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  #1  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2017, 9:37 PM
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Is your city split more along north-south or east-west lines?

In Toronto, although the streets are split east-west along Yonge, overall the city is split more along north-south lines, with the northern half being entirely suburban in character and the south including the core. In the pre-amalgamation City of Toronto however, north-south was probably more pronounced though.
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  #2  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2017, 9:47 PM
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San Francisco's Market Street, which bisects the street grid, run east-west.


https://www.google.com/search?q=SF+M...FeYQeFVrLp4-M:

South of Market the streets run perpendicular to and parallel to Market. North of it, they don't:


https://www.google.com/search?q=SF+s...fOgVQjwvS01eM:
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  #3  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2017, 9:54 PM
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northside vs. southside

cubs vs. sox
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  #4  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2017, 9:58 PM
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  #5  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2017, 10:12 PM
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define "split"...whats happening at the divide? income differences? household type? portland is broken up into quadrants but id say the true cultural divide is 82nd avenue. west of that is new, gentrified/transplant portland, east of that is townie, working class portland. we have lots of other rifts too but that's the biggest one..
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  #6  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2017, 10:18 PM
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Urban form, class, culture etc.
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Old Posted Apr 25, 2017, 10:28 PM
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ok, well the obvious change in urban form occurs at the river. to the west is downtown, oldtown, the pearl and NW portland. the most dense and urban part of the city. to the east has traditionally been all of the single family neighborhoods which are now ascending quickly with losts of infill. the form is much different though, think leafy streetcar suburbs. there is a section the borders the river directly to the east of downtown that's light industrial and warehouses, but that identity is quickly changing too. will probably be pearl district 2.0 soon. the big money is in the west hills and some some of the sw suburbs. when you see that range of hills behind downtown, that's our old money section. probably some new tech money up their now though...
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Old Posted Apr 25, 2017, 11:34 PM
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So basically west Portland is the core of the city and where the money is, the inner east is hipsters/gentrifiers and the outer east is a semi-suburban area where the working class locals are?
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Old Posted Apr 25, 2017, 11:46 PM
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Montréal is textbook East-West divide at boulevard St-Laurent/St Lawrence blvd. the language divide sits on that North South artery that we call "the Main". Of course the city is much more complex, and French and English are spoken on either side but it is still split in half culturally on that axis as it was a hundred forty years ago. It's a given in this city that East and West are French and English but it isn't something that is drummed in.
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  #10  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2017, 11:51 PM
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^ Ironically, in Montreal, West and East are more South and North.

Anyways, Edmonton is more split by north and south. The river is the main dividing line, though as it follows a southwest-northeast axis, parts "north of the river" in the west end, technically further south than downtown, are fairly affluent. Whereas places in the northeast that hug the river, except the Highlands, tend to be more middle class and even lower income.

There is a minor west-east division, but it is subordinate to the north-south one. For example, the Southwest is more desirable than the Southeast.
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  #11  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 12:22 AM
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Flagstaff is east-west, if only because Arizona's tallest mountain range (San Francisco Peaks) lie directly north of the city.

Phoenix is divided into east-west depending on which direction from Central Avenue you're heading (streets are east of Central and avenues are west of Central). The suburbs are split into "East Valley" and "West Valley" but I'm not really sure how much of that actually includes the City of Phoenix. It's defined more by the surrounding cities, with Glendale/Peoria/Sun City/Goodyear/Buckeye in the West and Mesa/Chandler/Tempe/Scottsdale/Gilbert in the East

Cincinnati is east-west with Vine Street being the divider, but also has a north-south split because of the Ohio River and Kentucky.
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  #12  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 1:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docere View Post
So basically west Portland is the core of the city and where the money is, the inner east is hipsters/gentrifiers and the outer east is a semi-suburban area where the working class locals are?
kinda....the inner east and ne is more dual income, 100k hipster households and gentrified or gentrifying neighborhoods. there is still some semblance of old, inner city portland left but their neighbors probably drive an electric car and eat organic food. the west is "big city" portland, high density everybody. and up the hill is where the big money is. over the hill, is the really tech money in washington county. "may or may not be working" in a punk rock band, barista portland got priced out about 10 years ago. i dont know where they live now. the urban frontier has shifted about 4 times in the last 8 years or so. outer east is still pretty working class but the hipster home owners are creeping over the 82nd line too.
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  #13  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 1:15 AM
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DC is *defintely* east/west. This map show racial demographics, but there are any number of other indicators that show a similar break.

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  #14  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 1:34 AM
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Winnipeg before unicity used to be distinctly "poor North" and "wealthy South". Since unicity though I would say "Francophone East" has been added to the mix, but the "poor North" and "wealthy South" still hold true on the East side of the Red River too.
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  #15  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 2:22 AM
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I have no idea how NYC is split. I guess East/West on the Hudson River? Not a big cultural or economic difference between, say, LI and NJ, though. You get a bit more for your money west of the Hudson but that's pretty much just accounting for worse transit connections. Regional valuations and wealth are tied to easy access to Manhattan, mostly.

Detroit and Cleveland are definitely East/West, though in Detroit West is the favored quarter/wealth belt and in Cleveland it's East.
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  #16  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 2:59 AM
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Maybe by borough? Obviously this is simplistic.

Manhattan is north-south, and that would work for Manhattan and the Bronx together too (Upper Manhattan and the Bronx on one side, the UES, UWS, Midtown and Lower Manhattan on the other).

Queens would be east-west: more urban western Queens vs. more suburban eastern Queens.

Staten Island: more urban and ethnically mixed north, suburban Italian south.

Brooklyn: probably north-south

Bronx: east-west in the past, may be north-south today
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  #17  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 3:03 AM
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Hamilton is definitely North-South with the escarpment. Or main city vs. Burlington.
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  #18  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 4:53 AM
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The starkest economic and social differences in Calgary tend to be southwest/northeast.
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  #19  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 4:57 AM
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It seems like all the Canadian Prairie cities follow the same model of primarily north-south (south being more affluent) and a secondary east-west one (west being more affluent).

In Vancouver, there's historically been a very strong east-west divide, around Cambie or Main streets. On the other hand, there's also a north-south one in the sense that the northern half is the more urban part, and the southern part more suburban in character. The southern half was annexed in 1929.
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  #20  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 5:25 AM
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From the West Side to the East Side
Everybody's very happy
'Cause the sun is shining all the time
Looks like another perfect day
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