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  #61  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2005, 6:38 PM
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Huntsville's growing up?

Well, I for one would love to see the city skyline picture with all the added buildings. 301 is having the foundation work done right now I drove by the other day and they were drilling and pouring concrete. Hmm, Mr. Shrimscher where are you ? Now would be the perfect time to go ahead and build the Holmes Condo tower. The metro jail is coming along pretty good and is on like the 5th or 6th floor right now. I have a gut feeling the Summit office building will indeed be taller than 128 feet tall. The boom on the crane for the building is 250 feet tall and the building isn't to awfully far from there and they are still on the 6th -7th floor. I would have to guess 160-170 feet maybe. I will see about getting a revised height on that building. Would be nice.
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  #62  
Old Posted Jul 31, 2005, 3:39 AM
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I grew up in Huntsville and it sure has changed in 20 years. Love to see those pics or close airshot.
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  #63  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2005, 12:29 PM
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Huntsville's newest High School

Columbia High School rapidly being readied for the first day of school next week. Even thoug vandals have broken in twice,
stupid punks. It is a beautiful facility located on the edge of Research Park

The $22 million school, named in honor of the space shuttle Columbia, is spread over 131,000 square feet. There is an isolated choral room. The blue bleachers of the main gym will seat 1,600. The practice gym across the hall seats 350.

Crimson drywall can be spotted here and there. The classrooms, most ringed by white block walls, carry the color scheme. Only the cafeteria's waxed floor interrupts with a checkerboard design of gold and white.

From outside, the rounded library walls are probably the school's most distinctive architectural feature.

Offering a sense of space, the ceiling of the library rises two stories. Overhead, poking through the turret's rounded walls, 24 double-pane windows allow the sun from all angles to light up the bookshelves.
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  #64  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2005, 12:36 PM
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Providence Middle School

and to help supply young talent for Columbia,
Providence Elementary and Middle School..


These two schools were built to handle the fast growing west
Huntsville neighborhoods, enrollment at each will be between
300-400, next week but by next year are expected to be at capacity, around 800 students each.
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  #65  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2005, 12:42 PM
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Construction on Canal Begins

Quote:
Originally Posted by HSVTiger
opens the new Monroe Street bridge downtown, this will lead to the new canal being built between the Embassy Suite and VBC.
The rendering says pedestrian bridge but is also for vehicle traffic.
Not shown off the bottom of the page is a new roundabout across from the main branch downtown public library which is to the left.




Credit to Eric Papetti for this photo
The 1,000-foot-long canal and the walkways on each side are considered a 5.5-acre addition to Big Spring International Park by Spencer's administration.

A short section of the canal was built under Monroe Street as part of the Monroe Street and Williams Avenue intersection improvements. The new work will extend the canal between the $40 million Embassy Suites, which is expected to be completed in fall of 2006, and the Von Braun Center South Hall.

The canal will feature two circular basins, two pre-cast bridges similar to the Monroe Street bridge and a stepping-stone bridge. Other features include brick pavement, decorative light fixtures, handrails and park benches.

"This is the beginning of another great opportunity for downtown Huntsville," Spencer said Monday.

The City Council awarded Miller & Miller Inc. a $3.4 million contract to build the canal. The city is supplying $2.4 million of the cost and the federal Economic Development Administration is providing $1 million.

C.B. Miller, chief executive officer of Miller & Miller, said after the ceremony that his company has begun work on the canal and it should be completed in about a year.

The 10-story, 300-room hotel will include a sky walk over the canal from the hotel to the VBC.
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  #66  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2005, 7:18 PM
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Huntsville River History

A little Huntsville, Tennessee River history, involving some famous people.

NewsChannel 19's Amber Moody reports

A man by the name of James Ditto, also known as John, came to North Alabama from North Carolina and settled in what's known today as Ditto Landing.

Jacque Gray says, "He lived peacefully with the Indians for 3 years. He left the Big Spring and came out here and started the ferry. Among his clients were General Andrew Jackson, and his men included D avy Crockett, who had came to fight against the Creek Indians at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend."

