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  #1  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 9:02 AM
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Mapping where Millenials are moving to (and leaving)



https://www.apartmentlist.com/renton...lation-trends/

In raw numbers, LA, Chicago, Detroit, Miami, Atlanta, Phoenix saw the largest drops in millenial population.
NYC, Houston, Dallas, San Francisco, Seattle, DC, Austin saw the largest gains.

Last edited by YSL; May 1, 2017 at 12:44 AM.
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  #2  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 12:48 PM
balletomane balletomane is offline
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Interesting map, those top cities that millennials are leaving are either shrinking (Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland) or are extremely sprawling (Los Angeles, Atlanta, Phoenix), Miami seems to be a bit of an outlier.

Should those trends continue I wonder how much it will effect the future success of these cities, especially the ones that are already shrinking?
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  #3  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 3:56 PM
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It is interesting that, despite popular perception, millenials are leaving Portland. This also shows that it may be time to invent the concept of the Old Midwest (Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati, St Louis, Toledo, Flint) vs the New Midwest (Minneapolis, Columbus, Kansas City, Indianapolis, Omaha, Grand Rapids, Iowa and the Dakotas). They are on clearly different tracks.
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  #4  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 4:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Chef View Post
It is interesting that, despite popular perception, millenials are leaving Portland. This also shows that it may be time to invent the concept of the Old Midwest (Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati, St Louis, Toledo, Flint) vs the New Midwest (Minneapolis, Columbus, Kansas City, Indianapolis, Omaha, Grand Rapids, Iowa and the Dakotas). They are on clearly different tracks.
Uhhh, no.

Chicago isn't the "old Midwest". That's ludicrous.

I'm sure the story is more complex than a simple interpretation that the red cities are the "cities of the past" and the green cities are the "cities of the future"
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  #5  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 4:24 PM
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Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post

I'm sure the story is more complex than a simple interpretation that the red cities are the "cities of the past" and the green cities are the "cities of the future"
No but things like overall growth and economic performance generally correspond to where millenials are moving to and from in the Midwest. I don't know if you noticed but Chicago isn't doing that well these days, it was one of the last cities to come out of the recession and is now posting metro population losses.
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  #6  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 4:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Chef View Post
No but things like overall growth and economic performance generally correspond to where millenials are moving to and from in the Midwest. I don't know if you noticed but Chicago isn't doing that well these days, it was one of the last cities to come out of the recession and is now posting metro population losses.
This means nothing, the situations of Chicago and other cities are more nuanced than that, the last thing we need are more arbitrary labels that box in cities that are hardly related as it is.

Are you going to make the case that LA isn't "doing well" either? Should we call it old california?
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  #7  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 4:33 PM
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Seems like a lot of (but not all) of the growth has to do with cities/metros where there are large public universities (excluding places like LA, Phoenix and possibly Chicago)
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  #8  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 4:43 PM
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Originally Posted by The North One View Post
This means nothing, the situations of Chicago and other cities are more nuanced than that, the last thing we need are more arbitrary labels that box in cities that are hardly related as it is.

Are you going to make the case that LA isn't "doing well" either? Should we call it old california?
In the Midwest, the cities that millenials are moving to or from tend to correspond to the broader trends in those cities, in California they do not, Millenials are probably leaving LA because it is too expensive. There have been two Midwests for a while now, one that has had relatively strong growth, and one that has been mostly stagnant with slow growth or outright decline. It may not be a popular thing to say, especially on this forum where people's sense of self is tied up with their city, but I don't see the point in ignoring unpleasant facts because of people's feelings.
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  #9  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 4:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef View Post
It is interesting that, despite popular perception, millenials are leaving Portland. This also shows that it may be time to invent the concept of the Old Midwest (Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati, St Louis, Toledo, Flint) vs the New Midwest (Minneapolis, Columbus, Kansas City, Indianapolis, Omaha, Grand Rapids, Iowa and the Dakotas). They are on clearly different tracks.
the door of slackerdom officially closed in 2008. portland recovered from the recession but in the process, bounced back too well. all of the punk rock baristas got priced out of the central city. the (lazy) days of lackadaisical whimsy and 400 dollar rent are over. now were just a boring big city with shiny apartments and bumpy streets but you better have your resume tuned up i guess. glad to see the midwest revving things up a bit too though, especially grand rapids. that town is great, one of my favorite mid sized cities. also this map is probably deceiving. young people might be coming and going but it doesn't break it down by race, just age. certain cities are seeing whites move in and blacks move out. even atlanta is seeing that trend. but other cities like indianapolis and minneapolis are seeing large black gains. so people are just on the move. i dont think it necessarily tells the whole tale.
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  #10  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 5:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Chef View Post
In the Midwest, the cities that millenials are moving to or from tend to correspond to the broader trends in those cities, in California they do not, Millenials are probably leaving LA because it is too expensive. There have been two Midwests for a while now, one that has had relatively strong growth, and one that has been mostly stagnant with slow growth or outright decline. It may not be a popular thing to say, especially on this forum where people's sense of self is tied up with their city, but I don't see the point in ignoring unpleasant facts because of people's feelings.
Nobody is talking about people's feelings though, Chicago's core is exploding with wealth, population losses are mostly from lower incomes leaving the city, you hardly know what you're talking about only making quick judgments from the surface. Funny how your label is convenient for you and your feelings though.
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  #11  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 5:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef View Post
It is interesting that, despite popular perception, millenials are leaving Portland. This also shows that it may be time to invent the concept of the Old Midwest (Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati, St Louis, Toledo, Flint) vs the New Midwest (Minneapolis, Columbus, Kansas City, Indianapolis, Omaha, Grand Rapids, Iowa and the Dakotas). They are on clearly different tracks.
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
Interesting map, those top cities that millennials are leaving are either shrinking (Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland) or are extremely sprawling (Los Angeles, Atlanta, Phoenix), Miami seems to be a bit of an outlier.

