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  #61  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 1:03 PM
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Consider Weber State University land purchase.






By Ann Millner and Richard E. Kendell

During a series of public meetings and information sessions in the past month, the greater Ogden community has had an opportunity to learn more about developer Chris Peterson's proposed plans for Ogden's east bench.
As many of you know, Mr. Peterson is interested in acquiring land from the city of Ogden and Weber State University to pursue his plans for a new housing development and year-round resort in Malan's Basin.
The concepts shared at these information sessions present some big decisions for the university and community. We personally believe it's the most significant decision Weber State has considered since purchasing the land to relocate the campus on Harrison Boulevard in the early 1950s.
As a public university, any decision to sell or exchange land would involve a review at both the university and state level. Keep in mind that Weber State property is held by the Utah State Board of Regents in the name of the university. Traditionally, WSU and higher education in general have focused on trying to acquire property to accommodate future growth.
A review of past WSU enrollment data and the Board of Regents projections for future growth underscore the necessity of having available land for future campus expansion. Twenty years ago, Weber State's enrollment stood at 11,366 students. In 1996, it was 13,906. Today the university has an enrollment of 18,334 with a projected 25,790 students by 2026. Extrapolating on those figures, WSU will double its current enrollment by 2054. That's an important consideration when our Ogden campus is quickly approaching build-out.
While the university has participated in past property transactions that involved the sale or trade of very small parcels of land that met the needs of the school, the amount of acreage involved in this request is extraordinary. If you consider that the Ogden campus sits on approximately 400 square acres, this request for approximately 150 acres represents more than a third of the overall campus.
Two buildings housing key campus support services are located on the land in question, east of Skyline Drive. In addition to being used for science instruction and field studies, the property also houses a water retention facility for campus irrigation and a par course. While the current 20-year master plan shows a footprint for only one additional service building, this land would be critical for future development during the next 20-50 years.
Many people have inquired about the process we'll use to evaluate a formal proposal from Mr. Peterson.
We are assembling a study group composed of university constituents, including faculty, staff, students, trustees and officials from state agencies. This volunteer advisory body will be involved with fact-finding and information gathering. This group will develop criteria for making a decision. We envision an opportunity to share their findings and recommendations at open campus meetings.
Ultimately, a recommendation would be made to the Board of Trustees and forwarded to the Board of Regents. The final decision will rest with the Board of Regents.
A hasty decision of this magnitude would be a disservice. But a deliberative, thorough process will enable us to arrive at a final decision that will be best for the long-term future of Weber State University.
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Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 1:14 PM
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Thumbs up Ogden Scowcroft Building gets Historic Tax Credits and Silver LEED Rating.



Since rehab, the sun has shone brightly on Scowcroft. Let's hope it spreads to other buildings in Ogden's Warehouse Historic District.

Building Name: Scowcroft Building
Location: Wall Avenue at 23rd Street, Ogden
Date of Contruction: 1906


Threat Status
Rehabilitated



Scowcroft's interior atrium well.

Preservation Issues
This innovative project involved restoring the long-vacant and derelict Scowcroft Warehouse—using historic tax credits to make the project more economically feasible. The design included both LEED certification and remediation of environmentally hazardous materials as well as historic preservation and sensitive design of the site and the building’s exterior and interior. The building’s exterior was carefully restored and features a new, architecturally compatible entry on the east side.

According to Barbara Murphy of the State Historic Preservation Office, “the Scowcroft Warehouse is one of the most architecturally significant buildings in Ogden’s warehouse area. This project is remarkable for the vision, cooperation and creativity exhibited by numerous agencies and individuals who understood the potential of this vacant warehouse and restored it to a fully occupied and viable building.”

The LEED Green Building Rating System is a voluntary, national standard that the US Green Building Council developed to define “green building” by establishing a common standard of measurement. LEED provides a complete framework for assessing building performance and meeting sustainability goals. LEED identifies strategies for site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality. The Scowcroft Buildings “silver” designation was announced by USGBC last week.

Allen Roberts, AIA Lead Architect of the project for Cooper Roberts Simonsen Architects said, “The project is an excellent example of ‘green preservation,’ a blending of the values and methods of historic preservation with those of the sustainability or ‘green’ movement. The use of non-invasive ‘wall coring’ technology seismically upgraded the building without altering the exterior or interior of the perimeter masonry walls, thus preserving the historic fabric.”

