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  #21  
Old Posted May 2, 2017, 8:06 PM
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Says you, current community spaces have been a great benefit to these neighborhoods.

I don't see how this creates a "great legacy", the city can't and won't be kicking out Detroiters from their homes just to give it over to nature, these are people in case you forgot, not cattle. What you're suggesting is of little benefit to the city and makes no sense in the real world. There's no reason to destroy existing infrastructure just to create a greenbelt, the city already has plenty of parks.
Many of the world's great cities and open spaces were created in this way. Paris was almost entirely rebuilt in the early 19th century. Every grand boulevard in Europe required slum clearances at some point or another. Even the land that would become Central Park was home to squatters when it was designated as parkland.

I really think the difficulty of imposing eminent domain is one of the big things holding back American cities. Obviously no one would move without new housing, and they would be paid treble what their property is worth.
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  #22  
Old Posted May 2, 2017, 11:07 PM
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Many of the world's great cities and open spaces were created in this way. Paris was almost entirely rebuilt in the early 19th century. Every grand boulevard in Europe required slum clearances at some point or another. Even the land that would become Central Park was home to squatters when it was designated as parkland.

I really think the difficulty of imposing eminent domain is one of the big things holding back American cities. Obviously no one would move without new housing, and they would be paid treble what their property is worth.
this would require tons of capital. you might be better off building subsidized rental housing or some kind of multifamily situation. the west coast variant of public housing doesn't usually look to bad. townhome style developments, open space. at least those seem more like homes then giant brick filing cabinets full of poor people. who knows, maybe even some kind of co-housing might fill a niche. small owner occupied units with shared facilities. they might get market value for their home but that not going to be very much, the city would take a loss regardless. you can't build a new unit for 60k. and that's being generous. 90k in SW Detroit would get you a pretty nice home in a stable neighborhood by Detroit standards. some guy living out on a burned out block out by the state fairgrounds might get 8k...you are basically going to be reconstructing the projects. I think you are better off continuing basic city services in these far off neighborhoods and just wait for those people to die out. the avg lifespan of someone in Detroit is about 70 years old. the old timers will pass, and maybe the younger folks might choose to move on. I think a relocation program to another city would be more useful. buy out the house, give them a ticket, and let them start a new life with relatives in another state with a bank account full of 20 grand. dunno. its like our own kind of refugee situation. but the "dark side" of detroit's renaissance isn't anything new as we all know. its the tale of modern gentrification....
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Last edited by pdxtex; May 2, 2017 at 11:19 PM.
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  #23  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 12:59 AM
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Many of the world's great cities and open spaces were created in this way. Paris was almost entirely rebuilt in the early 19th century. Every grand boulevard in Europe required slum clearances at some point or another. Even the land that would become Central Park was home to squatters when it was designated as parkland.

I really think the difficulty of imposing eminent domain is one of the big things holding back American cities. Obviously no one would move without new housing, and they would be paid treble what their property is worth.
Not to be rude but you are totally clueless.

First of all, Detroit went absolutely CRAZY with eminent domain under the same ideas. Massive highways and failed urban renewal projects are still major scars on the city today. Coleman Young was kicking Detroiters out of their homes left and right, it's no wonder they left the city limits. I don't know how you can make such a claim when this country so gleefully gutted every urban inner-city neighborhood like a Jack O'Lantern. If eminent domain weren't so powerful we'd have a much better country today.

Second of all, Detroit already has a legendary park, it's called Belle Isle and it's larger than Manhatten's central park. Parks require maintenance and cost money, in fact, Belle Isle was turned into a state park so it wouldn't be a burden on the city when it exited bankruptcy and the city is already trying to bring back it's neglected parks as it is. You want to rip out brand new LED streetlights and grid just so the city can have more land to maintain? Bois de Boulogne and the renovation of Paris were built during the reign of a dictator, not exactly the kind of situation you want in a democracy. Paris also got extremely lucky since their renovation occurred during a time when cities still had no choice but to be walkable and compact. Haussmann midrises and boulevards would never be built today.
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  #24  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 1:32 AM
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The Paris Haussmann renovation-esque suggestion was really silly. You do realize at the time, Paris was under a fascist regime, right? Not to mention Paris was the capital of a powerful country at the time so even more focus and tax dollars went towards the renovation. That wouldn't work for Detroit. Let's be honest... If Detroit ever starts rapidly growing again, they'll be destroying the existing stock there anyway for new apartment buildings.

I mean, there are already so many urban prairies that exist in Detroit anyway so there's plenty of greenfields to build on if and when time comes without actually having to displace anyone.

If your over 45, you're likely to never see a dense, vibrant Detroit again in your lifetime(though if you're old enough, you did see it before it's decline). These type of long-term large scale renaissance takes several decades.
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  #25  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 2:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
The Paris Haussmann renovation-esque suggestion was really silly. You do realize at the time, Paris was under a fascist regime, right? Not to mention Paris was the capital of a powerful country at the time so even more focus and tax dollars went towards the renovation. That wouldn't work for Detroit. Let's be honest... If Detroit ever starts rapidly growing again, they'll be destroying the existing stock there anyway for new apartment buildings.

I mean, there are already so many urban prairies that exist in Detroit anyway so there's plenty of greenfields to build on if and when time comes without actually having to displace anyone.

If your over 45, you're likely to never see a dense, vibrant Detroit again in your lifetime(though if you're old enough, you did see it before it's decline). These type of long-term large scale renaissance takes several decades.
im 43!
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  #26  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 6:53 AM
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Jeez, whatever happened to "make no small plans"?

Anyway, I'm not talking about mass scale construction. At least limit new infill such that open spaces are of a certain size necessary to be useful public spaces. One could even move the odd house (it's not that hard with wood frame structures).
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  #27  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 11:55 AM
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Detroit doesn't need open space. It has a TON of neglected, little used parkland.

Metro Detroiters live in single family homes, with generous yards.
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  #28  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 1:40 PM
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If we're talking about the suburban areas of the city with generous yards, then I don't really care what happens. But cities require public spaces, and sizable ones. If there are no public spaces then there is no city - that's one of the key distinctions between urban and suburban.
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  #29  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 1:56 PM
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Detroit doesn't need open space. It has a TON of neglected, little used parkland.
i was gonna say, more open space is item #487 on detroit's priority list these days.

there are ridiculously larger fish to fry at the moment. fish that are being fried with all of the investment being poured into the city core, even if some of it is coming through dubious tax schemes that the city and state will be on the hook for. in an ideal world, we'd obviously like to see all of that capital come from private sources, but detroit still isn't quite there yet, so it is what it is for now.
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  #30  
Old Posted May 4, 2017, 12:48 AM
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