't been to Vancouver in years, but going by Streetview, Vancouver Chinatown barely exists. It looks to be either vacant and/or being overtaken by gentrification or skid row.
Yes, Van's Chinatown has faced pressure on two fronts. Plus the city has such a large Chinese population anyway that a specific Chinatown is kind of redundant.

Toronto's "old" Chinatown (which really only dates to the 1960s) is now just one among many. Still, it seems to have contracted a lot less than Vancouver's. It is basically intertwined with Kensington Market and lies just south of U of T, which helps give it some vibrancy.

One thing to keep in mind too is that the area around City Hall in Toronto (called The Ward) used to be in many respects the equivalent of Van's Downtown Eastside/Strathcona area. That's where Chinatown was until postwar urban renewal.
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  #26  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2017, 6:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
One thing to keep in mind too is that the area around City Hall in Toronto (called The Ward) used to be in many respects the equivalent of Van's Downtown Eastside/Strathcona area. That's where Chinatown was until postwar urban renewal.
Aren't the streets east of Yonge kinda the modern-day equivalent? I vaguely remember lots of social housing and homeless people a few blocks due east of Eaton Centre.
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  #27  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2017, 7:15 PM
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In many respects, yes. I think if Chinatown were at Dundas and Sherbourne its trajectory would likely have been different.
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  #28  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2017, 7:30 PM
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Although it's a dumb political attack ad, it does sort of explain how Richmond Chinese feel about Vancouver's Chinatown:

http://www.scmp.com/news/article/208...blaming-unisex

BTW: Liberals are actually the more conservative party in BC, liberalism being synonymous with "left-wing" is an American phenomenon.
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  #29  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2017, 9:07 PM
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I remember back in the 90's there was concerned the Chinese would consume North Beach in SF, however it's been mostly upscale whites moving into North Beach while the Chinese in SF who leave Chinatown prefer the suburbs. Last time I was in Chinatown I didn't notice any gentrification, still very crowded and gritty. I could see the area in SF's Richmond near Clement Street become more upscale, with upper class whites besides just Chinese.

As for LA's Chinatown, the Chinese abondoned it for the SG Valley, however many of the buyers of the new highrise condos in downtown are Chinese. Also the Goldline extension will connect Chinatown to Monterrey Park at some point.

Young upscale whites who are tired of the suburbs are moving back to cities, possibly will see the same trend with Asians who grow up in suburban Chinatowns.
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  #30  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 5:41 PM
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Speaking from observation, Chinese people seem to like newer developments over old housing; Asians in general seem to prefer newer housing, at least the ones in southern California do.

I work with a Taiwanese woman who is looking for a new home. She looked at a beautiful Craftsman house in South Pasadena, built in 1906. The only thing she didn't like about it was that it's old---she's afraid that ghosts live there. I wish I had told her "well the earth is old. For all you know, where you currently live was probably an ancient native American village." Which is very likely, being that she lives in San Gabriel, not far from the Mission.

Instead, she's been looking at brand new tract homes in places like Chino and West Covina, which I'm sure don't have the quality or character of the 1906 Craftsman. It doesn't surprise me that she actually liked Irvine.
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  #31  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 5:56 PM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Instead, she's been looking at brand new tract homes in places like Chino and West Covina, which I'm sure don't have the quality or character of the 1906 Craftsman. It doesn't surprise me that she actually liked Irvine.
Chinese love Irvine. They think it's insane that white people pay 2x to live in old homes in adjacent Newport Beach (and white people in NB think it's insane the Chinese want to live in hot, inland, souless Irvine).

I think Asians as a whole generally prefer new construction, nationwide. Even in places like suburban Detroit, the new housing developments in the nicer suburbs tend to be 50%+ Asian/Middle Eastern, while the older upscale housing is basically all white folks.
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  #32  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2017, 5:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I haven't been to Vancouver in years, but going by Streetview, Vancouver Chinatown barely exists. It looks to be either vacant and/or being overtaken by gentrification or skid row.

Plenty of cities had a Chinatown, now gone. Detroit, Cleveland, New Orleans all had semi-sizable Chinatowns. Usually lost through urban renewal and/or suburban flight.
st. louis had one downtown, which was demolished for urban renewal where busch stadium is now. the "chinatown" was "reborn" along a 1930s-50s inner suburban street not far from where i live. it's an unofficial chinatown, but it's where to find places where people are speaking mandarin and where you find real regional chinese food like dongbei, taiwanese, or "shanghai" soup dumplings etc. and more selection than the "american" chinese food crap.


stltoday.com

you can see the arch rising in the background prior to demolition.
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  #33  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2017, 1:41 AM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Speaking from observation, Chinese people seem to like newer developments over old housing; Asians in general seem to prefer newer housing, at least the ones in southern California do.

