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  #21  
Old Posted Oct 21, 2006, 1:40 PM
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Thumbs up Nice pics of historic St.George Temple

More building's that look like this in the mix please.

www.delange.org/SGTemple/SGTemple.htm
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  #22  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2006, 2:21 PM
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St. George's best golf holes, You Decide!

GOLFING YEAR 'ROUND
IN UTAH'S GOLF CAPITAL

If you've ever dreamed of playing golf near national parks with towering red sandstone cliffs on the horizon with desert flora in the landscape, say hello to the Red Rock Corridor. Golf Magazine calls our area, The Red Rock Corridor, and it is centered in St. George. Our golf courses have been described as "golfer's paradise," "dreams come true, " "secret golf mecca," "golf galore and more." Yes, St. George's lush golf courses lure many people to this area to experience a golfer's paradise. There are ten public courses and one private golf club.

Golf Digest's Top Golf-Home Markets - West


Per capita, the St George area offers more golf than any other spot in the sunbelt. In fact, there are more courses per captia in St George than almost anywhere else in the country. The City of St George offers four great golf courses. They are: Sunbrook Golf Club, St George Golf Club, Southgate Golf Club and Red Hills Golf Course. Sky Mountain Golf Course is owned by the City of Hurricane and Washington City's pride is their Green Spring Golf Course. Bloomington Golf Club located in Bloomington is the only private course in the area.

Coral Canyon Golf Course, Entrada Golf Club The Ledges, and SunRiver Golf Club are privately owned golf courses which are all open to the public. Information about these courses follow in alphabetical order.


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BLOOMINGTON COUNTRY CLUB
Par-72, 18 holes......7,082 yards
Phone: 435-673-2029


The Bloomington Country Club is the only private member owned club in the St. George area. This course is located in Bloomington and is surrounded by foothills and lush vegetation with a driving range, quality food and superior facilities for its members!



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CORAL CANYON GOLF COURSE
Par -72, 18 holes golf course.....7,029 yards
Phone: 435-688-1700 www.coralcanyongolf.com

Coral Canyon Golf Course is the newest addition to Washington County golf. Coral Canyon is located 10 miles north of St George just off the Hurricane (SR9 Hi-way) exit.

Set amidst beauty and splendor, Coral Canyon was designed to blend in with it's natural surroundings. Many Utah golfers are already rating Coral Canyon as on of the top golf courses in the state.. With 100 acres of turf, 55 bunkers, two lakes and numerous washes running throughout the course, Coral Canyon offers enough obstacles to test any golfer. Coral Canyon is player friendly and features generous landing areas and five different tee blocks to suit golfers of all ages and skill levels.

The beautiful, full-service clubhouse at Coral Canyon features a pro shop and a restaurant, and a friendly staff is eager and willing to accommodate your every need.


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DIXIE RED HILLS GOLF COURSE
Par-34, nine-hole course.....2,733 yards
Phone: 435-634-5852 www.sgcity.org\golf\redhills.ap

Dixie Red Hills Golf Course is a favorite among those golfers who like a relaxed, enjoyable round of golf. It is perfect for the golfer who likes to walk the course and enjoy the outdoors. Dixie Red Hills, which opened in the mid-1960's, was the first of four golf courses that the City of St. George has developed.

The most player-friendly golf course in Washington County, Dixie Red Hills meanders around the red sandstone cliffs of Utah's Dixie Hills, Hundreds of mature cottonwoods, pines and mesquite provide ample shade during the warmer months.


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ENTRADA AT SNOW CANYON
Par-72, 18 hole golf course...7,262 yards
Phone: 435-674-7500 www.golfentrada.com

Entrada at Snow Canyon is one of the most beautiful and one of the most difficult golf courses in Washington County and the state. Entrada features breathtaking views of the beautiful red rock Snow Canyon. You will marvel at the beauty and serenity of Entrada at Snow Canyon and you will appreciate the difficulty the designer and developers faced to layout this golf course. You might have already played Entrada as this course was chosen as one of the courses you can play on Access Software Links LS '99.

Entrada at Snow Canyon features a pro shop and snack bar to supply you with all the equipment and refreshments you will need.


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GREEN SPRING GOLF COURSE
Par-71, 18-hole golf course.....6,629 yards
Phone: 435-673-7888 www.greenspringgolfcourse.com

Green Spring Golf Course is owned and operated by Washington City and is one of the finest courses in Washington County, It was ranked one of the top five new public golf courses by Golf Digest in 1991.

Green Spring features great variety if natural obstacles from hills and gorges to ravines and mountains throughout its 18 holes. The course offers great scenic beauty of red rock mountains and Pine Valley Mountain in the background.

Green Springs includes a large clubhouse, snack bar, pro shop and driving range.


