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  #3101  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 2:07 PM
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delts145 delts145 is offline
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Brought this over from the Salt Lake thread, where they were posting prolifically about it. Reading some of the posts it would almost seem as if many are unaware of the major ongoing cleanup of the carp, which are the major historical issue. That cleanup is beginning to show some excellent results now.

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Originally Posted by RC14 View Post
I have mixed feelings about this project... I also like the ambition of this project although, I agree it makes it very unrealistic.
However, I don't want the lake to become criss crossed with causways like the Great Salt Lake. I think the island being proposed looks much too large. I would prefer most of the lake remain natural as it was before it became polluted.

I agree RC14. Criss crossing the lake with causeways would be a big and visually ugly mistake. As the population of the Wasatch Front grows the Lake will become an extremely valuable recreation resource. Also, the shoreline value will only continue to climb into the stratosphere. They don't need to stick an island in the middle of the Lake in order to fund its continuing clean up. A lot of progress is already being made to resolve its major reasons for decline this past century. As everyone knows the major issue has been the carp population. Carp have destroyed the natural lake bottom vegetation and habitat. Here's a link to one of the more recent 2017 articles about the ongoing effort and success in removing the carp issue.

Regarding algae blooms, which is the other major issue. Algae blooms are a nation wide problem. It would seem the major culprit is a result of the waste water treatment plants release into the lake of treated waste water. The good news is a lot of heads are involved on a national level to resolve the problem.

After many years, Utah Lake's carp removal project starting to see some desired results

Katie England, Daily Herald - http://www.heraldextra.com/news/loca...23385f3af.html

...Vegetation monitoring has been a part of the project all along, and for years none of the desired type of plants were found. “That all changed last spring when we went out and started to find some of these submerged vegetation beds out in the lake,” Mills said...

...More than 25 million pounds of removed carp and $4.9 million later, biologists are already beginning to see some of those desired results — including the return of vegetation crucial to the June suckers’ continued survival.
The original goal was to remove 5 million pounds of carp each year in order to reduce the population enough for the vegetation to come back, said Mike Mills, coordinator for the June sucker recovery program. Though the 5 million per year goal has never quite been reached, the density of the carp population in the lake has dropped drastically...
...Carp are responsible for that lack of habitat because of the way they feed off the bottom of the lake. They tear up the bottom as they feed, destroying the underwater plant life, like pond weed and duck weed that provide refuge habitat for young June suckers...
...Vegetation monitoring has been a part of the project all along, and for years none of the desired type of plants were found. “That all changed last spring when we went out and started to find some of these submerged vegetation beds out in the lake,” Mills said...


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  #3102  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2018, 9:17 AM
bob rulz bob rulz is offline
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I'm all for continued restoration of the lake, but how is an inhabited artificial island in the middle of it going to help with that?
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  #3103  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2018, 11:05 AM
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You've got me bob. Perhaps, they think there would be a lot of profit generated from the sale and development of the land, plus taxes etc. I would much rather the lake be dredged of 40 to 80 feet of silt in different areas, making a good portion of it much deeper. I know in the past they've had serious discussion about dredging it, but the cost can be prohibitive. I think the decision was to wait until the population of the metro increased to the point that it could support a major dredging effort. A Lake like Utah Lake in the middle of a major metro area can become a huge multiple multi-billion dollar resource.

A while ago I was over on the west side, around the new housing areas of Saratoga Springs. The views looking back at the Lake, Timp. and the Wasatch were breathtaking.
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  #3104  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2018, 12:45 PM
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Just in case any of you guys who frequent this thread regularly, but not the SLC Thread, we are discussing bringing a small number of the threads together. I started this particular thread, and would have no problem with bringing it under the Provo Thread. We could have Viperlord simply rename the Provo Thread to something like the "Provo MSA Development Thread" I would be more than happy to bring much of the Ut. Valley info. over onto the newly named Provo MSA Thread, since this forum is one of my more involved hobbies. Anyway, don't worry about losing valuable Ut. Valley/Lehi info. I'm a BIG proponent of Utah Valley development, particularly Northern Utah Valley, where I grew up.

Another aspect that I would like you guys to help me out with. How many of you are BYU or UVU students right now? Or have, and are still maintaining close contact with the schools and or professors. I'm particularly interested in talking with those professors who are very involved in the aspects of urban planning for Utah Valley. I would like to recruit them as forum members, and also have them request that their students maintain an active presence for say the duration of their semester in that particular class. Also, I will be talking with reporters such as Genelle Pugmire of the Herald, and trying to recruit people such as her, who report regularly on Valley developments. It just makes so much sense to have these people involved. After all they're as big or bigger development nerds than we are...LOL.
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  #3105  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2018, 4:04 PM
Liberty Wellsian Liberty Wellsian is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
You've got me bob. Perhaps, they think there would be a lot of profit generated from the sale and development of the land, plus taxes etc. I would much rather the lake be dredged of 40 to 80 feet of silt in different areas, making a good portion of it much deeper. I know in the past they've had serious discussion about dredging it, but the cost can be prohibitive. I think the decision was to wait until the population of the metro increased to the point that it could support a major dredging effort. A Lake like Utah Lake in the middle of a major metro area can become a huge multiple multi-billion dollar resource.

A while ago I was over on the west side, around the new housing areas of Saratoga Springs. The views looking back at the Lake, Timp. and the Wasatch were breathtaking.
The Lake is crazy shallow like 6-8 feet for much of it. Where does all that mud and rock go. How do you preserve the shoreline after dredging? Artificial islands. Honestly it would probably be cheaper to dredge and keep the material in the lake rather than haul it out. Then if you sale that land you can recuperate costs of dredging. I honestly don't think it's that pie in the sky or even a bad idea but it still will never happen.
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  #3106  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:39 PM
bob rulz bob rulz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liberty Wellsian View Post
The Lake is crazy shallow like 6-8 feet for much of it. Where does all that mud and rock go. How do you preserve the shoreline after dredging? Artificial islands. Honestly it would probably be cheaper to dredge and keep the material in the lake rather than haul it out. Then if you sale that land you can recuperate costs of dredging. I honestly don't think it's that pie in the sky or even a bad idea but it still will never happen.
Well I get the idea of artificial islands. But why put residential developments on it? What is the point? Is that only to recoup the cost? Wouldn't that just dramatically increase the chances of harming the natural environment of the lake again? There's a good reason why Antelope Island has been closed off to development.

Also, any kind of causeway just seems like a terrible idea.

Sure, dredge the lake and put some artificial islands in. But keep the islands free of development and leave causeways out of it.
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  #3107  
Old Posted Today, 4:39 AM
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