HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #21  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 5:40 AM
GlassCity's Avatar
GlassCity GlassCity is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Delta,Vancouver
Posts: 3,276
The City of Vancouver itself is strongly east-west, but the metro area's kind of all over the place. Really can't think of a coherent way to describe it right now in terms of east-west/north-south.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #22  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 6:56 AM
10023's Avatar
10023 10023 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 14,214
West London vs. East London for the most part and in the common consciousness. But there is also a divide between north of the river and south.
__________________
There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #23  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 11:12 AM
Beedok Beedok is online now
Exiled Hamiltonian
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 6,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docere View Post
It seems like all the Canadian Prairie cities follow the same model of primarily north-south (south being more affluent) and a secondary east-west one (west being more affluent).

In Vancouver, there's historically been a very strong east-west divide, around Cambie or Main streets. On the other hand, there's also a north-south one in the sense that the northern half is the more urban part, and the southern part more suburban in character. The southern half was annexed in 1929.
Isn't Saskatoon richest in the South-East and poorest in the West?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #24  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 1:35 PM
Leo the Dog Leo the Dog is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: The Lower-48
Posts: 4,789
San Diego is a little tricky. I'd say we're more split along Coastal/Inland zones. Due to physical constraints, development is concentrated and squeezed in a north/south pattern between the ocean and mountains. The east/west component is primarily about the micro climates factoring in. Generally it is more desirable to be located near the ocean for mild year round weather, cooler summers, warmer winters.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #25  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 3:29 PM
spoonman's Avatar
spoonman spoonman is offline
SD/OC
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,241
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo the Dog View Post
San Diego is a little tricky. I'd say we're more split along Coastal/Inland zones. Due to physical constraints, development is concentrated and squeezed in a north/south pattern between the ocean and mountains. The east/west component is primarily about the micro climates factoring in. Generally it is more desirable to be located near the ocean for mild year round weather, cooler summers, warmer winters.
For weather, it's coastal vs inland. For wealth it's more north vs south.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #26  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 3:29 PM
Lakelander's Avatar
Lakelander Lakelander is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 3,825
Jacksonville is split by the St Johns River. The older core is north/west of the river and the newer Southside is sandwiched between the river (south/east) and the Atlantic Ocean. With that said, the Eastside is actually west of the river. Prior to consolidation with South Jacksonville in 1932, Jacksonville didn't cross the river.
__________________
Metro Jacksonville
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #27  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 4:29 PM
Streamliner's Avatar
Streamliner Streamliner is offline
Frequent Lurker
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: California
Posts: 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by spoonman View Post
For weather, it's coastal vs inland. For wealth it's more north vs south.
I agree, there's definitely a North County/South County dichotomy for wealth, status and desirability. But within North County, there's definitely a gradient with the coast being more desirable than inland areas.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #28  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 4:53 PM
ChargerCarl's Avatar
ChargerCarl ChargerCarl is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Los Angeles/San Francisco
Posts: 2,326
I'd be interested to hear other LA guys' opinions. Yes, theres an East-West divide, but theres also a North-South one that seems just as dividing.
__________________
This Machine Kills NIMBYs
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #29  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 5:38 PM
Leo the Dog Leo the Dog is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: The Lower-48
Posts: 4,789
Quote:
Originally Posted by spoonman View Post
For weather, it's coastal vs inland. For wealth it's more north vs south.
^ agreed. Wealth is also concentrated along the coast too.

The 8 frwy is often referred to in political elections. South of the 8 vote democrat and north republican - generally.

Also large parts of East County are significantly less wealthy than areas to its west. Within city limits you have San Carlos vs La Jolla.


Here's a map of the 2012 Bob Filner (D) vs. Carl DeMaio (R) Mayoral race. The 8 freeway runs east/west.

