HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Mountain West

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #21  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2006, 1:36 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Thumbs up The Terrace, "Gateway on massive steroids"

Daily Herald

Janelle Leatherwood is pleased.

A Kindermusic instructor teaching out of her Hunter Chase home, she said her property has increased over $30,000 in value, since they purchased it 18 months ago and she expects it will increase even more with the planned development of The Terrace.

"I'm excited about (The Terrace)," she said. "I just wish it was here now instead of in 2008."

Dubbed "a cross between the Gateway and the Shops at the Riverwoods on massive steroids" by Steven Roll, Lehi Area Chamber of Commerce member, the four million plus square feet of retail space and 150-acre development will be located southeast of Cabela's just off of SR 92. Initial plans include business parks, recreation space, a performing and cultural arts center, restaurants and cinemas. Oh, and plenty of retail shopping for the high-end and moderate income consumer.

With statewide media broadcasting the announcement and state dignitaries and other guest officials joining in the accolades for the lates commercial feather in Lehi's cap one would suppose Lehi residents, like Leatherwood, would be excited about the project. But there is a more practical side inherent in some Lehi consumers.

"I'm more excited about Costco, because that's where I go shopping," Bebbie Bartlett said. "It does mean more revenue to Lehi, more taxes. Maybe this will get our roads built." (Costco, a consumer discount club, has just opened
across from the American Fork, "The Meadows" on State Street and is located adjacement to a new Lowe's).

"Wow, for me I'd be happy about it: I've been to the Gateway once or twice," said former Lehi resident Karli Poyfair, now of Orem. "I'm pretty much pro shopping. Not having to go to Salt Lake would be fun

Last edited by delts145; Oct 13, 2006 at 5:44 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #22  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2006, 1:39 PM
SLCFly'n SLCFly'n is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: slc
Posts: 12
Map of UVRMC

Map of the hospital in Provo and the recent add-ons

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #23  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2006, 2:15 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Great Pic's SLC'FLY'N



AGAIN,Great Pic's Slc'fly'n !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Last edited by delts145; Oct 14, 2006 at 2:17 PM. Reason: additional comment
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #24  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2006, 6:38 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Thumbs up Canopy breaks ground for fifth building in Lindon

LINDON- Canopy Properties broke ground for a 95,000-square-foot office building at 331 S. 670 West in Lindon.

The $10 million, three-story building, called Canopy V, is expected to be ready for occupancy in December 2007

Canopy operates four other office buildings on its Lindon campus and has about 20 additional acres that can be used for expansion.

Canopy Ventures provides venture funding, while Canopy Properties provides office space.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #25  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2006, 12:29 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Thumbs up Intel/micron Expanding Big Time

The Daily Herald
Cathy Allred

Since the announcement of the IM Flash technologies venture between Micron and Intel in March, the environment of the 2,000-acre Lehi campus has changed significantly from what it used to be - empty lots and silent halls.

Steeped in a flurry of activity, the plant is nearing completion and is at 53 percent of its employment target - 1,850 workers by spring 2007.

The number of new hires changes daily said Rod Morgan, IM Flash co-chief executive officer, as does the number of contractors. There are about 2,000 contractors currently

"It's geen pretty exciting to come together with Intel," Morgan said. "There's quite a bit of stuff going on right now."

Initially a 20-building fabrication plant built for Micron's microchip production in 1997, much of it was left unfinished and remained hauntingly empty in recent years because of changing dynamics in the semiconductor industry.

But the Lehi plant is now the international headquarters for IM Flash Technologies and its NAND Flash memory production using nanotechnology to create NAND memory products, which are electrically re-writeable, non-volatile semiconductor devices that retain memory content when power is turned off.

"I went after this one. This to me is just a great opportunity for the two companies," David Baglee, IM Flash co-chief executive officer, said. "It's the fastest semiconductor business there is and I wanted to be a part of it."

Expectations for NAND memory products, which are used in cell phones, MP3 players, computers, digital cameras, flash drives and handhelds, is more than $14.8 billion in 2006, up 40 percent from 2005. With two of the largest semiconductor companies joining forces, their total investment will be upwards of $5 billion. One of the largest single private sector investments in Utah, IM Flash is expected to provide $1.1 billion in total salary at the Lehi plant, with annual incomes averaging $50,000 per employee.

Stan Lockhart, who has been with Micron since the plant's inception, said he is thrilled with its latest developments.

''The IM Flash corporate headquarters here in Utah County gives us the opportunity to realize the full potential of our Lehi site as a major NAND manufacturing facility. It also shows a long-tem commitment to Utah on the part of Micron and Intel," he said.

Most of the construction is going on inside the facility. The mile-long corridor at IM Flash is bustling with foot traffic, with noise of saws, hammers and drills echoing along the halls. Ducts, plumbing and wiring are being installed along with walls, a lot of walls.

