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  #61  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2006, 3:35 PM
davericard davericard is offline
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Student Housing I don't know. It' does have retail and office space. The first building is 255,000 sq ft w/ 161 units and underground parking
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  #62  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2006, 4:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wasatch_One
Davericard, this is going to be student housing for BYU. I believe that there will be in the area of 200 units total
1340 N. Freedom is where the old Turtle shell Reams was, near The Glenwood.

Last edited by SmilingBob; Oct 26, 2006 at 4:45 PM.
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  #63  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2006, 4:55 PM
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The Mountain View Corridor would change the north part of the the county a lot. These maps show a highway like Bangerter Hwy. or a Freeway with access roads between it a I-15.

Personally I like the the above option the best.

Here are the other options.

http://udot.utah.gov/mountainview/maps.php

Funny part about this to me is that they have been studying this since 2003 and won't even get started until 2008. You'd think this could be done faster, but with all the studies they have to do it takes years just to get started.
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  #64  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2006, 6:36 PM
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The Monarch of Timp!

Delts, I wish I could have seen that tree in your story. I was glad to learn that the tree didn't meet it's demise prematurely to make way for roads, etc., in the name of "progress". Most of Utah isn't blessed with an abundance of arbors. We need to save the trees we have.
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  #65  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2006, 11:20 AM
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IM Flash Technologies recruiting for Lehi plant

IM Flash Technologies, the joint venture of Intel and Micron to make NAND Flash memory, announced that it is recruiting entry-level production operators for its Lehi plant.
The partnership, which will produce memory chips for the consumer electronics, hand-held communication device and portable memory storage global markets, calls for 300 production operators.
"These are entry-level, trainable positions and the foundation to an excellent career in the semiconductor industry," Shawn Siddoway, IM Flash Technologies' recruiting manager, said in a prepared statement.
Wages start at $11 per hour, plus shift differential for night shift. Performance bonuses are available, as well as 401(k) matching, medical, dental, vision, holiday pay and a time off plan. No previous manufacturing experience is necessary.
Applications are available online at imftech.com/careers. For more information, call 801-767-4473.
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  #66  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2006, 12:44 PM
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More details on Alpine Village.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davericard
Student Housing I don't know. It' does have retail and office space. The first building is 255,000 sq ft w/ 161 units and underground parking
This was an earlier article which gave some additional details and some of the thought process for the Alpine Village project.



BYU housing dooms 'turtle'

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — The sky is falling on Chicken Little in theaters everywhere, and now the end is near for the Ream's Turtle on Freedom Boulevard.
Stuart Johnson, Deseret Morning NewsThe Reams "turtle" has stood at 200 West near 1400 North in Provo since 1961 but will soon be replaced by apartments housing BYU students. A Provo landmark because of its tortoise-shell shape, the former skating rink and Ream's grocery store may be demolished by the middle of the month after the City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to approve a new housing development exclusively for Brigham Young University students.
The Alpine Village will include more than 160 four-bedroom condominiums and a number of shops on the corner of Freedom Boulevard (200 West) and Paul Ream Avenue (about 1400 North), where the silver-domed "Turtle" has been since 1961.
BYU considers Alpine Village part of a pilot program to see how students react to apartment-style housing both on campus and off. Nationally and locally, college students appear increasingly interested in apartments over dorms.
The on-campus portion of the test begins next fall when BYU begins to move single students out of dorms at Deseret Towers and temporarily into apartments at Wyview Park, which previously had been reserved for married students. BYU announced last year that half of the current Wyview tenants must move by July. The remainder must leave by July 2007.
The university hasn't made any decisions about the future of Deseret Towers, but officials are considering renovating the six towers or tearing them down and building a new apartment-style complex for single students. That would allow married students to return to Wyview.
Off campus, BYU has an exclusive contract with Alpine Village to rent or sell solely to BYU students. The experiment, called "chartered housing," gives the university additional control of the living environment beyond what it already enjoys with other off-campus housing complexes because BYU will have the right to veto businesses that apply for commercial space.
"BYU will be allowed to screen our retail so there are no tattoo parlors or tanning parlors, for example," said Gary Otterstrom of Timpanogos West Development and Management.
Otterstrom said developers have obtained demolition permits for the Turtle and two other buildings.
Provo officials like the project because they hope it will create an urban village for 3,000 people living within a quarter-mile of the project. Plans call for more than 11,000 square feet of commercial space, including a small general grocery store like BYU's Creamery on Ninth — without the restaurant.
The project also will include a full-size basketball court, a fitness center, a sand pit for volleyball, a swimming pool, a recreation center and a study hall.
The City Council and city staff have focused on walkable communities for years, and they believe they have succeeded with the Shops at Riverwoods and other projects. Similar developments are under way near the Riverside Golf Course (Trellis on the Green) and across University Avenue from the Riverwoods (The Arbors on the Avenue).
"There are about 3,000 residents in the immediate area who would have retail shops now within a walkable distance," said Jan Yeckes, assistant director of economic development, during Tuesday night's council meeting. "There are major multiple-family projects in the area with little in common. The area is disjointed. This could bring the area together."
BYU welcomed the council's approval.
"We are excited to see the progression in this pilot program to provide chartered housing," university spokeswoman Carri Jenkins said.
Single BYU students must live in university-approved housing, and apartment complexes earn approved status by enforcing BYU's Honor Code.
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Old Posted Oct 27, 2006, 11:08 PM
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Will one of Provo's largest housing developments in four years be given the go ahead?