Preserving most of the Scowcroft Building’s historic exterior was the key to qualifying for both historic tax credits as well as LEED certification. By reusing the existing shell, the designers preserved the integrity of original design, as well as minimized the need for the manufacture and shipping of new materials.

Mayor Matthew Godfrey of Ogden said, “the project protects critical lands, promotes air quality, and water conservation. It also contributes to the overall sense of community by encouraging a heightened level of business and social interaction. The Scowcroft building is an excellent example of how vision and good planning can promote re-use of existing buildings to revitalize and beautify a community.”



Top Right Architectural Detail Photo: Brian Griffin, Griffin PhotoDesign
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  #63  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2006, 2:50 PM
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Mass-transit vision will help Utahns

By John Florez


Gridlock, not vision! That was the answer Vancouver transit people gave when I asked how they had the vision to create such an efficient and user-friendly transportation system. That was in 1983 when we, as UTA board members, were considering the creation of light rail that is now TRAX. FLEXTRANS, designed to assist those with disabilities, was also part of the system.
Vancouver's system included an elaborate and synchronized array of buses, light rail and ferryboats. They said they had no choice but to change, as they did not have the luxury of the federal highway system the United States had created. Their city was laid out in a grid with automobiles inching along the city streets. Organizations move by one of two ways: leadership or crisis. It was the gridlock crisis that moved them. They found that wherever light rail was built, the area became revitalized with business and people.
Twenty-three years later, we have city-, county- and state-elected officials putting their parochial interests aside to create a common vision to deal with the problem of moving a growing population across the Wasatch Front. They, along with business and community leaders, have created Proposition 3, which brings the vision to the public for its consideration.
It is encouraging when elected officials put their vested interests aside to use their political capital for the public good. At a time when many politicians cannot see or do not care about anything beyond their political boundaries, they understood that doing nothing was no longer an option as they saw the problems of urban growth unfold along the Wasatch Front. They realized the problems of communities transcend artificial boundaries — the air we breathe, the water we drink and how we live, work, play together. Fortunately, they have focused their priorities on what is in the public's interest.
What is little understood is how getting from one place to another affects our relationships between families and communities. I often wonder how many families ask their loved ones to call them as they drive to work and breathe a sigh of relief when they get the call. Commuter rail will open up greater employment opportunities between communities and make it possible for family members to spend more time together. Can you imagine living in Provo and working in Ogden without the worry of traveling? Can you imagine how it would make it possible for people in West Valley City to work in Salt Lake City, or how this would help the west side of Salt Lake City become revitalized?
UTA's leaders have been consistent and focused on their mission. They never forgot they were in the business of moving people, not running a bus system. It is that kind of philosophy that has allowed UTA to work effectively with the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) and other entities responsible for moving people and bringing communities together. It has been key in molding a culture among leaders that has been a driving force in working for the public good rather than parochial interests. Furthermore, we now have leaders who have provided a vision for us to support on Nov. 7 rather than waiting for a crisis to make us move.
Thanks to the local leaders of today who have shown what good things can happen when people come together.




Utah native John Florez has founded several Hispanic civil rights organizations, served on the staff of Sen. Orrin Hatch and on more than 45 state, local and volunteer boards. He also has been deputy assistant secretary of labor. E-MAIL: jdflorez@comcast.net
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  #64  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2006, 3:08 PM
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More of beautiful,historic,downtown Ogden


Last edited by delts145; Nov 19, 2006 at 3:17 PM.
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  #65  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2006, 11:54 PM
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  #66  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2006, 12:01 AM
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Ogden city does have some nice projects going on right now. where did you found that page delts?
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  #67  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2006, 12:13 AM
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I found it by accident. It was on a page for the promotion of Ogden ski resort's. Go to the Resort's thread. The post with the Wolf Creek development.
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  #68  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2006, 2:52 PM
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Post Outdoor products added as an economic cluster

One of several important outdoor sporting companies moving headquarters to Ogden, Utah



State officials have added outdoor products and recreation to their list of "economic clusters," or industry sectors the state will give special focus to for economic development.
Among the reasons cited for the addition is that several winter sports companies have moved or announced moves of at least some of their operations to Ogden; the move of the headquarters of U.S. Speedskating, the sport's national governing body, from Ohio to Utah to be near the Olympic Oval; the state serving as the site of the semi-annual Outdoor Retailer convention; and the state's five national parks and 41 state recreation sites.
The state government Web site lists the following as clusters: life sciences, software development and information technology, aerospace, financial services, energy and natural resources, and "competitive accelerators."
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Old Posted Dec 4, 2006, 3:00 PM
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Wednesday, November, 2006

By Rachel J. Trotter
Standard-Examiner correspondent


Historic Country Boy Dairy sign


Historic 25th Street

NORTH OGDEN -- Commercial development is definitely on the rise in North Ogden.
Developer Ron Hancock proposed a concept plan to the city that would turn 40 acres of undeveloped land around Country Boy Dairy, 1700 N. Washington Blvd., into commercial property.