Last edited by Leo the Dog; Apr 27, 2017 at 1:16 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #30  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 5:53 PM
sopas ej's Avatar
sopas ej sopas ej is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South Pasadena, California
Posts: 3,161
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChargerCarl View Post
I'd be interested to hear other LA guys' opinions. Yes, theres an East-West divide, but theres also a North-South one that seems just as dividing.
Definitely an east-west divide, and what constitutes the border between the two has been shifting over the years.

When I was a kid in the 1970s and 1980s, the "Westside" was generally everything west of Beverly Hills; some might've even said everything west of the 405. And then beginning in the mid-1990s, the Westside somehow started drifting east; some put the dividing line at Fairfax, and some even put it at La Brea. Demographic changes and gentrification has changed everything from when I was a kid. Mid-Wilshire used to still be a fairly prestigious business address in the 1980s; nobody refers to Mid-Wilshire as such anymore; now it's part of Koreatown. Supposedly more people with money have been moving into downtown, so, downtown is less and less being seen as a place to avoid.

North-south divide, I'm aware of a "divide," but where is the line? And which north and south? The Valley versus everything south of the SM Mountains/Hollywood Hills? And the Valley seems to have its own divide, north-south and east-west.

North of Olympic vs. south of Olympic? When my family lived in the Miracle Mile, it somehow seemed more "prestigious" to say you lived north of Olympic. North or south of the 10 Freeway? I can see a divide between South LA and everything north of there... But are San Pedro/Wilmington/Harbor City included in what's considered southern Los Angeles? San Pedro definitely has a completely different vibe than other parts of LA.
__________________
Patriotism is an inflated assertion of imaginary superiority.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #31  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 6:07 PM
Centropolis's Avatar
Centropolis Centropolis is offline
crisis actor
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: the cypress trees
Posts: 7,117
st. louis = southside vs central/westside vs northside. central/west is wealthiest followed by south then north. then you have the eastside dangling out there, but the eastside really is almost its own universe (illinois) with american industrial bottoms vs upland etc.
__________________
fastwalker
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #32  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 7:20 PM
muppet's Avatar
muppet muppet is offline
if I sang out of tune
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: London
Posts: 4,309
Used to be this:

Video Link


Now this:

Video Link
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #33  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 8:29 PM
ColDayMan's Avatar
ColDayMan ColDayMan is offline
B!tchslapping Since 1998
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Cincinnati-Dayton-Columbus
Posts: 19,598
Cincinnati: East-West
Cleveland: East-West
Columbus: East/West/North/South (all four are equal and have certain "images" for each side)
Dayton: East-West
__________________
Click the x: _ _ X _ _!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #34  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 11:38 PM
Ant131531 Ant131531 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 1,165
Atlanta has multiple divides: The obvious North/South divide in terms of wealth and race. Trendy East Atlanta(Old Fourth Ward, Inman Park, Virginia Highlands) vs. run-down West Atlanta(Bankhead, The Bluff, Vine City). Last but not least, Buckhead vs. the rest of Atlanta. Buckhead is basically it's own city....it feels that way.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2017, 11:49 PM
The Chemist's Avatar
The Chemist The Chemist is offline
恭喜发财!
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: 中国上海/Shanghai
Posts: 8,171
Shanghai is split east/west by the Huangpu River, which used to provide a geographical barrier (the first permanent road links weren't built across the river until 1991). To this day, the two halves of the city are referred to as Puxi (West of the River) and Pudong (East of the River).

My birth city of Dublin has a pretty severe North South divide, again produced by a river, this time the Liffey.
__________________
"Nothing is too wonderful to be true, if it be consistent with the laws of nature." - Michael Faraday (1791-1867)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #36  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2017, 12:16 AM
Private Dick's Avatar
Private Dick Private Dick is offline
Mal Vivant
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: D.C.
Posts: 3,098
PA cities...

Philadelphia is definitely North-South, but then there's also West Philly, so...