Ditto landing became a very popular travelling way for many.

Ed Mitchell says, "Mr. Ditto came in about 1804 and operated a ferry from this bank over there to that bank in Morgan County. It was the only way to cross the river--no bridge at that time."

Mitchell says the river was used for more than just ferrys.

Mitchell says, "This river also presents another mode of transportation. The Indians came down the river by canoe and bargained and battled with the railroad company for years."

Today, Ditto Landing is home to 168 open and covered slips, each offering ample electricity and water.

Mitchell says, "Besides that, this has been developed into an outstanding marina. [It's a] beautiful place, mountains in the background by the river."

Mitchell says the ferry started by John James Ditto served the area well into the 1990's.
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  #67  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2005, 7:38 PM
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Re: West Side development

Quote:
Originally Posted by HSVTiger
another new urbanism project on 115 acres, that will keep most trees, many large hardwoods, and create a park like setting
The still-unnamed neighborhood will feature restaurants, a bookstore, boutique hotel, loft apartments, estate homes and a soaring glass conservatory.J.H. Partners, a Huntsville architectural firm, began working on the design in January.The neighborhood will be next door to Country Day School and around the corner from the Village of Providence, an even larger mixed-use development.

Construction should begin by January
Some more info on this project..it sure does seem like most developers are ready to build, but are waiting on somebody..

By Martin Burkey
DAILY Staff Writer
mburkey@decaturdaily.com · 340-2441

Not content to wait on their proposed Point Mallard Park development to move forward, Decatur insurance broker Rex Rankin III and Madison construction contractor Doug Gooch are relocating their imagination to Huntsville.

They plan to create an upscale "lifestyle" residential and commercial development.

The still unnamed development on Old Monrovia Road would be similar to the nearby Providence lifestyle development, Gooch said. The new development would be to Providence what WaterColor is to neighboring Seaside on the Florida Gulf Coast.

The developers are working with the Huntsville Planning Department to get site-plan approval for a 35-acre tract that would include single-family homes and loft apartments over commercial space with a glass-walled conservatory as the centerpiece of the development. Their plan also includes a 20-acre "retail village" on the north side of Old Monrovia directly across from the 35-acre development.

Developers propose to have the 20-acre site, now outside the city limits, annexed into Huntsville.

"It goes back to a lifestyle experience, borrowing from what's been done over in Providence," Gooch said. "One part of the property is almost touching land owned by Providence, which is across the street to the east. We're taking on a bit more focused group that will appreciate the character and quality of something like a conservatory. Individuals who choose not to have a yard can have a condo. Individuals who still want the comfort of a single-family home have the opportunity to have a traditional home in a very traditional neighborhood."

Huntsville Assistant Planning Director Marie Bostick said she has had preliminary concept discussions with the developers, but has nothing official to begin formal evaluation. She said it will require zoning amendments, a process expected to take five to six months.

Gooch estimated the development, created by J.H. Partners in Huntsville, would have 60 to 70 single-family home lots and about 50 to 100 loft apartments. Apartments would range from 1,200 to 1,800 square feet. Single-family homes would range from 2,200 to 4,000 square feet. Three main commercial buildings will contain 18, nine and five rental commercial spaces beneath loft apartments.

The developers will finance their development. They are waiting for their architects to provide cost estimates for the development and estimated prices for rental and single-family homes, Gooch said.

Gooch described the design concept as late 19th, early 20th century.

"It's a lifestyle community, so you could get up on Sunday, walk down to a Starbucks-type coffee shop, and enjoy the paper and a cup of coffee," he said.

The conservatory will set the development apart from anything in North Alabama, Gooch said. The conservatory would be capable of hosting catered events and concerts, and serve as an educational center.

The design of mixed-use commercial area, Gooch noted, is much like the developers' "Village" area of their RiverCountry at Point Mallard project. Located at the south end of Point Mallard, the Village area would have restaurants, shops and loft apartments, an inn and galleries.