'Village' seeks approval

Project to replace old Joaquin Elementary

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News

PROVO — The developer paying $6.5 million to purchase the former Joaquin Elementary in Provo is asking the City Council for permission to replace the school with "Joaquin Village," a community of 236 condominiums.
The ArrowStar Group presented a preliminary proposal to the council but interviews with ArrowStar's Wayne Ross and others reveal intense interest in the project because of its proximity to Brigham Young University and long-standing concerns of neighbors about open space and traffic.
"It may be the biggest project we'll see in the four years I'll be on the council," council chairman George Stewart said.
Provo's system is set up to allow a developer to first bring a proposal through the planning commission to the council for feedback before returning later to seek final approval.
"We're just looking for guidance from the City Council to know what they think is best for this project," Ross said.
This was the first time the council had seen drawings and information about the project, which as proposed would include housing for nearly 950 BYU students and more than 600 underground parking spaces. More parking would be provided above ground on the five acres of property, Ross said.
At 550 N. 600 East, Joaquin Village would the be first major attempt at creating the sort of walkable community envisioned for BYU students by the City Council when it considered the South Campus Area Master Plan (SCAMP) several years ago. The site is within 450 feet of BYU, Ross said.
The plans also attempt to meet the unique requirements BYU has for off-campus student housing. Single BYU students are required to live in "approved housing," which means the landlords agree to enforce the school's strict conduct code.
"BYU is looking for housing developments that are conducive to students abiding by the Honor Code, that are well-managed and well-maintained," Ross said.
One way the plans do that is to create separation between the two buildings — one restricted to men and the other to women — while planning a courtyard in between where they can mingle. A central clubhouse would include exercise equipment, a sport court, a swimming pool and meeting rooms.
Neighbors expressed concern in early meetings with ArrowStar that the condos, at four stories high, were too imposing in an area filled with one- or two-story, single-family homes, said Kurt Peterson, a neighborhood activist. There were also concerns that the courtyard was too enclosed.
"Since then, they've done a fair amount of design to change the look, make it less imposing," Peterson said. "They've put some steps into the design so we're not looking at a four-story wall. They've also widened the opening to the courtyard. They also said they would provide permanent access to a sidewalk through that block to anyone who wants to walk through there. That's a plus. Neighbors were happy to hear that change."
Peterson said neighbors still would like to see the buildings pushed 20 feet back from the surrounding sidewalks.
Another SCAMP objective was to help the Joaquin neighborhood move single students out of single-family homes and increase the number of owner-occupant families living in the area. Peterson said Joaquin Village likely would aid that effort.
"One positive part of the proposal in my view is it will house 1,000 students, and many of them probably will move out of homes that frankly are better suited to housing families," he said. "The students are looking for good, quality housing and families would like to have homes back. That could be a benefit in the long run."
Neighbors do have some additional requests for the city. They want to have the city push 500 North, which now ends at 700 East, all the way through to 900 East. "We'd like to know city's schedule for completing that road," Peterson said. "We realize there are properties to be purchased and road to be paved."
Neighbors also have suggested blocking access from 500 North to the southbound lane on 600 East. That would prevent the influx of students from using 600 East to travel south to Center Street — past Farrer Elementary School.
After more than 65 years, Joaquin Elementary closed its doors for good in the spring of 2005. Provo School District officials determined it would be cheaper to sell the land than to renovate.