If the city decides to annex the 40 acres, Hancock has plans to develop two big-box stores, several restaurants and at least a strip mall and office space.

The city will look at the annexation petition Nov. 14.

"I wanted to bring this to you to see what you think, if you are interested," Hancock told the City Council during a recent meeting.

Hancock's family owns Country Boy Dairy, which has been an active dairy until recently.

"We are not using the space for a dairy any more and wanted to look into other things," Hancock said. This past year, he started developing other land in the area for homes.

The immediate concept plan would allow for the actual retail Country Boy Dairy site to stay in place, along with the adjacent residence where Hancock's mother lives.

Hancock would use Washington Boulevard as the main access, an issue he discussed with Utah Department of Transportation officials when they did a corridor preservation study last year.

"They said they would allow for some access," he said.

City Councilman Steve Huntsman approves of Hancock's plan.

"I think this is a good place with access to Washington. I'd like to see more retail off the beaten path like this concept."

According to a map given to the city, most of Hancock's acreage is off Washington Boulevard and behind the dairy. Only a few blocks of space are on Washington, but Hancock believes that will work for access.

There is already an access point with a driveway, but he said he is unsure about what would happen if that property changes to commercial.

Hancock has been talking with some commercial businesses, but said he is not ready to name any potential tenants.

However, he said he hopes to have the area annexed into the city so development can break ground by spring.

City Councilwoman Martha Harris said, "These are exciting times for our city."

Hancock said the commercial and residential development to the west and south "would be a nice legacy for our family."

Last edited by delts145; Dec 4, 2006 at 3:19 PM.
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Old Posted Dec 9, 2006, 8:14 AM
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Thumbs up Fresenius expanding, adds 700 new jobs

Associated Press

OGDEN — Fresenius Medical Care, a provider of dialysis products, will be adding up to 700 new jobs with a $200 million plant expansion.


Aerial view of current Ogden plant

The expansion will add up to 500,000 square feet, increasing the size of its production facility to more than 1 million square feet on the north side of the city. Fresenius already has 1,300 workers there.
The Weber school board voted to allow the company to have 12.6 acres. The school district will move its maintenance and transportation offices elsewhere.
"In brotherhood between Weber School District and Ogden city, we are willing to make the move. It will cost our taxpayers nothing," said Drew Wilson, the district's facilities director.
The Governor's Office of Economic Development has agreed to provide financial incentives for Fresenius, including a refund of up to 30 percent of state taxes over 10 years.
Fresenius, based in Germany, has 2,085 dialysis clinics in North America, Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa, according to the company's Web site.
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Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 7:33 PM
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Overview of Odgen City redevelopment projects

Odgen City's redevelopment page.

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  #72  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2006, 2:43 PM
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Post Gondolas big fun or big flops, Ogden study finds

Gondolas big fun or big flops, Ogden study finds
By Kristen Moulton
The Salt Lake Tribune