Pittsburgh is a tough one to classify with discrete directional classifications because the city, surrounding municipalities/suburbs are just craziness scattered about all the hills. I'd say North-South for an overall regional viewpoint (north being north of the Allegheny or Ohio or along the Allegheny and south being south of the Monongahela or Ohio or along the Monongahela). There's the defined Northside vs. Southside in the city and North Hills vs. South Hills suburbs, but the East End is the most cohesive, populated, and developed section of the city... without a West End of the same stature to complement it... and then there's the eastern suburbs and all the towns that are located up and down the rivers... so, it's tough to really say. The region is highly divided by rivers, hills, and valleys much more than it is by compass direction.

Erie is definitely East-West, stretching along the lakeshore

Scranton is East-West, but the region as a whole runs more N-S

Allentown... East-West, with the East Side and the Wards to the east of the Lehigh River and the West End on the west side
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #37  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2017, 12:22 AM
ChargerCarl's Avatar
ChargerCarl ChargerCarl is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Los Angeles/San Francisco
Posts: 2,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Definitely an east-west divide, and what constitutes the border between the two has been shifting over the years.

When I was a kid in the 1970s and 1980s, the "Westside" was generally everything west of Beverly Hills; some might've even said everything west of the 405. And then beginning in the mid-1990s, the Westside somehow started drifting east; some put the dividing line at Fairfax, and some even put it at La Brea. Demographic changes and gentrification has changed everything from when I was a kid. Mid-Wilshire used to still be a fairly prestigious business address in the 1980s; nobody refers to Mid-Wilshire as such anymore; now it's part of Koreatown. Supposedly more people with money have been moving into downtown, so, downtown is less and less being seen as a place to avoid.

North-south divide, I'm aware of a "divide," but where is the line? And which north and south? The Valley versus everything south of the SM Mountains/Hollywood Hills? And the Valley seems to have its own divide, north-south and east-west.

North of Olympic vs. south of Olympic? When my family lived in the Miracle Mile, it somehow seemed more "prestigious" to say you lived north of Olympic. North or south of the 10 Freeway? I can see a divide between South LA and everything north of there... But are San Pedro/Wilmington/Harbor City included in what's considered southern Los Angeles? San Pedro definitely has a completely different vibe than other parts of LA.
For the North/South divide I was thinking the 10 freeway, with North being the dense urban area of LA and the South being more suburban (but still pretty dense).
__________________
This Machine Kills NIMBYs
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #38  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2017, 12:30 AM
Shawn Shawn is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Tokyo
Posts: 4,527
Metro Boston is east-west, with the top of the wealth concentrated in Newton and Brookline, and then further out in the western "W" burbs (Weston, Wayland, Wellesley, Westwood, etc.).
__________________
“You are not entitled to your opinion. You are entitled to your informed opinion. No one is entitled to be ignorant.”
Harlan Ellison
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #39  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2017, 12:33 AM
montréaliste montréaliste is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Montréal, évidemment!
Posts: 1,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Chemist View Post
Shanghai is split east/west by the Huangpu River, which used to provide a geographical barrier (the first permanent road links weren't built across the river until 1991). To this day, the two halves of the city are referred to as Puxi (West of the River) and Pudong (East of the River).

My birth city of Dublin has a pretty severe North South divide, again produced by a river, this time the Liffey.

When I lived in Dublin in the eighties, I found that up until 200 years ago, the North side was wealthier than the even numbered South of Liffey districts. Interesting to me is the fact that small working class neighborhoods like Irishtown had a sweet proximity to the sea, and the beach sections were quite nice in the general area. Of all the ritzy suburban towns, Howth on the northern extremity is more beautiful than Bray in the extreme South.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #40  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2017, 1:11 AM
Leo the Dog Leo the Dog is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: The Lower-48
Posts: 4,789
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
Metro Boston is east-west, with the top of the wealth concentrated in Newton and Brookline, and then further out in the western "W" burbs (Weston, Wayland, Wellesley, Westwood, etc.).
I'd agree as a former resident of Brookline.

I'd also say that as one moves westward from Boston, it seems like the city abruptly ends (even though it really doesn't) whereas, north and south of the city, it appears more urbanized much farther out.

What do you think?
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 2:07 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.