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SKY MOUNTAIN GOLF COURSE
Par-72, 18 hole golf course.....6,312 yards
Phone: 435- 635-7888 http://www.ci.hurricane.ut.us/departments/golf.html

Perhaps the biggest challenge you will have at Sky Mountain is keeping your mind focused on golf as you view the spectacular Virgin River gorge with its red rocks glowing in the warm sun. Sky Mountain Golf course is located 15 miles north of St George in Hurricane. Sky Mountain is a player-friendly course and offers a driving range, pro-shop and snack bar.


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ST GEORGE GOLF CLUB
Par-73, 18 hole golf course.....7,217 yards
Phone: 634-5854 www.sgcity.org\golf\sggolfclub.asp

St George Golf Club boasts that they have some of the state's best greens and is home to the St George Amateur. It is located in the Bloomington Hills area of St George and is a St George City owned course. The par 3s at St George Golf Club are some of the most difficult in Washington County with average yardage of at least 190 yards, featuring forced carries over water. Moderate hills and generous terrain make St George Golf Club easy on the legs.


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SOUTHGATE GOLF CLUB
Par-70, 18 hole golf course.....6,100 yards
Phone: 435-628-0000 www.sgcity.org\golf\southgate.asp

Southgate Golf Club, located on the south end of St George just east of the freeway, is a favorite among locals because of it's laid back atmosphere and player-friendly design. Southgate is another beautiful, city-owned golf course and is great for those who are looking for a little break on their scoring average. If you like par 3's, then this is perfect for you. Southgate has matured into a course people enjoy playing time and time again.

Southgate Golf Club features a pro shop, snack bar, range and several teaching programs directed by a staff of PGA golf professionals.


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SUNBROOK GOLF CLUB
The Point - Par 36, 9 holes........ 3.375 yard
The Woodbridge - par 36, 9 holes......3,444 yards
Blackrock - Par 36, 9 holes......3,384 yards
Phone: 435-634-5866 www.sgcity.org\golf\sunbrook.asp

Sunbrook Golf Club is the crown jewel of St. George City. Rated by Golf Digest as the No. 1 publicly owned course in the state, Sunbrook is the only golf club in southwestern Utah to feature 27 championship holes on three distinct nines. This course features lakes, waterfalls, and rock walls along the picturesque Santa Clara River.

The Point nine is a 3,375-yard par 36 that features some great risk/reward holes that will force the golfers to decide to play safe or to go for it.

The Woodbridge nine is a par 36 that measure 3,444 yards and puts a premium on shot placement.

The newest nine, Blackrock, meanders through an ancient lava field and requires accurate tee shots. It is par-36 and 3, 384 yards.

Sunbrook Golf Club is a favorite destination of golfers everywhere and features more variety than any other facility in Washington County. With 27 holes of golf from which to choose, Sunbrook is able to meet all of your expectations for a great golf destination.

A new, 14,000 square-foot clubhouse features a roomy pro-shop, giant snack bar and a beautiful deck to relax on after a round of golf.


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SUNRIVER GOLF CLUB
Par 71, 18 holes........6,704 yards
Phone: 435- 986-0001 www.sunriver.com

SunRiver Golf Club is one of the newest on the Washington County golf scene and is the highlight of the Sun River retirement community. Located in the south end of St. George near Bloomington, SunRiver opened in the spring of 2000. SunRiver has enough features to keep the best players on their toes, but is considered to be a player-friendly course. The course features superb views of Pine Valley Mountain and the vermillion cliffs north of St George. Several fairways sit above the banks of the Virgin River and the natural terrain varies from riverside to desert. The layout is fun to play and offers some of the best greens in the state.

Sun River Golf Club has a pro shop, snack bar, driving range and short game practice area.



Areas Best Golf Holes - You decide!










ST GEORGE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 97 E ST GEORGE BLVD, ST GEORGE, UT 84770
Phone: 435-628-1658 E-mail - hotspot@stgeorgechamber.com B
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  #23  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2006, 11:29 AM
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Dixie future may hinge on water

