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  #1  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2017, 3:58 PM
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How Noisy Is Your Neighborhood?

Interactive Map: https://maps.bts.dot.gov/arcgis/apps...464cc0e9d5c9fb

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How Noisy Is Your Neighborhood? Now There's A Map For That







Quote:
There's no denying it: Los Angeles isn't exactly gentle on the ears.

That's one lesson, at least, from a comprehensive noise map created by the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. On the interactive U.S. map the agency released this week, which depicts data on noise produced primarily by airports and interstate highways, few spots glare with such deep and angry color as the City of Angels.

Blame the area's handful of major airports and its legendary snarls of traffic — ranked this year as the worst in the nation.

If any Angelenos would like to escape to quieter pastures, though, they've got options.

"More than 97 percent of the U.S. population has the potential to be exposed to noise from aviation and Interstate highways at levels below 50 decibels or roughly comparable to the noise level of a humming refrigerator," the BTS notes in its release.

The agency says it used data compiled by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Federal Highway Administration to draw up its map, also borrowing the tools of both to determine average daily noise levels produced by transportation.

So if you should happen to find yourself stuck beside a particularly cacophonous construction site or concert venue, sadly your aural plight won't get any mention from BTS.

But cities like New York City and Chicago naturally offer plenty of visual proof of just how loud it can be to live in a big city. Those bright spots of purple on the pointillist displays below can pack an average of more than 80 decibels of transportation noise a day — or, as BTS puts it, about as much noise as a garbage disposal.
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http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-w...a-map-for-that
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  #2  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2017, 7:31 PM
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Noise is SOOO much more complicated than that.

I used to live a block from a viaduct where the echo effect created a constant roar. That was fine, preferable even.

But a car alarm or "wooh!" shrieks when I'm trying to sleep? Hell no.

I live in a dense, semi-noisy neighborhood, but chose the alley side of the building...very quiet 99% of the time at night. The exceptions are when someone is talking on their balcony which echoes like hell. Or some douche lets their dog bark outside.
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  #3  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2017, 7:59 PM
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Yeah, the constant urban noise is easily blocked out after a while. Even things like distant sirens and such fade into the background easily. My neighbourhood is pretty quiet but I occasionally hear yelling outside at night as there are a number of rooming houses nearby and some interesting characters. That's really the only thing that bothers me. My previous place was about 100m from a major streetcar intersection with streetcars running 24hrs. For the first few nights it was hard to sleep but after a while it became background noise - to the point where when I moved I had trouble sleeping again without it!

Similarly one of my friends grew up in Caracas in an apartment on the side of a hill, so the roar of the city was constant. When his family moved home to suburban Niagara Falls he apparently couldn't sleep for days because it was so quiet.
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Old Posted Mar 25, 2017, 9:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by niwell View Post
Yeah, the constant urban noise is easily blocked out after a while. Even things like distant sirens and such fade into the background easily. My neighbourhood is pretty quiet but I occasionally hear yelling outside at night as there are a number of rooming houses nearby and some interesting characters. That's really the only thing that bothers me. My previous place was about 100m from a major streetcar intersection with streetcars running 24hrs. For the first few nights it was hard to sleep but after a while it became background noise - to the point where when I moved I had trouble sleeping again without it!

Similarly one of my friends grew up in Caracas in an apartment on the side of a hill, so the roar of the city was constant. When his family moved home to suburban Niagara Falls he apparently couldn't sleep for days because it was so quiet.


Funny! I suppose his suburban house was nowhere near the roar of Niagara Falls per se.

The question of noise in the city is an intersting and important one indeed. I used to live in a suburb of Montreal two very long blocks away from a highway and heavily used rail tracks that combined ViaRail, Suburban trains and high frequency Freight trains. Those two blocks were more like 4 city blocks long where I live now. In the summer, when it rained at night, the sound of cars and trucks was pretty loud .The airport was close by and a high school next door meant schoolbuses as well as city buses made the place fairly noisy in the middle of sprawly suburbia.