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  #68  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 5:53 AM
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PROVO - Where do we put all the students?

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HEIDI TOTH - Daily Herald

For rent. That's the most popular advertisement in Provo, it seems, with the signs cropping up everywhere -- on homes, on duplexes, on major apartment complexes.

Yet the buildings just keep coming. Joaquin Elementary School came down two months ago to make room for high-density student housing. The Reams turtle was demolished in February and work began almost immediately on the Alpine Village. Student housing just radiates out from Brigham Young University.

But those for-rent signs just stick around. Sure, they move around some to various complexes and buildings, but the number never seems to decrease in a city that's more than half filled with rentals.

The newest developer entering the market is Steve Maddox, who wants to build 120 units on just more than six acres. His proposal would raze the old Meridian School on 300 North and 900 East and build Meridian Housing. The question of a zone change comes before the Planning Commission next week.

On the one hand, Maddox has reason to be worried, because the Provo Municipal Council, whenever more high-density housing comes up, asks why the city needs more. But on the other hand, said Municipal Council Chairman George Stewart, they're deferring to the housing market to regulate how much housing is needed. The properties going up still are being filled.

"Now where it's located is not a market decision," he said.

Maddox made the argument to Foothills Neighborhood residents Thursday night that Meridian provides an ideal location for student housing.

It's right by a bus stop, most of the additional traffic will feed onto 900 East and it's close to retail and other amenities. The three and a half story structure will be buffered by 100 feet of green space all around, which turns into just more than an acre that can become a city park.

No concerns were raised by neighbors at the meeting, most of whom seemed pleased by Maddox's commitment to make Meridian a positive development. He wanted to make sure that happened for his sake as much as theirs.

"When you have this much to rent out, you cannot let it become dilapidated," because students make their rental decisions based on friends' and relatives' experiences, he said.

But the question of where to put the thousands of students attending BYU and Utah Valley State College and living in Provo is more complicated than neighborhood agreement, and there's more to it than how the number of rooms compares to the number of students, said Provo City Community Development Director Gary McGinn. The city has to consider a number of factors and see if each proposal makes sense.

He agreed with Stewart that there wasn't a need to start limiting the number of complexes coming into Provo.

"Obviously there's a finite limit. You can't have 1 million new units come on line," he said, adding that wouldn't be possible from anyone's standpoint. "The absorption rate into the community just isn't there."

The city also has to consider the location and design of the project, he said.

The good thing about these new developments, both men said, is if done right, they potentially can improve the rent vs. own situation in Provo.

The idea, McGinn said, is as the new buildings with amenities, more space and close proximity to campus come in, students opt for those instead of smaller single-family homes that have been converted to apartments.

Stewart declined to comment on the Meridian project specifically, since the issue is still in the land use committee and hasn't come before the council yet.

Stewart did wonder if high-density housing was appropriate for this neighborhood, which he thought might be better served by getting some single-family homes in.
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Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 5:59 AM
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Say goodbye to Deseret Towers

