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  #81  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2006, 2:03 AM
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[QUOTE=Wasatch_One]Here is a picture of the location. Its in the bottom left hand corner of the picture (next to the golf course and the two houses that were torn down are also visible in the picture)











Wow Wasatch, Great Pics. Can you imagine having one of those condo's with an expansive view of those greens and Timp towering in the middle. A view couldn't be any more spectacular. And all within an urban environment.
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  #82  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2006, 11:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Wasatch_One
Steven,

I would love to investigate more into this as well...

I have lived in Provo since 1992 and all I can recall is a hotel proposed at the mouth of Provo Canyon that was suposed to be like 8-10 stories back around 1996 or so.
called Deseret News archive department and found it.

13-STORY BUILDING TO SPROUT IN DOWNTOWN PROVO NEXT YEAR

By Jim Rayburn, Staff Writer

Utah County's skyline will grow a few hundred feet next year when Boyer Co. of Salt Lake City builds a 13-story office building in downtown Provo.
``We feel the time is right to build a major office building in downtown Provo,'' Boyer President Kem Gardner said at a press conference Friday morning. ``We hope it will be the catalyst for future growth in this very prime market area.''The $25 million, state-of-the-art tower will be built north of Provo Park Hotel on Freedom Boulevard between 100 North and 200 North, adjacent to the 4th District Judicial Center. The office complex will be named One Freedom Center. Construction will begin in the spring and is planned for completion in the summer of 1997.
``We've never announced a building that we haven't built,'' Gardner said.
The first 12 floors will contain a total of 200,000 square feet of office space. Boyer officials are still negotiating with several potential tenants. The 13th floor will be a penthouse conference and meeting center. The building will be constructed mainly of steel and concrete, but the bottom facade will be made of red granite.
The complex will be built on land purchased from the city for about $1 million. The city will use tax increments from the increased value of the property to construct a 660-stall parking structure north of the building.
The 209-feet tall building will be Utah Valley's highest structure. In comparison, the Nu Skin building is 100 feet high and Kimball Tower on the campus of Brigham Young University is 150 feet high.
``This will be a monolith and landmark for downtown and the whole valley,'' said Gary Golightly, Boyer Co.'s leasing agent.
City officials say the office complex is another piece in the city's goal to revitalize downtown Provo. Plans were recently announced to expand Provo Park Hotel and build a new conference center, and the city is helping to build a new mall in south Provo.
``There's a great deal of support for what's going on in Provo,'' council chairwoman Jane Carlile said.
Mayor George Stewart said he believes hotels, office buildings and conference centers belong in the downtown area - that's why he opposed plans two years ago for a hotel and conference center in Riverwoods Business Park.
``This office building just immeasurably adds to that equation,'' Stewart said.
Gardner said the building will fill a niche for more office space so local companies can expand and new ones locate in Utah Valley. The mayor said the city is looking for an increased retail tax base. New jobs are a byproduct of the project.
``The sales tax base is the real key to a city's growth as far as financing goes,'' the mayor said.
The city once planned to construct a performing arts center on the land, but financing on the project is far behind schedule. Stewart said the city will find another place to build the arts center.
``That project is too far in the future. The need for this complex is now,'' he said.
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  #83  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2006, 11:11 PM
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I will see if I can find a rendering now.
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  #84  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2006, 11:32 PM
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StevenF,

So when was this announcement made? Is this building downtown still a go?
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  #85  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2006, 11:34 PM
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Lehi is planning park on a 72-acre plot

LEHI, Utah (AP) — Saying it could attract many visitors, city leaders are talking about turning 72 acres into a recreation destination, with golf, fishing and ice skating.
"This has a million possibilities," city planner Kim Struthers said. "This is going to be an exciting park. It's goingd to draw from the whole region."
Lehi, north of Provo in Utah County, purchased the Thomas J. Peck Family Park a year ago for $50,000 per acre.
Construction has begun, but a parking study and design work still must be done before the City Council can give preliminary approval. The project also will go before the Parks and Trails Committee for review.
The plan includes a skate park, fishing pond, cascading water, a water-play area for children, a skating pond, a large-event pavilion and several smaller pavilions. The public could be charged to use them.
Council member Mark Johnson said the city is considering selling plastic bracelets that would allow all-day access.
"It would definitely be a regional draw. It's not a common park," said Jamie Davidson, city administrator.
Struthers said Johnson has donated his time over nine months to draw a concept plan, a service that would have cost the city at least $11,000.
"This obviously has the potential to be a pretty exciting project," Johnson said. "Having 72 acres is a heck of a lot of property. There is a lot you can do up there."
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  #86  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 12:09 AM
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``We've never announced a building that we haven't built,'' Gardner said.