I work with a Taiwanese woman who is looking for a new home. She looked at a beautiful Craftsman house in South Pasadena, built in 1906. The only thing she didn't like about it was that it's old---she's afraid that ghosts live there. I wish I had told her "well the earth is old. For all you know, where you currently live was probably an ancient native American village." Which is very likely, being that she lives in San Gabriel, not far from the Mission.
No, please, by all means continue to discourage these superstitious, would-be buyers so the prices of all these craftsman/victorian/traditional relics in Central LA, Pasadena, Whittier, Monrovia, Claremont, etc etc can finally come down from their zany, overpriced levels for a change
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  #34  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2017, 1:56 AM
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Philadelphia's Chinatown is still very vibrant. It has a great restaurant scene. Lots of the typical Cantonese restaurants are giving way to a diverse cross section of Asian regional restaurants, like Schezuan, Dim-Sum, Xian, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Taiwanese, etc. Tons of bubble tea spots and now a couple Thai rolled ice cream places. And a food hall just opened. It's still mostly Chinese and hasn't gentrified. The neighborhood is growing - lots of the existing 3-4 story buildings are getting 1-2 story additions. It's a little rough around the edges, but not at all blighted.
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  #35  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2017, 2:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Speaking from observation, Chinese people seem to like newer developments over old housing; Asians in general seem to prefer newer housing, at least the ones in southern California do.

I work with a Taiwanese woman who is looking for a new home. She looked at a beautiful Craftsman house in South Pasadena, built in 1906. The only thing she didn't like about it was that it's old---she's afraid that ghosts live there. I wish I had told her "well the earth is old. For all you know, where you currently live was probably an ancient native American village." Which is very likely, being that she lives in San Gabriel, not far from the Mission.

Instead, she's been looking at brand new tract homes in places like Chino and West Covina, which I'm sure don't have the quality or character of the 1906 Craftsman. It doesn't surprise me that she actually liked Irvine.
Asians like new homes. Not sure why. We have a perfectly nice home but my mom always bugs us with "you should build a new home!" But why? We like our house.

For us it comes down to the Indian towns and villages where our parents come from. Everything is old. To them, old things remind them of the old country, with all of its relative poverty.
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  #36  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2017, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
Philadelphia's Chinatown is still very vibrant. It has a great restaurant scene. Lots of the typical Cantonese restaurants are giving way to a diverse cross section of Asian regional restaurants, like Schezuan, Dim-Sum, Xian, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Taiwanese, etc. Tons of bubble tea spots and now a couple Thai rolled ice cream places. And a food hall just opened. It's still mostly Chinese and hasn't gentrified. The neighborhood is growing - lots of the existing 3-4 story buildings are getting 1-2 story additions. It's a little rough around the edges, but not at all blighted.
Yeah, I've noticed that Philly's Chinatown, despite being right downtown, is hanging pretty strong. I suspect it's partially because the immediate area is less-than-fancy (the empty Gallery mall, the bus station and lots of homeless) and so gentrification pressure isn't overwhelming.

I stay at the Marriott, just south of Chinatown, every few months, and sometimes get a meal in Chinatown.
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  #37  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2017, 2:09 PM
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I'm not sure where you guys get the idea that the Chinese don't have money and somehow will get gentrified out.

Kind of condescending actually. In Chicago the Chinese are the gentrifiers instead of the other way around. They were the gentrifiers in Queens and Brooklyn as well, at least in some cases. In some areas they took over vacant storefronts.
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  #38  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2017, 3:27 PM
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I'm not sure where you guys get the idea that the Chinese don't have money and somehow will get gentrified out.
Why would you think they have money?

We aren't talking Chinese generally, but rather a very specific subset- aging, poor Chinese immigrants who happen to live in urban Chinatowns. Of course they could be subject to gentrification.

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Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
Kind of condescending actually. In Chicago the Chinese are the gentrifiers instead of the other way around. They were the gentrifiers in Queens and Brooklyn as well, at least in some cases. In some areas they took over vacant storefronts.
Wouldn't it be more condescending to assume that affluent Chinese would want to live in Chinese theme parks?

We're generally talking about first generation downtown Chinatowns. The Chinatown in Chicago (and in Brooklyn and Queens) are somewhat different, and not filled with 80-year old rent-controlled Cantonese. They also aren't surrounded by massive yuppie non-Chinese development pressures.
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  #39  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2017, 4:19 PM
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Pittsburgh's Chinatown was demolished for the construction of (and subsequent additions to) the Boulevard of the Allies and highway construction in the early 1920s thru 1950s.

It was small, but once stretched to the Monongahela River wharf, interspersed among the warehouses that were once numerous in the area, with 185 Chinese restaurants, shops, and laundries. The red outline shows the general historical extent of where Pittsburgh's Chinatown was, and the green shows all that remains.


These 3 buildings (2 of them restaurants) are pretty much all that remain:





"Chinatown" is now centered in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood, with a boom in Asian restaurants, influx of international Asian student residents, night markets, and where the lunar new year parade takes place. It's an interesting mix with the strong presence of Orthodox and Hasidic Jewish population.
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  #40  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2017, 4:29 PM
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"Chinatown" is now centered in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood, with a boom in Asian restaurants, influx of international Asian student residents, night markets, and where the lunar new year parade takes place. It's an interesting mix with the strong presence of Orthodox and Hasidic Jewish population.
that's kind of ow it is in st. louis, too, although it's heavily orthodox neighborhood of an inner suburb (that contains washington university closer in) instead of a more inner neighborhood like squirrel hill. the newer much more authentic chinese/taiwanese restaurants are absolutely fueled by chinese university students.
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