Copyright 2006 Deseret Morning News
By Dave Anderton
Deseret Morning News

ST. GEORGE — When the first 300 Mormon families arrived here in 1861, it rained for 40 days, according to accounts from the time.
Jason Olson, Deseret Morning NewsSand Hollow Reservoir between St. George and Hurricane has helped supply water necessary for the area's huge growth. But during most years since then, finding enough water to sustain life has been a struggle for those who have made the desert their home.
"Building dams to divert water from the Virgin and Santa Clara rivers was a constant battle," said Doug Alder, past president of Dixie College and a St. George resident. "The whole history of the county has been water development. Every 10 years you had a water project. Many of them didn't succeed."
Yet at least in the short term, water concerns do not seem to be slowing new residential development in Dixie.
In fact, the Washington County Water Conservancy District has 25,000 acre feet of unallocated water reserves, enough to support at least 20,000 new households or 60,000 people, according to a report commissioned by the Deseret Morning News and prepared by James Wood, director of the University of Utah's Bureau of Economic and Business Research.
That should be enough water to last until 2020, according to Barbara Hjelle, assistant manager and general counsel of the Washington County Water Conservancy District. And with plans under way to build a 120-mile pipeline from Lake Powell to St. George, the county's water needs could be assured until 2039, Hjelle said.
The area will need every drop it can find.
With a growth rate of 8 percent, Washington County is the nation's fifth-fastest-growing county.
More than 600,000 people will live in Washington County by 2050, according to the Governor's Office of Planning and Budget. But some believe the state's projections are off. Allan Carter, director of developer services for Southern Utah Title Co., which tracks real estate transactions on a daily basis, estimates that the county will surpass the 600,000 mark by 2038.
"There's a lot of development going on down here and a lot of people coming to us for water," Hjelle said. "A lot of folks come to us and say, 'You should not develop water, because you should stop growth in Washington County.' Those sorts of decisions should be made by the people who are elected. We are not trying to drive policies of growth through water."
Without the Lake Powell pipeline, which will channel about 70,000 acre feet of water annually and support 200,000 people, water could become a constraint by 2020, Wood said.
The district's biggest customer is St. George, which purchases 10,000 acre feet of water annually. Another 2,000 acre feet of water is sold to Washington city, with smaller blocks of 500 to 1,000 acre feet sold to other municipalities.
Traditionally, cities paid for blocks of water under so-called "take or pay" contracts, meaning they paid for a block of water whether they used it all or not.
That all changes in April, when municipalities begin paying only for the water they use, and a new $4,300 water impact fee is charged by the county on all new recorded lots.
"In the past, the district promoted water conservation, people reduced their water usage and the cities had the same bill to us whether the water was used or not," Hjelle said. "Now we are in harmony with one another. If we promote water conservation and their people use less, they pay less."
For people like Merritt Frey, executive director of the Utah Rivers Council, that is good news. Frey is concerned about St. George's high per-capita water use.
At 391 gallons, St. George residents consume more water per capita on a daily basis than people in Albuquerque, Las Vegas and Phoenix, according to a 2005 study by the U. bureau.
"No matter what you might think about different proposed projects, the first order of business down there has got to be water conservation and lowering the per-capita water use," Frey said. "Especially when you think about every person you add at a higher per-capita water use, there's just a multiplier effect there. If they can start to bring that down now, they can really stretch their existing supply." Frey added that it is important that the Lake Powell pipeline, at a cost of $370 million for the Washington County portion, is paid through user fees.
"As this area is booming and people are increasing their property values by 35 percent a year, the cost of that development should really be reflected in water bills, rather than subsidized through taxes," Frey said. "People will argue that there is statewide benefit at some level to this work, but what we've really seen in studies is that if that cost is not reflected in water bills, we see water waste. When the cost is incorporated, people are motivated to conserve."
Alder said the county's relatively inexpensive water has sent an anti-conservation message.
"We haven't had to conserve, but all this growth is totally dependent upon water," Alder said. "We will never have a surplus."


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Old Posted Oct 27, 2006, 12:53 PM
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ST. GEORGE-- Hundred's of people showed up in St. George recently to review plans for more than a dozen transportation projects idling just over the horizon in Utah's fastest growing county.
"We wanted to not only help people understand what's happening, but to let them know what the timelines are for some of these projects," said Myron Lee, the public involvement coordinator for the Utah Department of Transportation Region Four. "Normally, if we get 30 or so people to an open house, we're happy. So we were extremely pleased with the turnout at this event."
More than 750 people strolled the booths of the free expo held at the Dixie Center. Many took a moment to visit with project engineers, voice concerns or seek answers to questions.
Comments posted on a wallboard expressed frustrations with traffic signals, unfinished or flood-damaged trail systems, big truck rigs using tightly wound roundabouts and dangerous intersections throughout St. George. Various booths dealt with things like building a long-distance off-road vehicle trail, adding more public transportation and plans for beltway routes that would connect Ivins with Bloomington/SunRiver and St. George with Hurricane.
"As an urbanized area, as a whole, we're trying to get our arms around these transportation projects," said St. George city traffic engineer Aron Baker. "We know we have to plan as a group and that what we do impacts other cities. We wanted to get the message out that a lot of these projects involve the whole community and we wanted their comments and guidance."
Anonymous comments were accepted throughout the process and many people voiced their thoughts and concerns, said Lee.
Construction under way on St. George Boulevard, which is adding raised medians and eliminating many left turn options, is financially hurting many of the smaller business owners, and there is widespread concern that a project planned for Bluff Street will do the same.
"We had comments left on maps, on the wall board, at booths and on forms," said Lee. "We have a huge job ahead of us to just compile the comments and forward them to the right jurisdiction."
Representatives from UDOT, various Washington County cities, different engineering firms and the Dixie Transportation Planning Organization gathered at the expo with charts, handouts and other visual tools to illustrate 17 transportation projects.
Santa Clara, a city once known for its shady, tree-lined lanes and delicious fruit stands, is trying to recapture its Swiss heritage by installing newly designed streetlights, landscaping, water features, benches and underground utilities.
Traffic congestion problems exist everywhere and the solutions aren't quick or cheap. Hundreds of millions of dollars will be needed to complete the projects proposed at the expo.
"Our biggest challenge is the phenomenal growth that we're seeing all over the county," said Lee. "We're trying to accommodate the growth we have right now and build roads that will last 30 years or more. We don't want to have to come back and do this over again for a while."