And yet this would be the first.
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  #87  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 12:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StevenF
called Deseret News archive department and found it.

13-STORY BUILDING TO SPROUT IN DOWNTOWN PROVO NEXT YEAR

By Jim Rayburn, Staff Writer

Utah County's skyline will grow a few hundred feet next year when Boyer Co. of Salt Lake City builds a 13-story office building in downtown Provo.
``We feel the time is right to build a major office building in downtown Provo,'' Boyer President Kem Gardner said at a press conference Friday morning. ``We hope it will be the catalyst for future growth in this very prime market area.''The $25 million, state-of-the-art tower will be built north of Provo Park Hotel on Freedom Boulevard between 100 North and 200 North, adjacent to the 4th District Judicial Center. The office complex will be named One Freedom Center. Construction will begin in the spring and is planned for completion in the summer of 1997.
``We've never announced a building that we haven't built,'' Gardner said.
The first 12 floors will contain a total of 200,000 square feet of office space. Boyer officials are still negotiating with several potential tenants. The 13th floor will be a penthouse conference and meeting center. The building will be constructed mainly of steel and concrete, but the bottom facade will be made of red granite.
The complex will be built on land purchased from the city for about $1 million. The city will use tax increments from the increased value of the property to construct a 660-stall parking structure north of the building.
The 209-feet tall building will be Utah Valley's highest structure. In comparison, the Nu Skin building is 100 feet high and Kimball Tower on the campus of Brigham Young University is 150 feet high.
``This will be a monolith and landmark for downtown and the whole valley,'' said Gary Golightly, Boyer Co.'s leasing agent.
City officials say the office complex is another piece in the city's goal to revitalize downtown Provo. Plans were recently announced to expand Provo Park Hotel and build a new conference center, and the city is helping to build a new mall in south Provo.
``There's a great deal of support for what's going on in Provo,'' council chairwoman Jane Carlile said.
Mayor George Stewart said he believes hotels, office buildings and conference centers belong in the downtown area - that's why he opposed plans two years ago for a hotel and conference center in Riverwoods Business Park.
``This office building just immeasurably adds to that equation,'' Stewart said.
Gardner said the building will fill a niche for more office space so local companies can expand and new ones locate in Utah Valley. The mayor said the city is looking for an increased retail tax base. New jobs are a byproduct of the project.
``The sales tax base is the real key to a city's growth as far as financing goes,'' the mayor said.
The city once planned to construct a performing arts center on the land, but financing on the project is far behind schedule. Stewart said the city will find another place to build the arts center.
``That project is too far in the future. The need for this complex is now,'' he said.
Interesting that they are currently building the performing arts center as we speak (renovating and adding on to the old city library)

This building will not be built for two reasons.

1. the land once slated for this building now has a convention center planned on it.

2. Around this same time Provo City rezoned an area on the Provo River at the mouth of Provo Canyon to be an office park.

From Provo City's website:
At the mouth of Provo Canyon is the Riverwoods Business and Research Park. One of Provo's class-A business parks. Riverwoods features 112 acres of beautifully landscaped real estate with a spectacular view of majestic Mount Timpanogos...

Since then there has probably been 20 new office buildings adding a conservative 2-3,000,000 sq ft of office space to Provo.

This parks land as been filled approx 80-85%. In my opinion, downtown Provo will not see a major office building until this business park has been built out.

Last edited by Wasatch_One; Oct 31, 2006 at 5:13 PM.
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  #88  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 1:18 AM
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aha.. i remember that bldg being proposed for provo.. it would be cool to have a couple 10-15 story bldgs in dt provo..
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  #89  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 3:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
StevenF,

So when was this announcement made? Is this building downtown still a go?
It was in the Deseret News back in July of 95
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  #90  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 11:39 AM
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Here's an interesting article about the Provo airport.

This would be a critical link if we're going to see more tower development in the Provo metro hub.

Radar for Provo Airport?