The fabricating clean room is under wraps-- covered with a thick opaque plastic. Workers have to suit up in static-free white coveralls, caps and gloves before entering the room. They are installing the air conditioning system in a adjoining room, and duct tape fencing, and gates guide visitors along the construction route.

It's just a hub of activity, "Lockhard said. "All of this is preparing for what is going to go on in the fabricating room."

West of 22 large buildings at the site, a construction village of portable trailers has been brought in, and a temporary 200-man cafeteria tent behind the buildings feeds a small army of workers. A storage building with its metal frame is being built to the norteast. Because the fabrication of NAND semiconductors needs to be done in a clean enviroment, a one-story , 25,000-square-foot warehouse capable of storing a three- to seven-day supply of chemicals is being built.

The IM Flash headquarters is only part of the economic growth in north Lehi. Below its campus, farm fields are quickly disappearing with homes popping up south of State Road 92. Growth is nearing the 2,000- acre buffer of cheat grass.

Part; of what has been termed "the billion dollar mile" by Kim Struthers, Lehi city planner, IM Flash Technologies is bordered on the south and west by two mammoth planned communities expected ;to attract more than 12,000 residents, or one quarter of Lehi's existing population. Each residential/commercial project comes with its own unique amenities-- Traverse Mountain's The Terrace mall and Cabela's and Ivory Ridge's tennis club, water facility and reception center.

The plant built by Micron in 1995 has facilitated much of the growth by funding the building of Lehi's ;infrastructure, he said.

"IM Flash Technologies will be investing millions of dollars," Struthers said. "This will create a huge employment center for those in Lehi."

If you have'nt been yet.

p.s. Wow, it's amazing to drive along highway 92 from I-15 to the mouth of American Fork Canyon. No where is the incredible growth of the Wasatch Front more evident on one highway. If any of you out there have some extra time today take a Sunday drive. Exit I-15 at the Alpine/Highland exit,(just after you go over the Point of the Mountain). Head east along highway 92, toward the mouth of Am. Fork Canyon. You'll be challenged to take in all of the sights of growth on both sides of the highway. Literally billion's of dollars in commercial and residential in the pipeline. Be sure to take a little extra time to continue on up American Fork Canyon and over the Alpine Loop.(Take a few extra dollars for the Canyon. They charge a toll, which keeps up the Canyons itself,campgrounds,lakes,etc. Looks like it's going to snow here in the next 48 hours, so get it done today. This Canyon is literally one of the most beautiful in the world, "you'll feel like a tourist in Manhattan for the first time." You'll proceed up and over the loop and down into Sundance and Provo Canyon's. Take a moment to stop and walk around the Sundance resort, Again, the views are among the most beautiful in the world. If you still have time you may want to take a left when you come to the Provo Canyon highway. If you have'nt seen Midway yet, it's worth a look for all development geeks. Then you will move on to Park City and down I-80 to Salt Lake.

Last edited by delts145; Oct 15, 2006 at 1:14 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #26  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2006, 11:05 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Post Hospital eyes additional ideas for growth

SLCFly'n posted some great pics on the previous page of the hospital expansion currently under construction in Provo. This article deals with some of the additional expansion in the works,

Deseret Morning News
Tad Walch and Laura Hancock

PROVO - Utah Valley Regional Medical Center needs elbow room, and hospital managers are looking at interesting options that would change the face of Provo High School to fill short-term needs at UVRMC.

UVRMC is growing rapidly in a landlocked location in the middle of a population boom.. By 2020, the hospital projects 662,000 residents in Utah County,(a figure considered by many experts as far to conservative), up from 454,000 residents in 2005.

Parking is already a problem without additional expansion. Some employees are grumbling about parking miles away and catching hospital shuttles to work while the hospital builds a new outpatient clinic on the northeast corner of the block.

The construction of a parking terrace is evidence of expansion.

"They recognize they are in an urban setting and need to go up," Provo City Council chairman George Stewart said. "They need parking to do that."

IHC recently purchased an auto parts store that could make room for an outpaitent procedures building and physician office space, said Bryant Larsen, the hospital's director of community relations.

UVRMC needs more parking space and is looking south of 940 North, its southern boundary. In the past 15 years, IHC has purchased 13 of 17 homes in the block to the south, down to 880 North.

"We're negotiating on the remaining four," Larsen said.

The city Planning Commission would have to rezone the two rows of houses before IHC could pave over the land. Larsen said that IHC prefers parking lots to terraces because they are cheaper to build. "2020 is kind of our planning window," Larsen said.

Neighbors also prefer a parking lot to a parking garage, so IHC is looking east, too, specifically Fox Field at Provo High, the wide-open space between the hospital and high school, Larsen said. Fox Field is now home to high school soccer and softball games.