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  #25  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2006, 3:14 PM
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Thumbs up Cool Pic's of one of St.George's spectacular new golf courses.

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Old Posted Oct 27, 2006, 3:20 PM
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Thumbs up St. George, town of many historic structures.


Photo By: Dave Caron








Last edited by delts145; Nov 15, 2006 at 8:32 PM. Reason: additional photo's.
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Old Posted Oct 27, 2006, 3:23 PM
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Last edited by delts145; Nov 14, 2006 at 2:07 PM.
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Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 1:55 PM
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Post Legislators take a look at growth down south.

By Nancy Perkins
Deseret Morning News

ST. GEORGE — A handful of state legislators toured southern Utah, visiting several potential building sites for projects that will accommodate the region's growing school system, tourism and justice system.
"Going on tour and coming down here to see the growth is a lot different than just hearing about it," said David Clark, R-Santa Clara, who joined members of the capital facilities and administrative services subcommittee for the tour on Monday. "Kicking the dirt and seeing the growth yourself is a very important part of understanding it."
Half a dozen state lawmakers joined members of the State Building Board for the statewide capital facilities tour that began and ended in Salt Lake City, Clark said. Tour members visited potential project sites in St. George, Cedar City and Richfield. The team also looked at a proposed site for a joint driver license/Division of Motor Vehicle building in Utah County.
Topping the list of capital facility projects in Washington County was the building that currently houses the Fifth District Court in St. George. Judges now hear cases in cramped quarters in a building next to the St. George administrative center.
Officials with the city, Washington County School District and the state are working on a three-way real-estate deal that would give each entity room to expand. About $1.5 million in state funds has already been allocated for the design work on a new courthouse building that could cost as much as $28 million to construct, according to documents on the legislative fiscal analyst's Web site.
Also on the tour was a multiusee learning center on the Dixie State College campus, and a 20-acre parcel in Hurricane that the college would like to purchase for the Dixie Applied Technology Center.
The nearly 34,000-square foot learning center will be designed to adapt to the college's changing needs, said Chris Taylor, Dixie State College spokesman.
Another stop on the tour was a possible location for a new St. George Welcome Center along I-15. The present welcome center sits on 28 acres of prime commercial property that St. George officials want to sell. The resulting funds would help pay for the city's share of another future project, the Southern Corridor, which would skirt the St. George replacement airport on the southeast side of town.
A legislative capital facilities committee will review the long list of state-funded capital project requests before submitting its recommendations to the 2007 Legislature, Clark said.


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Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 1:58 PM
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Affordable housing sought in Dixie

Committee seeks more tax credits for low-income projects

By Nancy Perkins
Deseret Morning News

ST. GEORGE — Washington County is facing an "affordable housing crisis" that needs immediate attention, according to members of the Dixie Area Workforce Housing Affordability Committee.
In a letter sent to the Utah Housing Corporation, the committee requested help in the form of more tax credits for low-income housing projects in the county.
"Over the past couple of years, we have noticed that there are fewer and fewer tax-credit projects being built in Washington County," said the letter, which was addressed to Bill Erickson, president of the Utah Housing Corp. "When we ask some of the developers why they are not continuing to develop properties, their answer is always that they cannot be competitive any more."
The committee members include elected representatives from Washington County and the cities of St. George, Santa Clara, LaVerkin, Ivins, Washington and Hurricane. The committee is part of a larger group committed to finding solutions to the affordable-housing problems facing county employers and residents.
Washington County is the fifth-fastest-growing county in the nation, with a year-over population increase of more than 8.25 percent, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Many elected officials who worry about providing and paying for public services see that statistic as a double-edged sword.
Members of the St. George City Council cited area growth as the biggest factor in their vote to increase residential- and commercial-development impact fees.
"Who should pay for this growth?" Ed Bacca, a St. George resident, asked during a public hearing on the impact fees. "Not homeowners who already paid for the current impact of development."
But Councilman Larry Gardner said he was troubled by Bacca's comment.
"St. George has always been built on a 'pay it forward' attitude," Gardner said. "I think we have to be careful saying we as individuals don't have any obligation to others who may want to live here. We've talked long and hard about attainable housing, and $10,000 may make the difference on whether (prospective homeowners) can get financing for a home or not."
According to the affordability committee's letter, construction costs in Washington County have increased and the labor pool is shrinking. The vacancy rate for rental housing is currently 1.7 percent, while the rate for the rest of the state is just over 4 percent.
Compounding that problem is a boom in real-estate prices, with the average cost of a home shooting up more than 36 percent during the first quarter of 2006 to $327,322, according to the Utah Association of Realtors.
Land prices have also soared, from $50,000 per acre five years ago to more than $225,000 per acre and higher today, depending on the location of the property. Only 18 percent of Washington County is privately owned, which means there is a limit to what can and can't be developed, the committee's letter said.
"We truly believe that our housing problem is unique and larger than in any other area of the state. We hope that we can find out how to provide a means for getting the available resources to where they are needed the most," the committee's letter informs Erickson, who was not available for comment.