Support by S.L., visit by Peters may clinch deal

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News


PROVO — A turbulent effort to bring radar to the Provo Municipal Airport might enjoy a soft landing now that the Salt Lake International Airport plans to help and new U.S. Transportation Secretary Mary Peters is planning a visit.
The Federal Aviation Administration has repeatedly turned down requests by city leaders and Utah senators to put radar in Provo because the FAA doesn't believe the airport is busy enough. Salt Lake City's support is conditioned on basing the radar at the Point of the Mountain, and the plan could get a boost when Peters visits for a personal inspection at the invitation of Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah.
Salt Lake City is interested in radar at the Point of the Mountain because it would act as backup for its operations and would solve the problem of a radar shadow in Utah Valley.
The mountains make it impossible for radar operators in Salt Lake City to see anything below 8,000 feet in Utah Valley. The shadow created a problem in January when air traffic controllers diverted six flights bound for Salt Lake City to Provo because of bad weather. The radar shadow made it difficult for the planes to take off after the weather improved.
"The Salt Lake International Airport has agreed to submit the request in its name," Billings told the Provo City Council. "In exchange, we agreed to put it at the Point of the Mountain, where it can serve all of Utah County and as a backup for Salt Lake."
The radar could help operations at the Spanish Fork airport, as well as Provo, Salt Lake International and Salt Lake City Airport No. 2 in West Jordan.
"The Salt Lake City Department of Airports does support the radar because of its regional benefit," department spokeswoman Barbara Gann said. "So we are working with the Provo airport and will pursue a group effort to entice a radar system to the area."
The radar would cost the FAA about $12 million. Hatch is lobbying to pave the way for the funding.
"It is crucial that the Provo Airport receive adequate radar coverage for the safety and future of air travel along the Wasatch Front," Hatch said. "I encouraged Transportation Secretary Mary Peters to take a look at this very important safety initiative, and I was pleased she accepted my offer to visit Utah to see firsthand the airport site. Improving radar coverage in Utah County is a high priority for me, and it's high time something is done about it.
"The partnership between the Salt Lake City International Airport and the Provo Airport is a very important step forward in getting the radar installed and operational. I commend these two entities for working together for the good of both communities."
Peters hasn't determined the date of her visit.
The FAA temporarily installed radar in Provo for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, but lobbying efforts to keep it by Sen. Bob Bennett, R-Utah, were unsuccessful.
"The FAA continually scores us too low to get radar," Billings said.
A new radar system could be the state-of-the-art ASR-11 radar. ASR stands for automated surveillance radar. The system deployed in Provo during the Olympics was ASR-9. Salt Lake International operates with ASR-9, Gann said.
Radar could open the door to bringing commercial service to Provo.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Last edited by delts145; Oct 31, 2006 at 11:54 AM. Reason: mistake,placed duplicate article
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  #91  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 11:40 AM
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By Jared Page
Deseret Morning News
If traffic on I-15 in Utah County grinds to a halt, so will the economy.
That's the message local elected leaders and concerned citizens are trying to get out to the public before voters decide the fate of a sales tax increase to fund commuter rail and other transit and road projects.
A citizen-driven public awareness campaign is under way to ensure that voters know exactly what they'll be voting for or against when they cast their ballots on Nov. 7.
Meanwhile, local elected leaders are making the rounds in the business community, service clubs and other organizations to voice their support of the tax and the reasoning behind it.
Utah County voters will be casting ballots on whether to increase the sales tax by a quarter of a cent to address the county's transportation woes. If it passes, the tax would generate an estimated $765 million, based on what Mountainland Association of Governments officials say is a conservative annual growth rate of 5.5 percent.

