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  #21  
Old Posted May 19, 2017, 3:19 PM
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niwell niwell is offline
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^Ryerson University is re-installing the sign at Yonge Dundas square this summer/fall on one of their buildings. It was something they agreed to when building the new (gorgeous) student centre a few years back but is finally happening.
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  #22  
Old Posted May 19, 2017, 3:25 PM
Don't Be That Guy Don't Be That Guy is offline
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Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
Was Toronto ever that gritty? I mean it's Canada.
Many Canadian cities are surprisingly gritty and lacking in polished charm. Toronto is fun because it's lively and diverse, not because it's pretty.
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  #23  
Old Posted May 19, 2017, 3:26 PM
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well if there was neon hall of fame, that record should be in it! that's entertainment!!
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  #24  
Old Posted May 19, 2017, 9:19 PM
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Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
Was Toronto ever that gritty? I mean it's Canada.

Canada never been gritty none. The Cult of Ignorance made sure there wannen't any.
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  #25  
Old Posted May 19, 2017, 9:47 PM
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Originally Posted by montréaliste View Post
Canada never been gritty none. The Cult of Ignorance made sure there wannen't any.
I thought, per kool maudits post ages ago, porn theaters in Toronto mostly just showed women's studies professors' lectures on female sexuality
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  #26  
Old Posted May 19, 2017, 10:09 PM
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Yeah, Canada is really behind on sex ed - I studied abroad so I have more knowledge about vaginas than the average Canadian.
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  #27  
Old Posted May 20, 2017, 12:07 AM
montréaliste montréaliste is offline
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Yeah, Canada is really behind on sex ed - I studied abroad so I have more knowledge about vaginas than the average Canadian.
Yes. But all you have to do is stay where you're at and study a broad.
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  #28  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 5:11 PM
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That theory, while obviously very biased, is actually quite defensible. New music does suck, even when I try to keep an open mind about it. When I get a chance to talk to younger people about music, they usually talk about how great bands that predate them are, more so than young people did 15-20 years ago.

Music doesn't really anchor a generation as much as it used to, and it's much easier for youth to explore old music through the internet.

Whether bad contemporary music compels people to revisit old favorites, or whether the fact that the subset of youth who care about good music just explore old music, depriving good new artists of an audience and favoring the creation of bad stuff, is a bit of a chicken or egg question.
My favourite music is from the 80s but lots of good stuff from every decade. There's lots of music I enjoy from the past decade: Grimes, Babymetal, Tamaryn, FKA Twigs, P.S. Eliot/Waxahatchee/Alison Crutchfield, Beach House, Voices from the Lake, Danny Brown, Arcade Fire, the list goes on.

We have a rose coloured glasses view of the past because the good stuff becomes more well-known but the bad stuff has become forgotten over time (as it should be). I grew up in the 90s and there was plenty of crappy music back then, but people don't focus on that crappy music, which is good. Just don't look at only the great music and say that represents all of the music back then, because it doesn't.

People always try too hard romanticise the past instead of enjoying the present. Toronto lost its character because the strip clubs are closing? C'mon... that's just pathetic.
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  #29  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 7:08 PM
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Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
and frankly the music today is horrid compared to what it once was which is why most radio stations and public places still play stuff from the 60s, 70s, and 80s.
Having experienced first hand the music of the 60s, 70s, 80s and even the 50s, I can say that I love today's beats, especially the likes of Serhat, Malika Ayane, Milk & Sugar, Inna, Vremya l Steklo, Shantel, Sergey Lazarev, Ishtar, Liviu Hodor and any remix by Offer Nissim. There is plenty of great music out there if you open your arms and ears to Eastern Europe. Now I must get back to shaking my shoulders and wiggling my butt.
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  #30  
Old Posted May 23, 2017, 5:31 AM
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Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
Was Toronto ever that gritty? I mean it's Canada.
Can't figure out if you're being sarcastic. Just in case you weren't: this part of the world was heavily industrialized up until about 1990. They don't call Toronto 'The Big Smoke' for nothing. From century old auto manufacturing in Oshawa in the east, to the steel plants of Hamilton in the west, and factories of every kind in between. Toronto may be a cosmopolitan white collar city today but it's history is blue collar.
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  #31  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 6:13 AM
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A bit of Toronto grit but the cool kind!

The ever-growing Graffiti Alley

Video Link
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  #32  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 2:19 PM
isaidso isaidso is offline
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A lot of Toronto's grit like Honest Ed's is more ramshackle than anything else. I was sad to see it go but it was time for that block to get a boost. Toronto has huge swaths of the city that are functionally obsolete, decrepit, and plain ugly. The bigger issue isn't that it's slowly being replaced but that we're replacing it with sterile boring buildings. We're going from one extreme to the other.
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World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
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  #33  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 4:55 AM
Torontopia Torontopia is offline
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Don't get me started on Honest Ed's, I loved that place! Yeah, it was a terrible building but it was also my favourite store in Toronto! I miss it so much! I have been going there once a month for over 50 years!
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  #34  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 4:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by niwell View Post
^Ryerson University is re-installing the sign at Yonge Dundas square this summer/fall on one of their buildings. It was something they agreed to when building the new (gorgeous) student centre a few years back but is finally happening.
I think they screwed up the sign! You can see the brackets through the thing and I'm PISSED! It does not look like the old Sam's sign, it looks cheap and flimsy, from what I've seen so far!
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  #35  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 9:17 AM
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Most cities are being "gentrified", for better or worse

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Originally Posted by NorthernDancer View Post
San Francisco, New York & L.A. are prime examples (& Portland, Seattle, Denver & Vancouver as well).

San Francisco used to have a substantial working class population, including blacks and Latinos. They are being driven out by rampant real estate speculation by tech neorich. You no longer find many of the "bohemians" & (neo)"beatniks" in North Beach, and certainly no (neo)hippies in Haight-Ashbury. They can't afford it, unless they happen to be rich.

Manhattan used to have lots of "grit", e.g. in the 42nd street area where there was lots of seedy adult entertainment etc. Now we have massive new hotels and condos.

The older eastern & southern parts of downtown L.A. are now "hot" and the poor are being pushed out. Is this good or bad, or something in between? Do the poor and working class have a right to continue to reside in places they can no longer afford? Should money be the only qualification for residency? I don't have the answer, except to observe that increased density might be the only way to acommodate the various people who might want to live in a "hot" city. More skyscrapers, not just for the rich, but for all. Some subsidies might be needed to build the more affordable units.

Last edited by CaliNative; Dec 4, 2017 at 9:36 AM.
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  #36  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 9:51 PM
ue ue is offline
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Can't figure out if you're being sarcastic. Just in case you weren't: this part of the world was heavily industrialized up until about 1990. They don't call Toronto 'The Big Smoke' for nothing. From century old auto manufacturing in Oshawa in the east, to the steel plants of Hamilton in the west, and factories of every kind in between. Toronto may be a cosmopolitan white collar city today but it's history is blue collar.
Ehh...Toronto was way more industrial, that's for sure, but I dunno if I'd categorize its history as more blue collar than white. It still had UofT, the TSX, Bay Street, etc before 1990. It was for sure gritter, though, but it never decayed overall like many American cities or Canadian cities like Hamilton and Windsor.
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