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Old Posted Oct 31, 2006, 12:13 PM
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Thumbs up Kudo's to SkyWest!!!

Hopefully that new airport in St. George will be built sooner rather than later.

Net income increases at SkyWest

Deseret Morning News

ST. GEORGE — Regional airline SkyWest Inc. on Monday reported higher year-over-year net income on a 59 percent increase in operating revenues.
The company said net income totaled $40.7 million, or 63 cents per share, for the quarter ended Sept. 30. That compares with $30.1 million, or 51 cents per share, for the same quarter in 2005.
The earnings per share in the most recent quarter matched the consensus expectation of Wall Street analysts.
Operating revenues were $791.8 million, up from $497.3 million a year earlier.
For the first nine months of the year, SkyWest reported net income of $114.6 million, or $1.82 per share, on operating revenues of $2.33 billion. That compares with $73.6 million, or $1.26 per share, on operating revenues of $1.22 billion for the first nine months of 2005.
Contributing to the financials was the company's acquisition of Atlantic Southeast Airlines Inc., which was completed Sept. 7, 2005. ASA is now a wholly owned subsidiary.
At the end of the quarter, SkyWest had 333 regional jets and 74 other aircraft. It had $595 million in cash and marketable securities. Its long-term debt increased to $1.51 billion, compared with $1.42 billion at the end of 2005.
SkyWest Airlines, based in St. George, operates as United Express and Delta Connection carriers. Atlanta-based ASA operates as a Delta Connection carrier. Together, they serve 229 cities in the United States, Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean with 2,441 daily departures.
SkyWest Inc. stock rose 79 cents, or 3 percent, Monday to close at $26.90 per share. During the past year, the price has ranged from $20.88 to $34.09.
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Old Posted Nov 1, 2006, 2:02 PM
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Gold's Gym creates complex in St. George

Gold's Gym of Utah, which operates 15 locations in Utah, this week will open a 50,000-square-foot sports complex in St. George.
A grand opening ceremony will be held at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at the gym, 434 N. Mall Drive.
Gold's Gym of Utah is slated to have 20 gyms by 2007.
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Old Posted Nov 5, 2006, 7:09 AM
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TRUST LANDS SELECTS DEVELOPER FOR HIDDEN VALLEY PROJECT



The State of Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration has selected Ivory Homes for the creation of a community consisting of 995 residences on 360 acres of trust land at Hidden Valley in St. George. Hidden Valley is located one to two miles southeast of the Bloomington interchange on I-15.



Hidden Valley will feature attainable housing in a variety of designs including single-family homes, patio homes, town homes, and apartments. The community will have a park, an elementary school site, a community center, and an urban trail system.



This project signals the return of Ivory Homes to the St. George area. Ellis R. Ivory was the original developer of the Bloomington area of St. George and founder of Ivory Homes. Ivory has been a successful real estate developer and homebuilder along the Wasatch Front during the intervening years.



"I am very happy to have a company such as Ivory Homes working with us on this significant project," says Kevin Carter, Director of the State of Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration. "I am confident they can deliver a high-quality product that will please the St. George community. The undertaking is expected to put multiple millions of dollars into Utah's Permanent School Fund over the next decade. We at Trust Lands look forward to the groundbreaking."



According to Clark D. Ivory, Chief Executive Officer of Ivory Homes, "We are excited to have been selected by State Trust Lands to develop and build this exciting new community in St. George. The location and master plan for Hidden Valley are well situated and will offer us an opportunity to provide exceptional design, quality construction and a commitment to service in the St. George marketplace."



The School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration is an independent state agency that manages 3.4 million acres of Utah trust lands for the benefit of Utah=s schools and other public institutions.
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Old Posted Nov 10, 2006, 3:26 PM
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Post Quenching the thirst of St.George and Las Vegas

Lake Powell, Utah




Nov. 2006

Las Vegas Review-Journal

QUENCHING THIRST

Pipeline network aims to provide water for growth in Nevada,Utah,Arizona

By HENRY BREAN
REVIEW-JOURNAL


Seventy years after the completion of Hoover Dam, plans are in the works on a new round of massive public projects aimed at supplying water for growth in Nevada,Utah,and Arizona. Within decades, the region could see a groundwater pipeline network stretching north from Las Vegas, and long pipelines from Lake Powell into Southern Utah and north central Arizona.

White Pine County rancher and pipeline opponent Dean Baker gives an aerial tour of Snake Valley in eastern Nevada, one of several rural watersheds targeted for groundwater development.
Photo by John Locher.