Y. to raze residence halls

By Jeremy Twitchell
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — Brigham Young University's overhaul of student housing took another step forward with school officials announcing that two of the residence halls in the landmark Deseret Towers complex will be razed.
All of the Deseret Towers, on-campus dormitories for BYU single students, are expected to be demolished within the next two years. No date has been set for the work and a contractor has not yet been selected, but university officials indicated the demolition will proceed in a "timely manner."
The other five buildings at Deseret Towers will remain in service for the coming school year, though they are expected to be vacated and razed as well over the next two years.
The university has not yet decided how to replace Deseret Towers, saying it is still investigating the changing needs and desires of students before determining what type of facility to select. Any long-term decisions are not likely to come before the housing master plan is completed and there is no timetable for when that might happen.
"We want to take our time and we want to be careful," BYU spokeswoman Carri Jenkins said.
BYU is experimenting with a pair of pilot programs where the emphasis is on moving from dormitory-style housing to apartment housing. BYU Housing employees said BYU has seen rising vacancy rates in its on-campus dormitories, particularly Deseret Towers.
"Although we will need more time to study this issue, we are seeing a trend that students are requesting more apartment-style living versus the traditional room-and-board," Julie Franklin, director of residence life at BYU, said in a statement.
For the coming year, the university has displaced nearly half of the students in Wyview, its apartment complex built in the 1990s for married students, to make room for single students.
The remaining married students at Wyview have been given until July 1, 2007, to vacate so the complex can be devoted entirely to single student housing for the 2007 school year.
Jenkins said student response to the Wyview option has been positive and those apartments are full for the coming year.
BYU has also signed two deals with private property owners as part of a second pilot program, which makes those complexes exclusive for the use of BYU students.
The first was signed with Alpine Village, a 159-condominium project being built west of campus that is expected to be completed by fall 2007. Centennial Apartments, located south of campus, also recently signed such an agreement.
"In these arrangements, the private property owner will work closely with the university in providing appropriate housing," Jenkins said.
The arrangements allow BYU to directly train employees at the complexes regarding BYU policies and services, Jenkins said.
The university has been updating its housing complexes since 1992, when it began renovating the eight dormitories in the Helaman Halls facility. That job was finished last summer and the focus shifted to Deseret Towers.
BYU announced last September it would be removing the aging buildings, the first of which were built in 1964. The two buildings to be removed, V Hall and W Hall, are actually the newest structures, having been built in 1969 and 1978, respectively. But the two were targeted for demolition first because they are built on a separate spot, west of the other buildings, and will be easier to remove.
Brian Evans, administrative vice president and chief financial officer at BYU, said in a statement that rising maintenance costs have made it no longer prudent to operate the obsolete buildings, and added that their infrastructure is ill-equipped to deal with the needs of modern students.
"For instance, unlike in 1964 when students came with a radio alarm clock, students now come with computers, MP3 players, hair dryers, curling irons and more," he said. "There are simply not enough outlets to handle their needs."


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Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 6:08 AM
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Thanksgiving Point Gardens, maturing beautifully.

A rose by any other name...

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CATHY ALLRED - North County Staff
The Daily Herald

The Gardens at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi is always changing as was seen in approaching the apex of this past rose season. This past season the Thanksgiving Point roses, all 600, were rich and vibrant, reflecting the attentive care they receive at The Gardens.

"They were beautiful," Tracy Edurman, Garden director, said. "They really are quite spectacular."

The roses weren't always as prolific. Two years ago, one third of them, 200 rose bushes, died from a rare disease called Pseudomonas. First seen in the Intermountain Region in Idaho in 1997, Thanksgiving Point is the only site in Utah to have had to fight the blight.

"I think three years ago is when we first really noticed it," Larry Sagers, Thanksgiving Point USU Extension Service representative, said. "It's more of a problem where you have moist climates."

Quickly ascertaining the problem, Thanksgiving Point gardeners took steps to eradicate the bacterial blight losing only a few dozen rose plants last year. They have installed a drip irrigation system to replace the sprinkler system, use Lysol wipes to clean the shears, use disposable gloves and treat the roses in the fall with a copper sulfate solution.

Whether it is a Pseudomonas blight or an early frost, Thanksgiving Point gardeners work constantly to maintain the beauty and peace prevailing at The Gardens.

Utah landscape architect Leonard Grassli created 10 thematic gardens within 55-acre The Gardens. Visitors can take in panoramic view of The Gardens from the Grand Allee, cross the Monet Bridge over a bubbling creek, and enjoy the cool mists from the largest man-made waterfall in the western hemisphere.

This year, The Gardens, not just the Rose Gardens, offered an unusually rich display of blossom and greenery.

"With the extra rain we had everything is just lush and green," Edurman said. "The blooms on the water lilies in the Monet Gardens were six inches in diameter, just huge,"

The Grand Allee takes visitors down into The Garden. At the bottom of the pathway is the Creek Garden where the gurgling stream leads travelers through a collection of creeks and ponds surrounded by an expanse of stately lawns.