Should those trends continue I wonder how much it will effect the future success of these cities, especially the ones that are already shrinking?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef View Post
No but things like overall growth and economic performance generally correspond to where millenials are moving to and from in the Midwest. I don't know if you noticed but Chicago isn't doing that well these days, it was one of the last cities to come out of the recession and is now posting metro population losses.
Are you serious?

Chicago metro has the highest employment numbers of all time right now. And the central area is going crazy. Chicago is building orders of magnitude more highrises than the entire Midwest and then some. For the Midwest, Chicago is not the "city of the past".

I could care less what this silly graph is showing.
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  #12  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 5:59 PM
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San Francisco seems to be swamped with Millennials and it can be problematic for other residents, especially the housing situation. I was realizing just yesterday how my large condo building has become "millennialized". The thing is that these recent graduates are used to dorm living and are willing to put 4 of themselves into a 2 bedroom apartment to share the rent--the sort of apartment in which I live alone. That puts an extra strain on everything in the building--more people in the gym, more in the pool and sauna, more in the elevators; more move-ins and move-outs--and in the city--much more population crammed into the same spaces, public and private. And the traffic and crowds on sidewalks and in lines for movies, restaurants and everywhere else are certainly noticeable.

A popular public park--Dolores Park--on a "nothing special except maybe the weather" Sunday

https://www.eventbrite.com/rally/san...-fort-mason-2/

Monday morning

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/D...nt-8329970.php
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  #13  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 6:37 PM
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Not surprised about Los Angeles.

High cost of living and a lousy job market, the worst of both worlds.
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  #14  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 6:58 PM
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And in another 10-15 years, these millennials will be fleeing the city in favor of the suburbs, as they settle down with their spouse and kids, replaced by the next generation of entitled 20 something college grads, living in cramped quarters with roommates, paying ridiculous rents and college loan payments while attempting to save enough for a down payment for a home which will be located outside of the city.
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  #15  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 7:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
San Francisco seems to be swamped with Millennials and it can be problematic for other residents, especially the housing situation. I was realizing just yesterday how my large condo building has become "millennialized". The thing is that these recent graduates are used to dorm living and are willing to put 4 of themselves into a 2 bedroom apartment to share the rent--the sort of apartment in which I live alone. That puts an extra strain on everything in the building--more people in the gym, more in the pool and sauna, more in the elevators; more move-ins and move-outs--and in the city--much more population crammed into the same spaces, public and private. And the traffic and crowds on sidewalks and in lines for movies, restaurants and everywhere else are certainly noticeable.

A popular public park--Dolores Park--on a "nothing special except maybe the weather" Sunday

https://www.eventbrite.com/rally/san...-fort-mason-2/

Monday morning

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/D...nt-8329970.php

wow, those a$$holes leave all that garbage? *inserts boot into ass*.
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  #16  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 7:12 PM
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Being from Pittsburgh it's weird to say this, but you guys are unfairly attacking Cleveland, which on that map has seen a slight influx of millennials. Maybe you're confusing it with Cincinnati?

Anyway, note that the linked list is metro based, not city based. Further, it tracks all millennials, not just those with college degrees. Therefore it's not really showing gentrification or anything like it, it's just showing regional migration trends across the entire U.S. for young people.
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  #17  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 7:20 PM
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Being from Pittsburgh it's weird to say this, but you guys are unfairly attacking Cleveland, which on that map has seen a slight influx of millennials. Maybe you're confusing it with Cincinnati?

Anyway, note that the linked list is metro based, not city based. Further, it tracks all millennials, not just those with college degrees. Therefore it's not really showing gentrification or anything like it, it's just showing regional migration trends across the entire U.S. for young people.
clearly they cant read a map. there's a large green dot above it indicating growth.
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  #18  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 8:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Leo the Dog View Post
And in another 10-15 years, these millennials will be fleeing the city in favor of the suburbs, as they settle down with their spouse and kids, replaced by the next generation of entitled 20 something college grads, living in cramped quarters with roommates, paying ridiculous rents and college loan payments while attempting to save enough for a down payment for a home which will be located outside of the city.
That's already started:
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-relea...300415487.html
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  #19  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 8:28 PM
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I notice a green dot in Western North Carolina that would be my little blip on the map. I'm not at all surprised.

Neither is my partner. He's in charge of shepherding new hires through their first few months at one of the biggest employers in this part of the state. He sent me this youtube clip one day along with a litany of curse words to explain how ever word of it is the unvarnished truth:

Video Link
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Old Posted Apr 30, 2017, 8:31 PM
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wow, those a$$holes leave all that garbage? *inserts boot into ass*.
Rec & Park gardener has Facebook meltdown over Dolores Park slobs
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