When drawn on a map, the Southern Nevada Water Authority's proposed pipeline network across Eastern Nevada resembles a weed growing north from the parched soil of Las Vegas.

A wider view reveals other weeds set to sprout from the garden. Over the next 20 years, as many as three massive pipelines could be built in Nevada, Utah and Arizona. Those projects would cost hundreds of millions of dollars and stretch across hundreds of miles of remote terrain to deliver water to growing communities barely within reach of the Colorado River.

"I guess somewhere we decided as humans it's better to take the water to the people instead of the people to the water. I guess we'll keep doing that," said Dennis J. Strong, director of the Utah Division of Water Resources.

Southern Nevada's pipeline network is merely the largest and costliest of the proposed projects. It is also the only one that seeks to tap groundwater in one watershed and move it to another.

The pipelines under consideration in Utah and Arizona would carry Colorado River water to burgeoning population centers in those states, far from the river's banks.

The Utah pipeline is expected to deliver almost 70,000 acre-feet of water a year to feed growth in St. George and along the Interstate 15 corridor in the southwest corner of the Beehive State. It also would supply 10,000 acre-feet to Kanab and 20,000 acre-feet to Cedar City.

But that will require no small feat of engineering.

First the water will need to be lifted some 2,600 feet from Lake Powell, near Glen Canyon Dam, to a high spot in the layer cake of sedimentary rock known as the Grand Staircase. From there, the water will fall some 3,000 feet to the Sand Hollow Reservoir northeast of St. George, possibly generating electricity on its downhill run to offset some of the project's overall power costs.

By the first of the year, the state expects to hire a consultant to analyze the energy aspects of the project, Strong said.

It will be six to 18 months before project officials are ready to file a right of way application for the pipeline, a move that will kick off a federal environmental review of the project.

"We are very early in the process," Strong said.

Some officials predict that without new water sources, shortages could hit in some areas of Southern Utah by as early as 2012.

The Lake Powell pipeline, preliminarily priced at about $500 million, might not be in place until 2020.

Arizona's pipeline project is even further out than that, "if it ever happens at all," said Thomas Whitmer, manager of regional water planning for the Arizona Department of Water Resources.

A study released by the department in August concluded that the north central part of the state will face "some serious unmet demands in the next 40 to 50 years," Whitmer said.

The area in question includes the Grand Canyon, the Navajo and Hopi reservations, and the communities of Flagstaff, Williams, Sedona and Page.

The study outlined about a dozen possible water solutions, including a 250-mile pipeline from Lake Mead to Flagstaff. Another, more likely scenario involves a shorter pipeline from Lake Powell to several communities in north central Arizona.

The various solutions range in cost from $400 million to $600 million, estimates Whitmer described as rough "appraisal-level numbers" that are daunting nonetheless.

"These are some very big dollars, especially for small communities," he said. "And you can build a pipeline, but the question is, what are you going to fill it with?"

Virtually all of Arizona's share of the Colorado River, 2.8 million acre-feet a year, is already spoken for. Much of it is diverted into the Central Arizona Project canal that feeds Phoenix and Tucson, and the rest is used by farming interests on or near the river.

Plans to supply north central Arizona with water from Lake Powell could be further complicated by a political distinction that divides the Colorado River into two basins, upper and lower.

Arizona is in the lower basin, but Powell is considered part of the upper basin, so any pipeline that taps the reservoir would require a potentially contentious water transfer between the two basins.

Unlike Arizona, Utah has more than enough Colorado River water to spare for a pipeline.

Utah's annual share of the river is 1.7 million acre-feet, of which roughly 1 million acre-feet are put to use each year, Strong said.

By comparison, Nevada uses, and reuses, nearly all of its allotment of 300,000 acre-feet, the smallest share by far among the seven Western states that draw water from the river.

One acre-foot of water is almost enough to supply two Las Vegas homes for one year.

"Just like Nevada intends to use all of its (Colorado River) allocation, Utah intends to use all of its allocation," Strong said. That could occur by 2030 or 2035, though he said "those are guesses."

"We can go wild with speculation about all the things that might happen," Strong said.

With an estimated cost of at least $2 billion, the Southern Nevada Water Authority's 285-mile pipeline project has moved well beyond speculation.

Sometime next year, Nevada's chief water regulator is expected rule on the authority's request to export almost 30 billion gallons of groundwater a year from White Pine County's Spring Valley, 250 miles north of Las Vegas.

Of the approximately 170,000 acre-feet of rural groundwater the authority ultimately hopes to deliver to Las Vegas, fully half of it would come from Spring Valley.

Authority officials insist there is enough unused water trapped beneath the rock in Clark, Lincoln and White Pine counties to satisfy Southern Nevada's growing thirst and its need for drought protection without harming the environment.

Water authority Deputy General Manager Kay Brothers said projects like the ones now being discussed in Nevada, Arizona and Utah are not so different, at least philosophically, than the Roman aqueducts built 2,000 years ago.