"The greenhouse structure literally glows at night, forming a beacon to the surrounding community," Gooch said. "We anticipated the same kind of glass structure for the Point Mallard convention center hotel because of the presence on the riverfront."

In the Huntsville project, Gooch said he hopes to get approval and break ground this fall.

Rankin and Gooch proposed a $256 million program last year to privatize most of Point Mallard park with the addition of about 40 attractions such as hotels, tournament golf course, rental cottages, shops, yacht harbor, sports fields and attractions. They are seeking approval from city, state and federal officials to begin work on the project.
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  #68  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2005, 4:10 AM
kevinranders kevinranders is offline
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Hey guys - I used to live in Huntsville - Five Points to be exact - while I was in grad. school at UAH

When I left there were talks of a project being built around the park downtown. Are there any updates as to this? (I think I may be behind the times)

Last edited by kevinranders; Aug 6, 2005 at 4:56 AM.
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  #69  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2005, 4:54 AM
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Huntsville is a cool town! I am glad to see it growing. I love to see the south grow.
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  #70  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2005, 4:51 PM
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Hmm ?

You are referring to Electric Avenue? That project was scrapped and along came Big Spring Summit office tower which is being topped out. Also, further along the Big Spring will also be a 4 story building ( Big Spring Summit is 8 stories 130') which will include condos and retail. Triad is the main force behind building the new complex along the park. By the way the birthday party for Huntsville last night was really nice. The $7,500 fireworks display was one of the nicest display I've ever seen. The new interactive water park is a wonderful addition to the downtown area also.
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  #71  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2005, 5:00 PM
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Wow...I'm really impressed by the Ele. School and the Huntsville Hospital. Great designs! Very classy.
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  #72  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2005, 7:47 PM
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$256 million for improvements at Point Mallard ?

Subdivisions with giant glowing greenhouses ?

Way to go, Huntsville !!!
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  #73  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2005, 12:48 PM
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BioTech Boom

Huntsville, the leader in space and missile defense now strives
to do the same in biotech, new campus at Research Park.

Big plans for biotech Hudson-led institute promises 900 jobs for city
Tuesday, August 09, 2005
By BRIAN LAWSON
Times Business Writer brianl@htimes.com
Nonprofit is backed by $130 million inprivate, state funds

Huntsville will be the home of a major new biotechnology research institute, led by industry pioneer Jim Hudson and backed by $80 million in private contributions and a $50 million state investment.

At a luncheon today, Gov. Bob Riley, who has called for biotech development in Alabama since he first ran for governor, will announce the establishment of the nonprofit Hudson-Alpha Institute for Biotechnology.
"With a $50 million commitment from the state, we're gaining $80 million in private investments that together will help create about 900 direct new jobs," Riley said. "We are actively and aggressively positioning Alabama to become a worldwide leader in biotech research and one of the premier places in the nation for these high-paying jobs that can't be exported overseas."

Researchers in the biotech field often possess both a medical degree and a Ph.D. and want to work around the world with top researchers, the kind the institute hopes to attract.

Hudson, 63, established Huntsville's biotech industry with his company, Research Genetics, which he founded in 1987 and sold in 2000. He said the institute project - a resurrection of a long-held idea - began to move forward in May 2004 after significant amounts of cash were raised from private donors. The group approached Riley, seeking state support. Hudson said Riley was immediately receptive and made the deal possible.

"This is the most exciting thing I've been involved with in my lifetime," Hudson said. "This is going to be unique. It will be an economic development engine as much as a true research facility. We'll have eight scientific teams, housed in the same building with eight biotech companies."

Hudson said the private donors who generated the $80 million commitment have asked not to be identified. The donors are not investors seeking a return, he said.

While the institute and its future researchers will face plenty of competition for grant dollars, Hudson said the biotech field is exploding with the mapping of the human genome, and there are plenty of "niches available to become a dominant player."