Some 60 varieties of new and old roses are displayed in the Rose Garden and are cared for by some 30 gardeners. An arbor and benches are provided for resting under the shade of the climbing roses.

A 1.8-acre lake with boardwalk reflects Claude Monet's masterpieces with a replica of Monet's bridge. Walking up a cobblestone path that spirals a hill crowned with neo-classic ruined columns, visitors can enjoy a panoramic view of The Gardens from a garden bench at the Vista Garden.

The centerpiece of the Fragrance Garden in the southwest part of The Gardens is a garden temple surrounded by dozens of plants and flowers chosen to stimulate the sense of smell. Perhaps one of the most popular gardens at Thanksgiving Point, The Secret Garden was inspired by the classic children's novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

The Italian Garden is a Mediterranean Renaissance water garden reminiscent of a sixteenth century Italian villa with cascading basins flanked by yew hedges and benches. The Butterfly Garden is shaped with a pathway formed in the shape of butterfly wings and has a meadow filled with plants that provide food and shelter for butterflies.

A large carousel with topiary horses is the focal point of the Paterre Garden.

Neighboring the expansive Gardens, Thanksgiving Point Institute added a Children's Discovery Garden with its Noah's Ark water fountain, mazes, paw print trails and story time amphitheater. Additional attractions include the Garden Gate Gift Shop, the visitor and reception center, the Garden Trellis Cafe and the Horticulture Learning Center.
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Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 6:13 AM
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High-end condominium for Provo country club

DAVID RANDALL - Daily Herald

After 17 years of waiting and planning, developer David Gardner has started work on a $16 million condominium development at the north end of Freedom Boulevard.

The upscale Trellis on the Green, intended for empty-nesters, will soon be overlooking the third and fourth holes of the Riverside Country Club.

Gardner has been hoping to develop the property, occupied by two homes, since the late 1980s, but until recently he wasn't able to get the separate owners to sell at the same time.

Gardner decided to buy the land once both plots became available, even though he hadn't yet run his plan for the land past the Provo City Council. The council approved the building earlier this month.

"I think the council felt it was a quality product," he said, though he admitted he was nervous about the presentation.

City Councilman Dave Knecht said he couldn't find anything wrong with the development and liked the proximity to area businesses and entertainment.

"I liked the idea -- that it's walkable," he said.

The four-story building will include 43 units in one large building with an atrium, swimming pool, exercise room and views of Mount Timpanogos, Squaw Peak and the golf course.

"It's going to be a very beautiful high-end type condominium," said Carl Bacon, one of the developers working on marketing for the project.

Prices for the condos will range from around $300,000 to $500,000, and owners will be required to sign restrictive covenants saying they won't rent out the units, Gardner said.

Construction on the project could begin as soon as October, though Gardner admitted that's a little optimistic. He expects once construction begins the building will be done in about a year.

Bacon said he has already talked to some people who have expressed interest in the complex, and now with the approval from the council he is ready to start reserving spaces.

Concerns have been raised about how the building would affect parking, traffic and the Provo skyline, but Gardner said the effects would be minimal.

"From an economic standpoint it will actually be a benefit," he said. "I think it will appeal to people who might otherwise move out of the area to find this kind of product ... people that have some disposable income."

Knecht said he didn't consider concerns about the size of the building a major issue.

"If we were worried about blocking views we wouldn't have any two story houses in town," he said.

The building will sit back away from major roads, and developers plan to keep the area's tall trees.

"It will continue to be a secluded, tree-lined area," Bacon said.
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Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 1:50 PM
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Variety Magazine
Hollywood, California


Stone Five Studios, owner of HaleStorm Entertainment, expanded its Mormon-based film niche to include more general audience family fare with the building of a new Utah studio.

The studio hopes to lure filmmakers with a new incentives bill signed by Governor Huntsman that went into effect July 1. 2005. House Bill 17, a post-performance rebate returning 10% for every dollar spent in Utah, allocates $1 million for the 2006 fiscal year for filming in the state.

"The studio allows for all the accommodations available to serve as a base camp for any major production," said Dave Hunter, Stone Five Studios' CEO and president of HaleStorm Entertainment. "We're excited about a studio that will not only provide local filmmakers with the necessary resources for film and video production but also helps to entice out-of-state filmmakers to shoot their movies here."