However, Provo School District officials, in informal talks with management at the nonprofit hospital group, said it will cost millions for the field.

"We have had some casual conversations, and our reply to (IHC) is Fox Field is always part of Provo High," Provo School District business manager Kerry Smith said. "You can't take it without all of Provo (High School), and the only way they'd ever consider (selling the high school is) they'd have to pay enough money to rebuild the high school on our land out west."

The district owns property near Utah Lake where a new high school could be built. High schools cost about $40 million to build.

The UVRMC campus is relatively tiny at 23 acres. IHC's McKay-Dee Hospital in Ogden covers 62 acres and has services, patients and staff. IHC's new hospital in Murray is 80 acres, but it is larger than the Ogden and Provo hospitals, Larsen said.

In Provo there is no room for the hospital on the north because UVRMC's last bout of growth swallowed up all the territory to Bulldog Boulevard, or 1230 North, a busy street that acts as a natural boundary. To the west across busy 500 West are two IHC buildings: an employee day-care and a guest hotel for patients and their families. Other medical buildings belong to the Central Utah Clinic, which is not affiliated with UVRMC.

City leaders would like to see the hospital continue to grow.

"A lot of people complain because it is a non-taxable entity, but the hospital is a tremendous amenity to the community," Stewart said. "Companies look at schools, hospitals and parks and recreation opportunities for employees when they pick locations."

Stewart also said expansion in the area around the hospital is best.

"Otherwise they'd have to look off-site. That would be sad because it's great to have everything together."

Last edited by delts145; Oct 16, 2006 at 11:05 AM. Reason: additional comment
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #27  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2006, 11:28 AM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Post Midtown village has had bumps, but owner says most supportive,

leebuddy has posted some great pics on the previous page dealing with this project,

Deseret News,

By Sara Israelsen
Deseret Morning News

OREM — Neighborhood reactions to a mixed-use development with living-and-shopping options shooting skyward on Orem's State Street are just that — mixed.


Midtown Village — with three wings, each eight stories high — is touted by developers as a project much like Salt Lake's Gateway that will bring more shopping, downtown living and entertainment to the city.


David Runnells, a part owner, says he thinks most neighbors are "excited about not only the project bringing business" but also a new look on State Street.


And, he says, the value of property will increase as a result of the project.


Construction of Midtown Village hasn't been without a few bumps — such as financing delays that left gaping holes on State Street for almost two years, as well as noisy construction equipment during the early morning hours. While all that will pass, some business owners are also worried about future impacts the project will have on the area.


"We're a little concerned about the traffic, especially on Orem Boulevard because that is a narrow street," said Pamela Harrison, who, with her husband Rex, owns Gunnies Sporting Goods and Western Wear and the Gunnies Plaza, 396 S. State. "I haven't heard any plans to address that."


Before the project began, the city required a traffic study to look at Midtown's potential impact to State Street and Orem Boulevard, said Stanford Sainsbury, director of Orem City Development Services. The city denied two of the proposed exits then gave the project the go-ahead.


Based on a traffic study comparing the current levels of service with the completed project and projections for 2010, the "grades" assigned to the roads remain about the same.


Currently, the delay at the traffic light at the 400 South and State Street intersection is 16.5 seconds per vehicle at the noon peak hour and 48.2 seconds during rush hour. With the Midtown traffic added, delays would only increase by one second at noon and three seconds at rush hour. Future time increase projections are almost identical.



Construction on the Midtown Village project in Orem is expected to be complete by January 2008.

Keith Johnson, Deseret Morning News
Noise has also been a bit of a concern, with large construction equipment banging and clanking early in the morning, but Runnells said they have tried to keep all the neighbors posted with what's going on and at what time.


The Harrisons have heard the noise and dealt with a few power outages they think might have been caused by the construction. While not anti-Midtown, they're just a bit frustrated with how the project began.


"There's just a lot of misrepresentation of what they owned and what their plans were and when they were going to complete the project," Harrison said. "It's way behind schedule."


And, originally, the Harrisons said they were told the project would go all the way to 400 S. State — to their property.


That won't happen because contract talks fell through and the western-wear store on the property decided to stay put.


Some people are confused by the nearby construction, however.


"People think we're moving," Pamela Harrison said. "(Midtown hasn't) bought us. We like our location. We plan on being here."


Nearby, Kim Boun, office manager of CLP Skill Trade Solutions, a construction-staffing business, said she is excited about the new addition to the city. Midtown Village is scheduled for completion by January 2008.


"(People) will be visually seeing CLP when they're stopping by (Midtown). It's kind of like a Wal-Mart effect — a lot of stores will place themselves next to Wal-Mart just for free advertising."