The institute will create a campus-like environment on 120 acres in Cummings Research Park. It will include a 260,000-square-foot main building that will house biotech companies and facilities for eight teams of institute-hired scientists, Hudson said.

Construction is scheduled to begin this winter, and organizers hope to open the institute in fall 2007. The institute will start with 500 to 600 people working in its facility and expects an annual payroll of $37 million by the end of 2008.

At full capacity, the institute is expected to employ 900. The property sold to it by the City of Huntsville is large enough to accommodate new buildings for companies that outgrow their space in the institute. Hudson estimates the overall campus could employ 1,600 within 10 years with an annual payroll of $83 million.

U.S. Rep. Bud Cramer, D-Huntsville, who helped negotiate the agreement between the institute and state officials, said the project could be the beginning of redefining Alabama's economy.

"I think it's an extraordinary opportunity for our state to define a future for itself that hasn't been defined so far," Cramer said. "This brings together assets from around the state of Alabama. And it allows us to enter an elite number of centers around the county like this. That will allow us to attract companies and scientists and projects beyond anything we've seen in North Alabama."

Building a future

The University of Alabama in Huntsville biotechnology program Web site defines biotechnology as "the safe study and manipulation of biological molecules for development of products or techniques for medical and industrial application."

Supporters of the project said Huntsville could see the same kind of biotech industry form around the institute as has been the case in San Diego in connection with the Scripps Institute there and in Palo Alto, Calif., near Stanford University.
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  #74  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2005, 12:56 PM
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Re: Hmm ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by HSV79
You are referring to Electric Avenue? That project was scrapped and along came Big Spring Summit office tower which is being topped out. Also, further along the Big Spring will also be a 4 story building ( Big Spring Summit is 8 stories 130') which will include condos and retail. Triad is the main force behind building the new complex along the park. By the way the birthday party for Huntsville last night was really nice. The $7,500 fireworks display was one of the nicest display I've ever seen. The new interactive water park is a wonderful addition to the downtown area also.
Yes that is exactly what I was referring too - it sounds awesome. Why did they scrap it? Funding fall through??
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  #75  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2005, 3:04 PM
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Renderings soon

This campus will consist of a 4 story HQ building and several
stand alone buildings built in a park like setting, right near
the new Columbia High School. I believe this is the Governors
third or fourth visit in the last couple months to announce
developments.

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. Governor Bob Riley visits Huntsville today to announce a new biotechnology research center that could create up to 900 new jobs.

Riley, a supporter of the biotech industry, will discuss the nonprofit Hudson-Alpha Institute at a luncheon.

In the recent special session, the Legislature approved 50 (m) million dollars in tax breaks for Hudson-Alpha, which has secured another 80 (m) million dollars from private donors.

The center will focus on D-N-A research.

Stations: Governor will make economic development announcement at 12:30 p-m, Von Braun Center, North Hall.
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  #76  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2005, 3:20 PM
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Nuclear/ Scottsboro

Another possible mega project in the making

TVA, government working for new start

By Ken Bonner
The Daily Sentinel Page 1 of 2 | Next
Single-Page View

Published August 8, 2005

Jackson County officials should know by October 1 if NuStart Energy Development, LLC intends to locate a new generation nuclear facility at TVA’s Bellefonte Nuclear Plant site near Hollywood.

NuStart official Garry Miller said Thursday that the eight company consortium will decide by the end of September if Bellefonte is one of their choices for either a Westinghouse Advance Passive 1000 Reactor or a General Electric Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor. The site near Hollywood is one of six finalists. Other potential sites are located in La,. Md., Miss., N.Y. and S.C.

If built, the reactors would be the first new ones in the United States in 30 years. Currently 23 nuclear facilities are under construction worldwide.

While the state currently cannot legally provide tax abatements, credits and other incentives to utility companies it, along with local officials, is trying to meet an August 15 deadline to complete a package encouraging the consortium to locate a facility at Bellefonte. Governmental entities are working to meet the consortium’s request for proposal, covering concerns such as available infrastructure, education, workforce availability, training and outlining community support for the project.