Fast forward to our move to the city in a neighborhood down the hill from downtown, a block away from an elevated freeway that I can see from my studio's window on the second floor of my old house. The noise is nowhere as intense as what it was. There is no bus on my street bar a couple of schoolbuses am and pm. The sound of mowers in the summer is non-existent. It is a lot more pleasant in this dense, quiet, leafy city street than our old place.
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Old Posted Mar 25, 2017, 9:54 PM
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I live on a busy Main Street in a dense urban neighborhood with buses that run right by my window about 10 min. That doesn't really bother me anymore and I have a fan on at night to drowned out the noise. Whats really annoying is the d bags who rev their douche giant trucks outside my window down the street. In the summer though motorcycle d bags get to be incredibly annoying. One asshole works early I guess and revs his engine all the way down the street at about 630 in the morning every single day during the warmer months and theres a bar a block away that motorcycle dicks hangout all summer long and rev their engines trying to show off. And the occasional white trash idiots arguing with each other late at night screaming up and down the street are annoying. But I still would much rather live in a dense urban annoying sound neighborhood than the suburbs any day of the week.
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Old Posted Mar 26, 2017, 12:07 AM
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I've found that living on a relatively high floor is the best when it comes to city noise. Once you’re up higher than the eighth floor or so, the city sounds completely different. You can hear more. You can hear every siren and every train horn off in the distance, etc., but it all sort of blends together into a steady, quiet hum of city noise. The more annoying sounds that might happen in close proximity to your building, such as a car honking or idiots screaming, aren’t nearly as annoying way up there as they would be if you were down on the first or second floor.
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  #7  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2017, 12:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by photoLith View Post
I live on a busy Main Street in a dense urban neighborhood with buses that run right by my window about 10 min. That doesn't really bother me anymore and I have a fan on at night to drowned out the noise. Whats really annoying is the d bags who rev their douche giant trucks outside my window down the street. In the summer though motorcycle d bags get to be incredibly annoying. One asshole works early I guess and revs his engine all the way down the street at about 630 in the morning every single day during the warmer months and theres a bar a block away that motorcycle dicks hangout all summer long and rev their engines trying to show off. And the occasional white trash idiots arguing with each other late at night screaming up and down the street are annoying. But I still would much rather live in a dense urban annoying sound neighborhood than the suburbs any day of the week.
At the risk of offending any of my fellow skyscraper nerds who might also happen to be Harley-Davidson enthusiasts or whatever, I’m going to go ahead and say that if you own a ridiculously loud motorcycle, you’re an idiot. You’re not impressing anyone. Nobody thinks you’re cool. We all just think you’re an idiot. I can’t tell you how much it pisses me off when I see a pack of Hells Angels types roaring down the street, leaving a chorus of wailing car alarms in their wake. That may very well be my biggest pet peeve.
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  #8  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2017, 12:43 AM
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My condo is a few blocks from the CBD, next to an entertainment district (with an arena for the City's hockey team/concerts, a casino, and a convention centre), between two traffic arteries, near a transit maintenance facility, and also a near a rail line. It's fairly noisy, but easily filtered out -- as others have mentioned. It helps that I'm twenty storeys up.

One thing about the background noise is that it takes on a different pitch and intensity depending on what time of day it is. On the whole, it's cyclical. But it is also punctuated by much sharper, more distinct noises like sirens, or the shouts of idiot sports fans.

Some noises stand out at certain times of day -- the loud ka-thunk of the freight trains coming to a halt is barely audible during the day, but at night it really stands out. I also can't hear the whine of diesel buses during the afternoon, but you can clearly tell when they are starting their morning runs.
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  #9  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2017, 4:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Hill View Post
At the risk of offending any of my fellow skyscraper nerds who might also happen to be Harley-Davidson enthusiasts or whatever, I’m going to go ahead and say that if you own a ridiculously loud motorcycle, you’re an idiot. You’re not impressing anyone. Nobody thinks you’re cool. We all just think you’re an idiot. I can’t tell you how much it pisses me off when I see a pack of Hells Angels types roaring down the street, leaving a chorus of wailing car alarms in their wake. That may very well be my biggest pet peeve.
Yeah, those guys are pathetic.
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  #10  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2017, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
Yeah, those guys are pathetic.
What they need is a big undergound garage where they rev up bigtime and smoke themselves out to a netherworld of non existence.
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  #11  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2017, 6:30 PM
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Well, I find the yappy coyotes annoying at night and also the train whistle from 5 miles or so across the valley.