HaleStorm, founded in 2001 by entrepreneurial friends Dave Hunter, Kurt Hale and George Dayton, morphed into their newest venture, Stone Five Studios, which also boasts established distribution channels through many of the leading theater chains, DVD rental and retail outlets.

New facility, is a 42,000-square-foot site built on three acres in the Riverwoods area of Provo, Utah.

Complex features two fully equipped film and TV soundstages and a state-of-the-art recording studio featuring a Foley stage and band accommodations. Several video editing suites, including fiber-optic networked editing systems, a high-end compositing station and full HD editing capabilities, are housed in the studio as well.

"With Stone Five's film studio and the recent addition of the incentive fund for filmmakers, the state will have greater success enticing more filmmakers and producers to shoot in Utah than in previous years," said Leigh Von der Esch, director of the Office of Tourism.
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Old Posted Oct 29, 2006, 12:27 PM
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More on Stone Five studios.

A door closes, 2 open

BYU's Pilling wanted Holmoe's job — but he gets pair of jobs

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — Nine months after Brigham Young University hired Tom Holmoe as athletic director, the other finalist in that search is leaving BYU.
Peter Pilling announced he will run the business operations of Stone Five Studios, the Utah company that owns HaleStorm Entertainment and HaleStorm Distribution, which produced the movies "Singles Ward" and the "Home Teachers" for LDS audiences.
At nearly the same time Thursday, BYU announced a new corporate marketing agreement that will keep Pilling involved with the Cougar athletic program. He will be a minority partner in the university's deal with ISP Sports, completing a soft landing for Pilling after the disappointment of finishing behind his friend Holmoe in the race for his dream job.
ISP will be responsible for boosting sales of corporate sponsorships of BYU sports. It will also sell signage at games, ads in game programs and on byucougars.com, but it won't sell TV or radio rights or advertising. ISP is based in Winston-Salem, N.C., but will maintain an office at BYU. The company is a partner with 25 other college sports programs including Alabama, Cal, Miami (Fla.), UCLA and Washington.
"The company has a well-deserved reputation as the foremost authority on collegiate sports marketing," Holmoe said in a press release. "We feel the addition of ISP Sports will bring BYU athletics one step closer to being the best in the business on and off the playing field."
The job with a film studio turns out to be a dream gig for Pilling, too. He has a part as a basketball coach in Stone Five Studio's next release, "Church Ball," which is scheduled to be in theaters in March. He was the ice cream man in "Home Teachers" and was an extra in M. Night Shyamalan's international hit "Unbreakable." He even wrote a script after seeing Shyamalan at work, but don't expect HaleStorm to film it or to see Pilling on the silver screen again.
Stone Five Studios has launched an ambitious one-stop shop in Provo for filmmakers and wanted Pilling to be its chief operating officer and to court investors for a $20 million fund that will finance five films.
"Each movie will have a budget of $2 million for production and $2 million for marketing," Pilling said. The films will be family-oriented but not specifically directed at LDS audiences. "Instead of aiming for 5 million LDS Church members in the United States, we'll try to capture 50 million people who want to go see a good movie with family values."
Stone Five is building a 42,000-square-foot film studio and sound stage in Provo's Riverwoods area. The new studio will include a recording studio, band accommodations, mixing console and several video-editing suites.
"Stone Five can take a movie all the way from production to distribution," company CEO David Hunter said.
Pilling and Holmoe ran the Cougar athletic department on an interim basis for seven months after BYU fired Val Hale and Elaine Michaelis in September 2004. BYU handed the reins to Holmoe on March 1, 2005, and Pilling continued as senior associate AD responsible for revenue enhancement, finances, marketing and corporate sponsorships.
Pilling had been a self-described nomad climbing the ladder toward an AD slot. He served as an associate athletic director at Villanova, St. Bonaventure and the University of Wyoming and held other administrative athletic positions at Morehead State and the University of Kentucky.
"I've wanted to be an AD, and a couple of executive search firms called about some AD jobs back in the Midwest and East, but it's not a priority for me right now," Pilling said. "I decided I didn't want to move, I wanted to stay in the community, and with Stone Five and ISP I had two tremendous opportunities to stay for my family and my career.
"One door just closed and two phenomenal doors just opened. I'll be involved in film industry and be involved in college athletics."
BYU marketing director Tony Jewkes will become the general manager of ISP's BYU account. Karen Tebbs, recently hired in corporate sponsorships at BYU, will become an ISP account executive. A third position will be filled in the future.