“My job is to put together a response to your request,” Neal Wade, Director of the Alabama Development Office told NuStart representatives in a meeting Thursday. “This is something we want in this state. We’ll put together an aggressive response.”

State Senator Lowell Barron said he would work diligently to see that the Alabama Legislature passes legislation allowing the state to provide a first rate incentive package to the consortium.

“We’ll step up to the plate big time to support this facility,” he said. “We’ll put the incentives in place, the support in place. There’s no place in the U.S. that’s a better place to do business than North Alabama and Jackson County.”

Eight utility companies comprise the NuStart consortium. They are: Constellation Energy, Duke Energy, EDF International North America, Entergy Nuclear, Exelon Generation, Florida Power and Light Company, Progress Energy and the Southern Company.

TVA participates in the group through in-kind services. GE and Westinghouse are involved as reactor designers and manufacturers.

Tom Kilgore, President and COO of TVA said there are four reasons NuStart should choose Bellefonte to build a nuclear plant. “I call them the four C’s,” he said of commitment, community, construction and connections.

“TVA is committed,” Kilgore stated. He said the community supports the project and that construction would be easier and less costly because of the transmission switchyard and other infrastructure in place at the facility. Finally he called the utility’s direct connection to four members of the consortium a plus.

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  #77  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2005, 4:40 PM
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UAB a little concerned

Quote:
Originally Posted by HSVTiger
Huntsville, the leader in space and missile defense now strives
to do the same in biotech, new campus at Research Park.

Big plans for biotech Hudson-led institute promises 900 jobs for city
Tuesday, August 09, 2005
By BRIAN LAWSON
Times Business Writer brianl@htimes.com
Nonprofit is backed by $130 million inprivate, state funds

Huntsville will be the home of a major new biotechnology research institute, led by industry pioneer Jim Hudson and backed by $80 million in private contributions and a $50 million state investment.

At a luncheon today, Gov. Bob Riley, who has called for biotech development in Alabama since he first ran for governor, will announce the establishment of the nonprofit Hudson-Alpha Institute for Biotechnology.
"With a $50 million commitment from the state, we're gaining $80 million in private investments that together will help create about 900 direct new jobs," Riley said. "We are actively and aggressively positioning Alabama to become a worldwide leader in biotech research and one of the premier places in the nation for these high-paying jobs that can't be exported overseas."

Researchers in the biotech field often possess both a medical degree and a Ph.D. and want to work around the world with top researchers, the kind the institute hopes to attract.

Hudson, 63, established Huntsville's biotech industry with his company, Research Genetics, which he founded in 1987 and sold in 2000. He said the institute project - a resurrection of a long-held idea - began to move forward in May 2004 after significant amounts of cash were raised from private donors. The group approached Riley, seeking state support. Hudson said Riley was immediately receptive and made the deal possible.

"This is the most exciting thing I've been involved with in my lifetime," Hudson said. "This is going to be unique. It will be an economic development engine as much as a true research facility. We'll have eight scientific teams, housed in the same building with eight biotech companies."

Hudson said the private donors who generated the $80 million commitment have asked not to be identified. The donors are not investors seeking a return, he said.

While the institute and its future researchers will face plenty of competition for grant dollars, Hudson said the biotech field is exploding with the mapping of the human genome, and there are plenty of "niches available to become a dominant player."

The institute will create a campus-like environment on 120 acres in Cummings Research Park. It will include a 260,000-square-foot main building that will house biotech companies and facilities for eight teams of institute-hired scientists, Hudson said.

Construction is scheduled to begin this winter, and organizers hope to open the institute in fall 2007. The institute will start with 500 to 600 people working in its facility and expects an annual payroll of $37 million by the end of 2008.

At full capacity, the institute is expected to employ 900. The property sold to it by the City of Huntsville is large enough to accommodate new buildings for companies that outgrow their space in the institute. Hudson estimates the overall campus could employ 1,600 within 10 years with an annual payroll of $83 million.