"I can't imagine it not being positive for us," said Joey Leyba, senior technician and manager of the Orem Tunex, 184 S. State. "People can go there and shop, drop their car off here."


Many Tunex customers drop off their cars then walk to nearby stores, Leyba said. With a destination spot so close, it may bring more cars to the shop.


So until 2008, cranes will continue to frame the Orem skyline as they piece together the steel addition to State Street.


"It seems like they're taking an awfully long time," said Dean Phelps, manager of Napa Auto Parts at 110 E. 400 South. "I'd like to see it done. It might be a good thing for us, draw more traffic to us.

Last edited by delts145; Oct 16, 2006 at 11:35 AM. Reason: additional comment
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #28  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2006, 11:30 AM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Wal-Mart expanding into Saratoga Springs,

Wednesday, October 11, 2006
Daily Herald - Provo


CATHY ALLRED - North County Staff
Ground has not been broken yet, but Wal-Mart Corporation is still planning on building a Super Wal-Mart at the Saratoga Springs commercial crossroads

CLC Associates have submitted downsized plans to the city's planning department from the initial 200,000 square feet to 175,000 square feet and most likely the revised project will appear before the city's planning commission for approval on Nov. 7.

"They kind of indicated they were going with a more efficient building plan," Saratoga Springs Planning Director Clark Labrum said. "They haven't told us, given any clue as to when they are going to begin construction."

Initially scheduled to begin building in spring 2007, the 22-acre project northwest of the S.R. 73 and Redwood Road intersection is on track for completion by the end of 2007 according to spokesperson Karianne Fallow at Wal-Mart's corporate offices.

"We are actually going to be building a smaller, nicer store," Fallow said. "We are looking forward to it ... assuming all goes smoothly through the entitlement process it should be completed by end of 2007."

Mayor Tim Parker has said city officials hope to use the estimated $500,000 in revenue from the store toward maintaining parks, expanding recreation programs and, "most importantly," public safety.

Wal-Mart Supercenters typically employ 350 to 500 employees, including part-time associates, and would serve consumers in the Cedar Valley, Lehi, Saratoga Springs and Bluffdale areas.

"Obviously the most important and immediate benefit will be the sales tax revenue," he said.

This story appeared in North County on page A1
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #29  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2006, 7:17 AM
jmonkey's Avatar
jmonkey jmonkey is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 1,034
ah, good old UVRMC. I was born there (1974). I had my tonsils removed there (1982). I had an emergency appendectomy there (1984). Our family doctor used to have his office right in the front of the hospital on the west side. He was probably 65+ years old when he removed my appendix in 1984. Very good doctor though.

The hospital stay after the appendectomy is marked on my brain forever, by repeated showings of the movie Battlestar Gallactica on the hospital movie channel. I think they showed that movie 8 times a day; I probably saw the movie ten times during my stay, but I was also pretty out of it--thinking back, I was pretty sedated.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #30  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2006, 11:08 AM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
jmonkey, how long is your scar?

Mine was removed in 76 and the scar is longer than left by the new techniques.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #31  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2006, 11:12 AM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Post vote for prop. 3

Proposition 3 would aid transit

By Jim Bennett


The "Vote for Proposition 3" campaign is now under way. Polling suggests that Proposition 3 in Salt Lake County has broad-based support, yet the biggest challenge we face is confusion about what the measure actually does. So here are the facts.
Both measures, Proposition 3, as well as the Opinion Question in Utah County, propose increasing the sales tax by a quarter of a cent. That part is very easy to understand. The question the average taxpayer then asks is simple: What do I get for my money?
The answer is simple: economic growth. More transit opportunities. Less congestion and gridlock.
Let's start in Utah County. By voting for the Opinion Question, Utah County voters will generate enough tax revenue to create a commuter rail line from Utah to Salt Lake County. Commuter rail from Ogden to Salt Lake City is well under way and may be in operation as early as late next year. It's hard to overstate the benefits of a commuter rail line extending from Provo to Ogden as part of a regional transit system that will benefit commuters on the road as well as on the train.
In Salt Lake County, the list and timetable of transit and highway projects is still being finalized, which can be frustrating to those clamoring for specifics. But we know the benefits will be enormous, and we ought to rally behind Proposition 3 and approve it at the ballot box Nov. 7.
One-quarter of the new tax revenue will be used to preserve Mountain View Corridor right of way, accelerating construction of a major west-side highway across the Salt Lake Valley and into Utah County. We will save multimillions of dollars by securing the necessary land now. The choice is whether we want to pay for it now or pay like crazy later.
A large share of the money generated by the new tax in Salt Lake County will help accelerate significant new TRAX and FrontRunner commuter rail projects. The Utah Transit Authority is planning construction of five rail transit projects in the county: four new TRAX lines to Draper, West Jordan, West Valley, and to the Salt Lake International Airport, as well as new commuter rail from Salt Lake City south, meeting the proposed Utah County segment. Most of the confusion surrounding Proposition 3 focuses on which of these projects will be constructed and how quickly.
Here's the answer.
All of these projects will be built under an accelerated schedule if Proposition 3 passes. But without a positive vote, some of them won't be completed until 2030 — almost a quarter century from now. By approving Proposition 3, all of these projects will be completed much, much sooner — many as quickly as 2015.
Utah's population is growing by roughly the size of Layton every year for the next three decades, and traffic congestion is increasing twice as fast. Every person who rides commuter rail or TRAX is another car taken off of our crowded roads. Anyone who has driven on I-15 across Point of the Mountain during rush hour knows exactly what I'm talking about.
The choice is clear. A quarter of a cent sales tax increase is a small price to pay to preserve Utah's future. No one wants I-15 to become the equivalent of a Los Angeles freeway.
That doesn't have to happen. In Utah County, please vote for the Opinion Question. In Salt Lake County, please vote for Proposition 3. We can create an efficient regional transportation system. If we wait, congestion will only get worse.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #32  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2006, 3:40 PM
Utaaah!'s Avatar
Utaaah! Utaaah! is offline
Expatriate
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 248
Pleasnat Grove Hotel/Convention Center