"It's nothing new," Brothers said. "It is what has allowed the West to grow. It's how it's been and how it will be."

But what some view as the march of human progress others see as a direct threat to their homes and their livelihoods.

Dean Baker and his family have been ranching for more than 50 years in one of the area's targeted by the SNWA. Their Snake Valley spread straddling the Nevada-Utah border is so large that Baker sometimes uses a small aircraft to check on cattle and range conditions.

He also gives the occasional tour, flying interested guests over old cattle ponds and spring-fed marshes that have been dried up by nearby agricultural pumping.

Baker points to these things as proof that his valley has no water to spare, let alone billions of gallons for some faraway city.

"I don't believe anyone experienced in underground water withdrawal in an area such as this thinks such a withdrawal can happen without significant negative impact," he said. "It just won't work

Last edited by delts145; Nov 14, 2006 at 12:04 PM.
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  #34  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2006, 3:08 PM
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Elim Valley Project/ Grade A Development!!






www.dpz.com/project.aspx?Project_Number=519&P...
Share your thought's on this style of development.

Elim Valley is a new community to be located within the town boundaries of Hurricane, Utah, and comparable in size to its downtown. The site itself presents tremendous opportunities because of its location adjacent to the county’s capital, St. George, and on account of the county’s population growth rate. The city of St. George has been named the second-fastest growing city in America, and the new town will provide approximately 10,000 new housing units. This will help accomodate this population growth without initiating sprawl.

The masterplan of Elim Valley calls for a community made of several neighborhoods, with a mixed-use town center to the north, and a golf course and resort hotel and village forming an island of open space in the center. The body of the town will be located to the south, with several neighborhoods interconnected by greenways and lakes. Each neighborhood will have its own center, as well as greens and canals easily accessible from every home. All neighborhoods will include a mix of housing typologies, including apartment mansions, live/work units, townhouses, cottages, courtyard houses and compounds.

The town center, which will be visible from popular State Route 9, will serve as a major asset to residents and an attraction for visitors. The size of the existing market in the region and the new town will demand warrant large-scale retail development, and so the area will include some Big Box stores on the periphery, and then will transition into a pedestrianoriented, mixed-use Main Street. Outdoor spaces, including a water park and several squares will also be a prominent part of the Main Street experience.

Trails allowing for pedestrian connectivity will also be a major asset to the community, and will give residents additional opportunity to enjoy southwest Utah’s stunning landscape and temperate climate. Designed for bikers, joggers and equestrians, the trails will connect Elim Valley’s various communities, while traversing natural settings, parks, and residential spaces. Though intended primarily for recreation, these trails will ultimately become an integral part of the site’s overall thoroughfare network.

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  #35  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2006, 12:11 PM
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Medical/Healthcare
St George/Washington County, UT

In the St.George area, where the population is over 150,000+ and climbing dramatically, the availability of health care is more than adequate and the quality surprisingly high. Because Utah's Dixie is less than a day's drive from the sprawling hospitals of urban centers such as Salt Lake City, Las Vegas and Los Angeles, the demand here didn't intensify until the population explosion of the last 10 years. Today, the St. George area has well-equipped facilities with physicians trained in most of the standard specialties.

Dixie Regional Medical Center
1380 East Medical Center Drive and 544 South 400 East, St. George
www.ihc.com



The recently opened Dixie Regional Medical Center (DRMC) River Road Campus, continues a local heritage of healing in a hospital setting that spans nearly a century. "It's an exciting, historic time for health care in this region," says L. Steven Wilson, CEO and Administrator of DRMC. Washington County has made great advances in health care, including the addition of a world class heart program at the new DRMC River Road campus.

The two campus hospital provides a great environment of care for the treatment of most illnesses and surgical procedures and is licensed for 196 beds -- 132 at River Road and 64 at 400 East. Strong emphasis is also placed on prevention and wellness programs through hospital-sponsored health fairs, educational seminars, and other community partnerships and outreach efforts.

In addition to open-heart surgery and other cardiac services, DRMC River Road Campus hosts the community's emergency department and most other acute care medical and/or surgical inpatient procedures.

The hospital features 108 inpatient beds, 24 critical care beds, 12 outpatient beds, eight operating rooms and an imaging center with CT-scanning, MRI, angiography and other general radiography services.


IHC is Ranked Number One Integrated Health Care System

DRMC's parent company, Intermountain Health Care (IHC), has been ranked the number one integrated health care system in the nation five of the past six years by Verispan, an independent research firm. DRMC is the largest private employer in Washington County with more than 1,700 employees. The new hospital added approximately 400 jobs to the local economy. The average wage paid to employees when the new campus is fully operational, is estimated to be $41,262 or about 58 percent higher than the average wage in Washington County of $23,973.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

IHC Health Center
577 S River Rd
435-688-6300

You will find an InstaCare facility, imaging services, physical therapy, the Workmed center and a full service pharmacy at the IHC Health Center located on River Road. InstaCare treats illness and injuries that are urgent, but not life threatening.