U.S. Rep. Bud Cramer, D-Huntsville, who helped negotiate the agreement between the institute and state officials, said the project could be the beginning of redefining Alabama's economy.

"I think it's an extraordinary opportunity for our state to define a future for itself that hasn't been defined so far," Cramer said. "This brings together assets from around the state of Alabama. And it allows us to enter an elite number of centers around the county like this. That will allow us to attract companies and scientists and projects beyond anything we've seen in North Alabama."

Building a future

The University of Alabama in Huntsville biotechnology program Web site defines biotechnology as "the safe study and manipulation of biological molecules for development of products or techniques for medical and industrial application."

Supporters of the project said Huntsville could see the same kind of biotech industry form around the institute as has been the case in San Diego in connection with the Scripps Institute there and in Palo Alto, Calif., near Stanford University.
With Huntsville's 80 million PRIVATE investment they can't say much. This will enhance UAB's great work as well..
On Monday, a UAB spokeswoman focused on the state and federal support UAB receives without acknowledging the move in Huntsville.

"At UAB, we have received wonderful support from our elected officials," said Dale Turnbough, associate vice president of public relations and marketing at UAB. "In particular, Senator (Richard) Shelby and Governor Riley have shared our vision for the role UAB can play in our state's continued economic development through the expansion of our biomedical research programs. We look forward to proving them right by sustaining our record of accomplishment in research and technology transfer."

Comparisons with UAB:

Still, UAB had to lobby hard for the $25 million it received for its $90 million research facility now under construction. When Shelby, R-Ala., secured an additional $50 million for UAB, it made the project a reality.

The ease with which Huntsville is getting twice the incentives from the state with less of an existing biotechnology cluster than Birmingham caused a number of economic development and elected officials to raise concerns when the proposal was introduced last year.

"I think UAB has had to fight long and hard for what they've got," vonCannon said. "That does not need to be dismissed in any way. Over the years, UAB has been successful in bringing so many federal dollars in the state."

VonCannon said now that the state has shown it recognizes the value of investing in biotech, UAB will find it easier to tap into state dollars in the future.

"We need to ensure the state is spreading the dollars out to the areas where it can provide the most return and I have to trust the governor is doing that," he said.
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  #78  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2005, 7:54 PM
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Electric Avenue..

This project was to be funded by Jim Hudson and his wife Susie. This project was to be where the Big Spring Summit building is now. It would have been condos in a 14 storey tower and a series of smaller buildings and restaurants along side the lagoon downtown. The project was pretty much shot down due to cost and the NIMBY'S in town. Now for some other news....The Summit office building will include a pair of restaurants and the rest will be office space. The building is topped out and the next phase which includes condos will soon get underway hopefully. The new metro jail is on the 5th / 6th floor and coming along slowly. The Saturn V is being refurbed and will be moved hopefully in the next few months to its new home inside the new welcome building at the Space & Rocket Center. Bridge Street all 100 acres have been cleared and construction is well underway as well as the 2 lakes that will serve as the center piece.
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  #79  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2005, 8:51 PM
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Hudson Alpha Biotech renderings

Regarding the above posts^^^^^
This is no small project, the impact could be on the scale of an
automotive plant over the next 10 years.



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  #80  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2005, 12:48 PM
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Airport traffic continues up

Passenger traffic at Huntsville International Airport for the year through July is ahead of the 2004 count.

The number of passengers at the airport through July was 755,192, up 12.9 percent over the same period in 2004, according to figures released Tuesday at a meeting of the Huntsville-Madison County Airport Authority.
"I think we will have another record year if the (passenger growth) trend continues, and we anticipate that trend continuing," said Rick Tucker, the airport's executive director.

Tucker told authority members that the Senate Appropriations Committee last month approved its version of a spending bill for fiscal year 2006 for agencies including the Federal Aviation Administration. The bill directs the FAA to give priority consideration to discretionary grant money for building a new taxiway at Huntsville International Airport.

From Huntsville Times
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