Pleasant Grove apparently wants to heavily subsidize this hotel/convention center development with city, county, and school funds. I'm generally opposed to using public subsidies for private development -- especially on raw, undeveloped ground. This project may bring outside dollars from out-of-state convention go-ers, but I'm skeptical that enough patrons will pay $284/night to fill the facility on a consistent basis. The convenient flat subsidies from restaurant and auto rental taxes will backfire if the project fails, forcing the county to contribute funds for many years without a corresponding increase in revenue. Also, while the restaurants around the facility may feed hotel/convention center patrons, they will largely draw business from existing restaurants. This is bad, bad policy IMHO. Read on....

Tax money sought for hotel

Pleasant Grove seeks county help for the complex

By Amy Choate-Nielsen
Deseret Morning News


PROVO — Pleasant Grove officials asked Utah County commissioners Tuesday for tax money to help pay a debt the city will incur so a hotel and convention center project can be built in the north Utah County city.
The city is purchasing 37 acres of land to give to John Q. Hammons Hotels and Resorts, which has proposed building a hotel and a convention center on the property. Plans for restaurants, a corporate center and an auto mall have been made for an additional 13-acre parcel of land that will be part of the project.
"The (project) would be in a caliber slightly different than that which is currently available in the valley," said Pleasant Grove Mayor Mike Daniels, who compared the proposed hotels to the Grand America in Salt Lake City.
"This isn't your pull up, roll up, roll out your carpet (event)," he said. "This is a sit-down dinner with 2,700 of your closest friends."
City officials, who offered the land to the resort-builder as an incentive for choosing Pleasant Grove as the site of the project, proposed entering an interlocal agreement with the county that would return a portion of taxes generated by the convention center— to be located by the Pleasant Grove interchange off of exit 275 on I-15— and surrounding businesses to the city. The taxes would help pay off a bond issuance that will cost about $35 million over 25 years.
Pleasant Grove proposes the county give the city one-third of the transient room tax garnered by the hotel. The city also wants to receive all of the restaurant tax generated by the 50-acre project and a flat rate of $85,000 per year to compensate for other restaurant business generated outside of the project.
"The justification is there are going to be many, many other restaurants coming to that intersection on the other three quadrants (of the project)," said Richard Bradford, Pleasant Grove economic development director. "Rather than anticipate what those collections would be, the item being negotiated is they would just have a flat amount."
The proposed agreement requests a flat figure of $50,000 from the county for car rental tax and all of the property tax increment from the county's share of the project area tax from 2008 to 2031.
All totaled, the city is looking to get about $18 million from the county. Pleasant Grove has forged a tax agreement with the Alpine School District that garners the city $8 million over the lifespan of the bond. Pleasant Grove plans to contribute about $13.5 million to the bond.
"We think our proposal is fairly straightforward," Daniels said.
Daniels added Pleasant Grove is anxious to complete the deal quickly, as the city's land deal is set to close by the end of November.
As of Tuesday, county commissioners did not have an up-to-date copy of the proposed interlocal agreement, and they requested to consider the decision when they had the correct documents. It is expected the commission will discuss the agreement within the next two weeks.
Meanwhile, Pleasant Grove's proposal needn't cause problems for other cities trying to make plans for a convention center, Commissioner Steve White said.
"There really isn't competition," White said. "As far as I'm concerned, I don't see anything that would change anything that would happen in Provo or Orem or Lehi or anywhere else because of this."
Provo officials are seeking a partnership with the county on a proposed $32 million, 80,000-square-foot facility adjacent to the Provo Marriott in downtown Provo.
White said room rates for Hammons' proposed hotels would likely hover around $284 a night, and discounts aren't given for conventions. Because of the room rates, White said, the convention center will likely draw a different customer base than other proposed convention centers.
"If there's a demand out there for that kind of facility, (Hammons) will be very successful," White said. "If there isn't, it will be very difficult. It will be interesting to see if Utah County has come that far, that fast."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #33  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2006, 9:39 PM
leebuddy's Avatar
leebuddy leebuddy is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: salt lake city
Posts: 537
Here is a rending of the new Hotel to be built.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #34  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2006, 11:53 PM
SmilingBob's Avatar
SmilingBob SmilingBob is offline
100 days to economic ruin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: South of Manilla
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utaaah!
Pleasant Grove apparently wants to heavily subsidize this hotel/convention center development with city, county, and school funds. I'm generally opposed to using public subsidies for private development -- especially on raw, undeveloped ground. This project may bring outside dollars from out-of-state convention go-ers, but I'm skeptical that enough patrons will pay $284/night to fill the facility on a consistent basis. The convenient flat subsidies from restaurant and auto rental taxes will backfire if the project fails, forcing the county to contribute funds for many years without a corresponding increase in revenue. Also, while the restaurants around the facility may feed hotel/convention center patrons, they will largely draw business from existing restaurants. This is bad, bad policy IMHO. Read on....."
I agree.