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  #74  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2006, 6:58 PM
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DT is getting razed? Guess it's about time.. the only good thing about them was that they were "tall" for provo. Hope they replace them with other talls..
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  #75  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2006, 10:36 PM
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Yeah, I walked over to BYU by "V" and "W" on my walk today ... No plywood yet, but they've covered up all the windows with paper on the inside.

What's odd is they are actually removing the brick from "V" Hall and are loading it onto pallets and wrapping it up ... almost like they are saving the tan brick for another project. Is tan brick that valuable of a commodity?
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  #76  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2006, 12:21 AM
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Location: Provo, UT & Denver, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrendog
DT is getting razed? Guess it's about time.. the only good thing about them was that they were "tall" for provo. Hope they replace them with other talls..
The company that is designing the new BYU dorms is Architectural Nexus (their website is archnexus.com if youre interested)

here are some renderings of the new dorm project, however, it is going to be built on 8th north and between 4th and 5th east (currently a parking lot)

Taken from their site

Heritage Halls/8th North Student Housing, Brigham Young University -- Provo, Utah

Architectural Nexus was recently awarded the design of phase 1 for the Brigham Young University New Student Housing along 800 North which is currently in schematic design. Architectural Nexus also completed the initial program and master plan for the 3 different housing complexes at Brigham Young University including the replacement of Heritage Halls Housing, Deseret Towers Housing, and new student housing identified as 800 North. The Heritage/Deseret Towers complex will comprise 3000 beds and 1,213,884 G.S.F. The 800 North complex will comprise 1000 beds and will be 645,306 G.S.F.

BUILDING SIZE
1,859,190 S.F.
In Schematic Design
BUDGET
$374,121,200







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  #77  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2006, 12:32 AM
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Wasatch_One Wasatch_One is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StevenF
I remember that back in 96 or 97 there was a proposal for a 13 story building that was to go up on the North end of Provo's downtown. Does anyone know what happened to it?
Steven,

I would love to investigate more into this as well...

I have lived in Provo since 1992 and all I can recall is a hotel proposed at the mouth of Provo Canyon that was suposed to be like 8-10 stories back around 1996 or so.
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  #78  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2006, 12:59 AM
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Wasatch_One Wasatch_One is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
DAVID RANDALL - Daily Herald

After 17 years of waiting and planning, developer David Gardner has started work on a $16 million condominium development at the north end of Freedom Boulevard.

The upscale Trellis on the Green, intended for empty-nesters, will soon be overlooking the third and fourth holes of the Riverside Country Club.

Gardner has been hoping to develop the property, occupied by two homes, since the late 1980s, but until recently he wasn't able to get the separate owners to sell at the same time.

Gardner decided to buy the land once both plots became available.
Here is a picture of the location. Its in the bottom left hand corner of the picture (next to the golf course and the two houses that were torn down are also visible in the picture)



Here are some pictures from their website www.trellisinfo.com





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  #79  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2006, 1:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
StevenF,
The tower you're talking about would be at the mouth of Provo Canyon. While there are new multi-level office towers going up there,I seem to remember a ruling against anything over a certain height. We ought to look into it .
From what I have been able to find out, that tower was nixed. Too much opposition by surrounding neighborhoods. That particular location is 360 degrees,surrounded by multimillion dollar homes with spectacular views. There are some very attractive office buildings, but at only about 5-6 stories max.
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  #80  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2006, 2:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wasatch_One
Here is a picture of the location. Its in the bottom left hand corner of the picture (next to the golf course and the two houses that were torn down are also visible in the picture)



Here are some pictures from their website www.trellisinfo.com





Wow Wasatch, Great Pics. Can you imagine having one of those condo's with an expansive view of those greens and Timp towering in the middle. A view couldn't be any more spectacular. And all within an urban environment.
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