Snow Canyon Clinic
272 E Center, Ivins
www.snowcanyonclinic.com
435-673-7617

Ivins' Snow Canyon Clinic provides southern Utah with the highest level of comprehensive health care for every member of the family. Snow Canyon Clinic is a multi-specialty Clinic, providing a wide range of medical services from routine care in family practice, internal medicine and dental clinics to specialty evaluation, diagnosis and treatment in their neurology, sleep disorders, cancer and infusion clinics.

The imaging center features the newest and most technically advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. Its enhanced features enable them to provide state-of-the art "virtual" cardiac and vessel imaging as well as endoscopy without compromising patient comfort. Comprehensive OB/GYN and vascular ultrasonography services as well as X-ray services are available.


The Doctor's Free Clinic

The Doctor's Free Clinic provides medical care at no cost to citizens who cannot pay. It is supported by various local agencies and organizations. It is said that true greatness of a community can be measured by its kindness to those who are the least fortunate within it.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------





For more information






ST GEORGE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 97 E ST GEORGE BLVD, ST GEORGE, UT 84770
Phone: 435-628-1658 E-mail - hotspot@stgeorgechamber.com BACK TO HOME PAGE

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  #36  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2006, 12:32 PM
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Thumbs up Recently expanded Entrada project












In the heart of Southern Utah's red rock country, Entrada at Snow Canyon Country Club has made its mark with a unique blend of elegant homesites and leisure activities centered around a world-class golf course. Stretched across 710 acres of desert landscape against a backdrop of sandstone cliffs, rolling dunes, black lava beds and rugged arroyos, Entrada features the amenities and lifestyle that has earned accolades from members and visitors alike. Building on a brief but distinctive history, Entrada offers an exciting future -- and extraordinary opportunities as it evolves into a completely private club in the next few years.

This is the place where a thousand years ago the Anasazi walked and talked and laughed and cried. Where a thousand years before that , the last of lava flows crept across the broken land. It is a place where the water, wind and time of a million millennia have left their artful mark. The stories of this place are what gives it life. The Journey Begins...





The dramatic 22,000 square foot main clubhouse, opened for member use in 2005, is the focal point of Club activities. The clubhouse is the latest masterpiece of award-winning architect William Zmistowski Design Group of Boulder, CO. Some of their previous designs include Sherwood Country Club, Desert Highlands Golf Club and Country Club at Castle Pines. The clubhouse includes a restaurant and lounge, large outdoor dining patio, a private dining room, and golf locker rooms exclusively for Equity Members. The lower level of the clubhouse includes a golf shop, banquet and meeting rooms, a snack bar and cart storage area.



Entrada (Spanish for "entrance") sits at the foot of jagged Navajo and Kayenta sandstone cliffs near the mouth of Snow Canyon. Rolling Dunes, ancient black lava beds and winding arroyos mark this chaotic landscape in St. George, Utah, just a two-hour drive from Las Vegas.

A sense of time and place have converged at Entrada, where water, wind, and the forces of time have left an artful impression. The course is built upon 710 acres of strikingly beautiful southwest Utah desert.The spectacular Johnny Miller Signature Golf Course is the featured amenity of the Entrada development.

Troon Golf entered into a management agreement with Entrada at Snow Canyon Country Club to manage their facilities. Troon Golf has built a reputation as a leader in upscale golf facilities with impeccable playing conditions and exceptional customer service. As a member of a Troon facility, you can take advantage of reduced rates at other Troon properties.

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  #37  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 2:35 AM
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wow.. that elim project is huge!
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Now is a fantastic time to refinance or buy a house! Rates are lower than ever! If you are in Utah, PM me if you are interested to see how much you can save or afford.
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Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 4:02 AM
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What threw me is the style of the whole thing. It's like some kind of Spanish/Florentine dreamscape. Wow, and who would have thunk little ol Hurricane,Utah. Although, the surrounding scenery is perfect for something like this.Really incredible scenery...................


Last edited by delts145; Nov 15, 2006 at 9:09 PM.
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  #39  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 1:58 PM
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Cingular expands service in St. George metro!

Cingular to offer wireless with services in St. George

Cingular Wireless said has launched wireless service in the greater St. George area.
The company is selling service to customers with three locations operated by Spring Communications: Zion's Factory Outlet Mall, the Red Cliffs Mall and 1091 N. Bluff St.
Nine new cell sites, will provide coverage from I-15 into St. George, Ivins, Santa Clara, Washington, Toquerville, LaVerkin and Hurricane, all in Washington County.
Cingular, a joint venture between AT&T Inc. and BellSouth Corp., has 54.1 million customers, making it the largest wireless carrier in the U.S.
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  #40  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 8:41 PM
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Just a little photo teaser bumper upper.



St. George could soon be larger than Salt Lake proper!
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