I dont like using tax incentives to build retail developments. (ie Wal-Mart, Home Depot, etc.) They will stay for 10 years, then move to the next town who will give them 10 more years of tax incentives. Not generally done with a hotel and convention center.

Here is are the good and bad points of this plan as I see it.

First, the tax money they are looking at using will be mostly generated by the project. If the hotel/convention center is not built there is no money.

Second, PG is only asking for a third of the transient room tax. The county still keeps the other two-thirds, and the restaurant portion of the sales tax which the $85,000 is an estimate of the restaurant tax for the additional restaurants not all the sales tax revenue.

Third, I usually oppose these types of projects because the school districts pay more than other government agencies, but if Alpine School District has negotiated an arrangement they see some benefit in them I will defer to them.

Fourth, Car Rental Tax--what convention visitor is going to rent a car in Utah Valley? I usually get one at the airport (ie SLC gets the revenue) when I travel. This one I don't like.

Fifth, don't like to see the county give up all of their share of the property tax from this development.

Sixth, $284 a night? This isn't New York. Maybe this is the posted rate no one really pays. It had better be one "oh my heck" of a hotel to charge more than NYC hotels.

Part of me says Hammonds must have research demand before committing to build this size of facility, but I still wonder:
Is there enough demand for this kind of facility? If so, where are these types of convention going now?
Are we talking big conventions/meetings of over 1000 people?
I do know that Utah Valley has limited meeting space for large groups. You have BYU, UVSC, Thanksgiving Point or the Marriott Hotel.

I do know that demand for meeting space is tough to find in SLC, and more available and cheaper at the Provo Marriott. I've heard they plan on going after the SLC meeting business--different from convention business. Meetings are generally local people, and conventioners travel from outside the area and need rooms to stay in.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2006, 12:09 AM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Is that $284.00 figure correct?

[ Originally posted by SmilingBob]
Sixth, $284 a night? This isn't New York. Maybe this is the posted rate no one really pays. It had better be one "oh my heck" of a hotel to charge more than NYC hotels.


It isn't the Grand America or Deer Valley either. I have to wonder about that figure. Do you think it's a mis-print. I can't imagine paying that rate, unless they plan on building a subway to Sundance direct from the hotel.

Of course, I guess this hotel is just one piece of many,i.e.:large lifestyle center,convention center etc. But still,"$284 a night"?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #36  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2006, 12:12 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Post Ivory Homes biggest project yet!!

LEHI/ Construction has commenced! Located on the south side of highway 92 which leads up to American Fork Canyon from I-15.

Ivory Ridge is an exceptional master-planned community that will take you back to the time of neighborhood markets, tree lined streets and Classic American architecture. Ivory Ridge is a complete community with 400 luxury townhomes, 435 estate homes, and exceptional new city park, retail center and an exclusive swim and tennis club - all tied together beautifully within a convenient, pedestrian friendly community
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #37  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2006, 1:02 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Post Utah's No.1 homebuilder launches flagship communtity.

IVORY RIDGE

Get ready for something big - something really BIG from Ivory Homes, the No. 1 builder in Utah. After three years of planning, Ivory Homes is releasing for reservation its new flagship community, Ivory Ridge. This exciting new community is located in east Lehi just southwest of Micron off State Road 92.