Most of those funds would be allocated for construction and early operation and maintenance of a 22 1/2-mile commuter rail line from Provo north to the Salt Lake County border.
"Nobody likes a tax increase, but we need this one," said Thone Heppler, former regional president for Zions Bank and chairman of the public awareness campaign. "We need it to remove the congestion (on I-15) that's already here and will get worse. We need it to keep business commerce going so we're a healthy county with a healthy state economy."
The Utah County Commission unanimously voted in August to put the tax increase on the ballot. That decision had the support of MAG, which coordinates transportation planning in Utah County, as well as local mayors.
"We either pay for it now and put it in so we have the capacity for people to move in our state," Provo Mayor Lewis Billings said, "or we choose not to pay for it and then our economy eventually grinds to a slower mode as congestion increases and people can't get to and from their work."
Commissioner Steve White paints an equally bleak picture. I-15 in Utah County is due for a makeover in the next five to six years. Work will take about four years to complete, and during that time traffic likely will be limited to two lanes in each direction.
In addition, Utah County is growing by 18,000 to 22,000 people every year, increasing daily traffic on I-15 by 2,000 to 2,250 vehicles each year, White said
"We're going to have another 10,000 cars a day (on I-15) by the time we get four years down the road," he said.
Recent history shows how much Utah County residents rely on I-15 to travel within the county and to and from Salt Lake County. With three lanes, the freeway was gridlocked — often coming to a complete stop — during the morning and evening commutes until a fourth lane was opened in May.
A trip from Lehi to Springville took about 90 minutes before the fourth lane opened, White said. A reduction to two lanes — without any freeway alternatives — would make things even worse.
"It would take 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 hours to go 25 miles in Utah County during rush hour," White said. "Is that what we really want? Or would we rather get the cars off the road by having commuter rail?"
Darrell Cook, MAG executive director, says he expects the public awareness campaign in Utah County to benefit from the state Legislature's decision during last week's special session to allow counties to levy a third quarter of a cent sales tax to pay for transportation projects.
Salt Lake County will put the third quarter-cent on the ballot in November. Utah County voters will be asked to add a second quarter-cent.
"I think you're going to see some synergy as the Salt Lake County campaign takes hold and there's additional visibility and publicity from that," Cook said. "You'll see the two kind of building on each other. There'll be some compound effect and complementary benefit."
The Utah Taxpayers Association hasn't taken a position on the quarter-cent sales tax increase, said Mike Jerman, vice president of the group that advocates low taxes, sound tax policy and economic development.
The state's transportation needs must be addressed, but giving counties the OK to raise sales taxes isn't the solution, Jerman said.
"State-level governments need to spend more money on transportation," he said. "(Commuter rail) should be funded at the state level, not the local level — but obviously that's not going to happen."
The taxpayers association favors congestion pricing, a form of tolling in which the cost to use a road increases by congestion.
"Congestion pricing is about giving people financial incentive to change their driving habits," Jerman said. "Obviously, that's not going to happen between now and November. In the long run, that's what needs to happen."
Although elected leaders unanimously support the tax increase, governmental institutions are prohibited from spending taxpayer money to advocate an issue unless they allocate equal funds to each side.
That puts the public awareness campaign in the hands of citizens, who are raising money from area businesses to publicize the issue through the media and with promotional materials.
Billings says Provo is putting together an information packet on the quarter-cent sales tax increase to provide to anyone who requests the information.
"(Provo city's) legal counsel says, as an elected official, it's not only my right to put out that kind of factual information, but it's my obligation to do that," he said.
Billings said he also plans to support the citizen's committee in his own time and expects that other mayors will get similarly involved.
"The mayors are pretty revved up about this," he said.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Last edited by delts145; Oct 31, 2006 at 11:56 AM.
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  #92  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 12:27 PM
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Also posted on no magic cash and SLC development thread

Ballot propositions

Salt Lake County—Proposition 3

Title: Sales and use tax for corridor preservation, congestion mitigation, and expansion of capacity for regionally significant transportation facilities

Question: Shall Salt Lake County, Utah, be authorized to impose a 0.25 percent sales and use tax for corridor preservation, congestion mitigation, or to expand capacity for regionally significant transportation facilities?

Utah County — Opinion Question

Title: Official ballot opinion question for Utah County, Utah County option sales and use tax opinion question.

Question: Should the Board of County Commissioners of Utah County, Utah, impose a sales and use tax of 0.25 percent pursuant to the provisions of the County Option Sales and Use Tax for Highways, Fixed Guideways, or Systems for Public Transit Act, with 87 percent of the revenues received from the imposition of the said tax being allocated for a project or service relating to a fixed guideway system (commuter rail), with 5 percent of the revenues received from the imposition of said tax being allocated for a project or service relating to a system for public transit, and with 8 percent of the revenues received from the imposition of said tax being allocated for either new construction, renovation, improvements, or an environmental study, and the associated debt service and bond issuance costs for state highway projects within Utah County?
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  #93  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 12:56 PM
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Big-D wins pact to build IHC center in Provo
Big-D Construction announced Monday that it has been awarded a $39 million contract with Intermountain Healthcare to build the Utah Valley Outpatient Center at Utah Valley Regional Medical Center in Provo.
The four-story, 91,000-square-foot building will include imaging services, lab services, rehabilitation and same-day surgery. Construction will begin in November, with completion set for December 2007.
The project also includes an $11 million, three-level parking terrace.
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  #94  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 5:40 PM
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Pleasant Grove overpass on State St.