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  #12  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2017, 6:57 PM
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Pretty damn noisey in downtown Los Angeles

Thankfully when they renovated my building they put in high quality windows
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  #13  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2017, 10:07 PM
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These look like maps of airport flight paths.
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  #14  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2017, 3:09 AM
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Quiet, except for the construction noise of the McMansions constantly going up.
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  #15  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2017, 3:16 AM
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
Yeah, those guys are pathetic.
That is the whole point, to piss people off. That, and the fact that they get a hard on from pretending to be (or maybe actually being) naughty sociopaths.
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  #16  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2017, 1:50 PM
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Chicago is loud but I've gotten used to it. I live in Portage Park. You can hear the El from all over the city, firetrucks/ambulances/cops blare every 15 minutes, honking excessively, garbage trucks crashing dumpsters into each other at 4 in the morning, and the steady stream of airplanes landing at OHare. Every once in a while, a motor cycle gang will rumble by. I'm used to it however. But as loud as all of that is, nothing is louder than being under the Kennedy whenever the Blue Line roars by. That is loud. Even then I'm used to it. I find it comforting. I'd be more alarmed if Chicago was totally silent. Silence is more nerve racking than noise.
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Old Posted Mar 27, 2017, 3:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Hill View Post
At the risk of offending any of my fellow skyscraper nerds who might also happen to be Harley-Davidson enthusiasts or whatever, I’m going to go ahead and say that if you own a ridiculously loud motorcycle, you’re an idiot. You’re not impressing anyone. Nobody thinks you’re cool. We all just think you’re an idiot. I can’t tell you how much it pisses me off when I see a pack of Hells Angels types roaring down the street, leaving a chorus of wailing car alarms in their wake. That may very well be my biggest pet peeve.
I wanted to set up a tripwire on my street in NYC to decapitate those assholes when they went past at 3am.

Motorcycles over about 150cc are not appropriate for city use, and if you've removed the muffler to make it even louder then you should just kill yourself.
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Old Posted Mar 27, 2017, 5:08 PM
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150cc bikes with no mufflers sound terrible too. Those 2-cycle engines are piercing.

I don't mind the throaty sound of a Harley and they were always noisy but you can ride one without making a whole lot of noise It's the douchebags that throttle them wide open deliberately to piss off an entire square mile that need to be throat punched.
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Old Posted Mar 27, 2017, 5:10 PM
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Same with small cars, I've seen teenagers with £500 1998 Renault Clios where they have deliberately made them noisier by fitting huge exhausts and doing other crap like fitting spoilers that might be appropriate on an F1 car then taking great pleasure driving the car around in a circuit for no reason while making sure it produces as much noise as possible as if that might impress somebody.

For me I live on a very tight street where cars can't go much faster than 5mph because there is so little space so road noise isn't a problem. There is a train line just behind my house, there are 3-4 passenger trains per hour from 0600 to 2200 but I never notice them unless I'm outside in the garden, the only one I do notice from inside is a big freight train that passes by regularly at around 0530 but even that I got used to after a few months of living here. The only other noise really is a few people chatting while walking along the street, normally no issue but if they are loud/singing after being in the pub on a weekend night then it is more noticeable.

Oh yes, plus various birds chirping at daybreak and the occasional barbecue party by neighbours in the summer but they usually give us free food over the fence so I won't complain about that.
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Old Posted Mar 27, 2017, 5:26 PM
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im "used to it", but i dont think thats necessarily a good thing either. at a subconscious level, artificial light and noise at all hours of the day and night cant possibly be healthy to our psyche and mental wellbeing. i love city life and all it offers, but being able to truly disconnect from modern life occassionally is also an important thing IMO

probably the quietest place ive ever been is the south rim in Big Bend. its a transcendent thing to experience. of course theres no such thing as true silence. we've simply lost touch with the ability to hear nature, the cycle of the seasons, and the primal world at large.

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