"We haven't done anything of this magnitude before," says David Zollingeer, Ivory's sales manager for Utah County.

More than 800 single-family and multi-family homes are slated for this master-planned, mixed-use community. In addition to being the biggest project Ivory has ever tackled Ivory Ridge marks several more firsts for the company.

Ivory Ridge will feature Ivory's new line of townhomes, Ivory Homes created several townhome designs just for Ivory Ridge that emphasize classic American Architecture, spacious living and ample garage space. Similar townhomes will also soon be offered in other communities such as Ivory Highlands in Taylorville and Benson Mill in Stansbury Park.

"It just shows our commitment to provide a product that meets the needs of Utah homebuyers." Zollinger says. "As the land prices go up we see maintaining affordability while offering an excellant product with great value in our townhomes."

Another first willl be the multi-million-dollar Ivory Ridge Swim and Tennis Club. Never before has Ivory Homes built such a large recreation center in one of its communities. And never before has Ivory offered memberships to people who live outside a community.

What will the Club contain? Six indoor and five outdoor tennis courts, three outdoor swimming pools to suit all uses and abilities, a volleyball court, indoor and outdoor reception areas, meeting rooms ,locker rooms, a fitness-center with weight and cardiovascular equipment, and more.

In addition, the Club will have a tenis pro shop and staff, complete with personal trainers, and instructiors to keep menbers fit and kids busy year-rond.

"What we are creating with this facility is a country-club atmosphere that has a community feel to it," says Jeff Christensen, project manager for the Ivory Ridge Swim and Tennis Club."This is designed to be the social center of the area.

In addition to the Club, Ivory Ridge has many more amenitites.

To name a couple, substantial open space that includes a large park with soccer fields, baseball diamonds and more that will anchor the community, and a walkable Center Street will offer a cluster of office space and stores, such as restaurants, convenience stores and banks.

Planning for the community has beeen immense. Ivory Ridge has gone through many public hearings and neighborhood meetings over the past two years. Many suggestions from those gatherings have been used to hone the designs.

The massive effort has paid off the Ivory Homes. The company believes in the project so much that not only are many Ivory employees planning on living there, but Ivory Homes is also building its Utah County headquarters at Ivory Ridge.

Construction on Ivory's headquarters started earlier this summer. It's expected to be one of the first buildings finished in Ivory Ridge.

Ivory Homes is especially proud of the careful atttention it put into the master plan for the community. The ultimate goal is to create a exclusive, well-planned and executed neihborhood structure with an attractive, unified architectural theme and significant amenities.

"This is the flagship community for Ivory," Zollinger says of Ivory Ridge. "We are extremely excited about it. I think it shows our commitment to our buyers and to Utah County."

The benefits of a master-planned community are many. It prevents fractured mini-subdivisions. it streamlines construction of infrastructure, and most importantly, it guarantees open space, parks and other amenities that increase quality of life.

Homes available at Ivory Ridge will come in three types- traditional single-family estates, townhomes and live-work lofts.

The single-family estates will be the same high-end homes available through Ivory's catalogue of homes. The catalogue offers more than 30 floor plans. Each home comes with countless design options and color selections.

Townhomes will be available in several locations throughoout Ivory Ridge. In addition to excellent location, the townhomes boast Classic American architecture featuring brick and stucco exteriors,2-car attached garages, rambler and two-story designs, full basements, and ample interior space.

The live-work lofts will be located in the heart of Center Street shoppping. They willl provide a unique opportunity for residents to lie above or near their work and close to retail.

Summing up the entier community. Zollinger says:

"This definately sets the tone for the quality of work that Ivory does. It also lets everybody know that we are not only able to plan a great community, but we are also very sensitive to the varying needs of our homebuyers in every demographic. Whether it be a young married couple, a move-up homebuyer, a family buying their dream home, or an older couple looking to down-size, we are going to have it all at Ivory Ridge."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #38  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2006, 2:21 PM
Utaaah!'s Avatar
Utaaah! Utaaah! is offline
Expatriate
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmilingBob
Part of me says Hammonds must have research demand before committing to build this size of facility, but I still wonder:
Is there enough demand for this kind of facility? If so, where are these types of convention going now?
Good question. Are they trying to steal business from existing hotels/convention centers in Utah? Or are they targeting groups that otherwise would meet in surrounding states. I strongly disagree with the use of public subsidies to fund competion for existing local ventures.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SmilingBob
Are we talking big conventions/meetings of over 1000 people?
I do know that Utah Valley has limited meeting space for large groups. You have BYU, UVSC, Thanksgiving Point or the Marriott Hotel.