Here are a couple of artist views of the overpass in PG on State St. over the railroad bridge instead of expanding under the bridge.

This is badly needed to relieve the bottle that develops there.
Getting around this construction will be tough. There aren't that many good roads to use a secondary access points.




Project Name: U.S. 89: State Street Railroad Bridge, Pleasant Grove

Project Location: State Street, between Main Street (Geneva Road) and 200 South in Pleasant Grove

Project Design Schedule:
  • Design Phase Start-up – Oct. 2006
  • Right of Way Acquisition Start-up – Sept. 2007
  • Design Completion – Sept. 2007
  • Anticipated Construction Start-up – Dec. 2007
  • Anticipated Construction Completion – Fall 2009
Project Overview: In June 2006, the Federal Highway Administration issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) after reviewing the Environmental Assessment conducted by UDOT for improving the railroad bridge crossing at State Street (U.S. 89) in Pleasant Grove. UDOT has now moved into the design phase. The improvements include:
  • Eliminating the bottleneck by widening State Street from the current two lanes to five lanes (two lanes in each direction with a center turn lane, shoulders, curb and gutter, park strips, and sidewalks).
  • Removing the existing UTA/UPRR bridge and building a new highway bridge which crosses over the tracks.
  • Improving the State Street and Geneva Road intersection
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  #95  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 5:51 PM
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KBYU show on transportation in Utah Valley.

Did anyone see the show on transportation issue in Utah Valley on KBYU last night. Lots of great information on what UDOT and UTA are looking at to handle the fast growth in Utah Valley.

Mentioned that 8,000 homes are expected to be built in Lehi in the next 5 years. Basically doubling the size of Lehi. Don't know if this includes Saratoga Springs and Eagle Mountain, but probably does.

Population in Utah Valley is expected to grow to 900,000 by 2030.


Who Goes There?



KBYU-TV Air Times
11/6/2006 9:30:00 PM

The new KBYU Documentary “Who Goes There?” examines transportation issues facing Utah County in the coming decades. A fast growing population threatens to overwhelm existing transportation infrastructure. The impact spreads beyond the county as the impediments to commerce and convenience compound with clogged highways. The documentary examines various proposals to improve transportation in the county. Voters in Utah and Salt Lake Counties will be asked to hike taxes in order to fund improvements.

Watch “Who Goes There” Monday October 30 at 9:30pm and again Monday November 6 at 9:30 pm.
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  #96  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 7:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmilingBob

The new KBYU Documentary “Who Goes There?” examines transportation issues facing Utah County in the coming decades. A fast growing population threatens to overwhelm existing transportation infrastructure. The impact spreads beyond the county as the impediments to commerce and convenience compound with clogged highways. The documentary examines various proposals to improve transportation in the county. Voters in Utah and Salt Lake Counties will be asked to hike taxes in order to fund improvements.

Watch “Who Goes There” Monday October 30 at 9:30pm and again Monday November 6 at 9:30 pm.
I'll definately write that down for November 6. It sounds very interesting.
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  #97  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 7:21 PM
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SmilingBob, I was looking again at your post on the overpass. It's about time they did something there. Have you heard anything similar for the one on State Street in Midvale/Sandy? Or have they already expanded it, and I just missed it.

About the overpass in Pleasant Grove. That's a perfect point of entrance to create a sort of gateway. Even if it's only a nicer rod-iron railing and those vintage style lamplights. That rendering doesn't seem to give it much in the way of aesthetics. I've been very impressed with the development around PG lately(i.e.,new interchage,historical homes restored around downtown,etc). Hopefully, they will use the same sense of style with this bridge.
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  #98  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 8:28 PM
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900,000 people by 2030 and not a single descent highrise to be found.
how sad.
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  #99  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2006, 1:58 AM
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When Utah Valley has over one million people, especially the southern end of the valley from Springville to Santaquin, then you will see more of a skyline around Provo.
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Old Posted Nov 1, 2006, 6:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
When Utah Valley has over one million people, especially the southern end of the valley from Springville to Santaquin, then you will see more of a skyline around Provo.
900,000+ residents by 2030. Utah Valley in 2030 will look like Salt Lake area right now. We are going to need a lot of new transportation options. I talked to my Utah House Rep. and he mentioned that the Freeway option of the Mountain View Corridor is the most likely option right now. That would definitely increase the need for more high rise office buildings. Someone needs to take the bull by the horns and bring people on board to build some 10-15 story buildings.
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