I do know that demand for meeting space is tough to find in SLC, and more available and cheaper at the Provo Marriott. I've heard they plan on going after the SLC meeting business--different from convention business. Meetings are generally local people, and conventioners travel from outside the area and need rooms to stay in.
If they are targeting local groups, how will they fill their hotel at $284 per night? BTW, the lowest price I've paid in New York this year was $299/night, but I stayed at an Embassy in Chicago for about $145/night. I certainly wouldn't want to pay that much in Pleasant Grove.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #39  
Old Posted Oct 21, 2006, 6:18 AM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Utah County population is surging

Lehi has state's 2nd largest growth — after St. George

By Amy Choate
Deseret Morning News
LEHI — Back when the West was wild, Lehi used to be a dusty place where cowboys came to drink whiskey and trade horses.
Now, the town that is strategically located between Salt Lake City and the heart of Utah County is becoming one of the fastest growing cities in the state. According to a U.S. Census report being released today, Lehi had the second-largest increase of population from 2004 to 2005 after St. George.
"We're having growing pains learning how to be a little bit bigger than we're used to being," Lehi Mayor Howard Johnson said.
The city grew from 27,633 people in 2004 to 31,730 in 2005, according to the report. The city is continuing to skyrocket in 2006, Johnson said.
"We have traffic problems" because of the influx of population in Utah County, Johnson said. "We have a hard time responding to all of the growth wanted for the annexations, the developments; putting in the sewer and water. We're keeping up with it, but we're very busy in those areas."

Other parts of the county are also expanding rapidly.
Pleasant Grove had the sixth-biggest increase in population in the state — more than Draper or Provo. Eagle Mountain grew by 18 percent and Cedar Hills grew by nearly 17 percent.
Since anyone traveling north to Salt Lake City must pass through Lehi, the county's growth is having a slightly negative effect on the town's road system.
Johnson said Lehi's main traffic problem lies with Main Street. The two-lane road is the only major artery out to Cedar Valley from I-15, where equally booming Saratoga Springs and Eagle Mountain lie. Main Street runs through the middle of Lehi, then continues on to Tooele.
If the state does not provide another outlet from the rapidly developing area west of Utah Lake, then Lehi and its surrounding cities will be crippled economically, Johnson said.
Eagle Mountain Mayor Brian Olsen agrees with Johnson. Eagle Mountain grew from 8,760 in 2004 to 10,343 in 2005. The town, which houses mostly young families and retirement-age residents, also faces water and transportation challenges.
While Eagle Mountain offers affordable homes in a beautiful environment, Olsen said, changes will be needed to help the city continue to grow in a positive way.
"I have a political job to do, and that's push (for transportation alternatives)," Olsen said. "This is an area in our state that really needs attention."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #40  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2006, 6:13 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 14,527
Post Orem Update

Fitness center renovated

By Sara Israelsen
Deseret Morning News
OREM — To Karl Hirst, the answer to the nation's health-care issues can be found within the renovated walls of the Orem Fitness Center.
Keith Johnson, Deseret Morning NewsVisitors to the newly renovated Orem Fitness Center work out in the 6,000-square-foot addition. "I challenge you to watch TV for two nights and not see something about the national health care crisis or the obesity epidemic," said Hirst, Orem city recreation director.
"The answer to those questions is not in TV or Washington, D.C., it's in (this) building. We can solve all of the national crises in this building today."
As he spoke, Hirst pointed to the new wing of the Orem Fitness Center, a 6,000-square-foot addition at a "grand reopening" Thursday.
The addition at the center brings the total area to 105,000 square feet, with a basketball court, racquetball courts, small dance studios, a swimming pool and a weight room.
The center, built in 1979, welcomes nearly 1,500 people a day, with a current active membership of 15,386, said Lissy Sanders, fitness center manager.
Construction on the project began in March and was finished by August.
Before the new addition, cardio and aerobic equipment was jammed in stuffy hallways.
But thanks to a $1 million donation, the center was able to move the 18 treadmills and elliptical machines and the 12 exercise and spinning bikes into a new, breezy, two-story cardio area.
A new enclosed breezeway allows children who have come from the pool with wet hair and suits to wait for their parents inside rather than outside on the sidewalk.
There was also a steam room added near the pool. The steam room was the sole request by the donors, who were publicly thanked for the first time Thursday.
The Noorda family provided the million-dollar donation for the center and were at the grand reopening to see Tye Noorda's idea fulfilled and her husband, Ray Noorda, honored.
Ray Noorda, the former CEO of Novell and an Orem resident, died Oct. 9.
"We are so honored to have folks who are generous and are mindful of the community," said Orem City Mayor Jerry Washburn.
Hirst presented Tye Noorda with a new pass to the fitness center.
The center is open to anyone, although rates vary from Orem city residents to non-residents. For more information visit www.orem.org or call 229-7154.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Mountain West
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 4:48 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.