Article Last Updated:12/15/2006 12:35:48 AM MST



The Canyons Ski Resort

OGDEN - Gondolas and trams have been both colossal failures and tourist magnets, a survey conducted for the Ogden City Council has found.
The council asked its communications specialist to identify urban gondola or tram systems so it will be better informed when Mayor Matthew Godfrey proposes a city gondola that would be funded, in part, by the sale of the Mount Ogden Golf Course.
Godfrey envisions a four-mile-long gondola running from downtown to the east-side foothills near Weber State University. There, it would link to a mountain gondola to a proposed ski resort in remote Malans Basin above the city.
The council decided not to travel to Telluride, Colo., to ride the 10-year-old gondola that carries more than 2 million people per year.
“It seemed a bit premature,” said Amy Wicks, the council's vice chair.
The comparisons of three cable-ways that have been tried in the United States and one in Colombia in South America revealed a variety of experiences - from the failure of MART, built for the 1984 New Orleans World Fair, to the success of the gondola linking Telluride to the Mountain Village above.
The study also looked at the tram now under construction and far over budget in Portland, Ore., as well as a gondola proposed for Baltimore and a tram suggested to link Philadelphia with Camden, N.J.
Trams and gondolas are both considered aerial cableways, but a trams are much larger. Only two trams are carried on aerial cables, while dozens of gondolas are carried that way.
The biggest flop listed in the survey was the $8 million Mississippi Aerial Rapid Transit system, which carried riders over the river during the World's Fair. Even at its peak, ridership was half the projected 1.7 million, and developers could not attract enough riders to pay for operational costs.
The gondola linking Telluride to the Mountain Village area, in place for a decade, has been a success even though only 3,500 people live in the area. Tourists make up the bulk of the 2 million-plus riders every year.
Opponents of Godfrey's vision say a streetcar would make more sense for central Ogden.

Last edited by delts145; Dec 15, 2006 at 2:52 PM.
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  #73  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 2:01 PM
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Post Barnes awarded $10 million incentive.

This would be another great coup for Ogden if it happens. I continue to be impressed with the Huntsman administration and the way it does business.

Funds an enticement for firm to stay in Utah and significantly expand operations.

By Brice Wallace
Deseret Morning News
An aerospace company was awarded a $10.1 million incentive Friday to entice it to move its current facility, relocate out-of-state manufacturing operations to Utah and add 900 new jobs over 20 years rather than move operations to Singapore.
The Governor's Office of Economic Development Board approved the incentives for Barnes Aerospace.
"They do high-end manufacturing of titanium and aerospace structures and making things for military aircraft," said board member Mark Howell. "These are really good-type jobs that bring good skills to the people who have those jobs."
The company would receive $1 million from the Industrial Assistance Fund — half upon completing the move of its existing Ogden facility into the Business Depot Ogden and half upon completing a relocation to Utah of an out-of-state manufacturing operation. It also could receive a tax rebate of up to $2.1 million over the first 10 years of the deal, contingent on paying new employees at least 170 percent of the Weber County median wage.
The IAF money can be recovered by the state if the expansion is not open for business by the end of 2008 or if new state revenue over the life of the project is insufficient to justify the combined incentives provided by the state, board documents state.
Over the next five years, the company could get another rebate of up to $3 million based on the creation of 600 net new jobs, compared with the previous decade. The five years after that, it could get a rebate of up to $4 million based on 300 more new jobs.
"Their biggest problem is they're out of space" in Ogden, board Chairman David Simmons said. "They can't grow in their existing facility and they want to bring more work in here. ... This is right in the sweet spot of what we want to incent."
Barnes Aerospace had sought $3.2 million in IAF money to move to BDO and $7.5 million to expand the Ogden facility. Board documents say the relocations would result in Ogden retaining 145 existing jobs and that the company's capital investment is expected to be $12 million.
Business Depot Ogden/Ogden City has offered a $1.6 million incentive in the form of $100,000 in free rent in an existing building while the new facility is constructed, $500,000 in free land and $1 million in no-cost building improvements.
But Singapore has put out an offer for Barnes that features a seven-year tax-free structure and a 20 percent corporate tax incentive. Utah officials said the Singapore offer is estimated at $20 million to $30 million.
Barnes Aerospace, based in Windsor, Conn., produces machined and fabricated components and assemblies for aircraft engine and airframe builders and does component overhauls and repairs for commercial airlines and the military.
Barnes Aerospace is a primary business of Barnes Group Inc., which was founded in 1857 and is based in Bristol, Conn. It has three businesses with a total of about 4,000 workers at more than 40 locations worldwide. Under the Associated Spring Corp. name, the company went public in 1946, began being listed on the New York Stock Exchange in 1963 and switched to its current name in 1976.
Jeff Edwards, president and chief executive officer of the Economic Development Corp. of Utah, described the Barnes Aerospace incentive approved Friday as "a great use of the (incentive) program."
"I really think this is an outstanding example of how this incentive should be used," he said. "This is a post-performance rebate program that is helping to incent a specific employer to do a specific thing. I think the way that the structure of this is put together is very well thought-out."
The GOED board on Friday also approved an incentive of up to $300,000 in IAF money for Smith Sport Optics to upgrade its Clearfield facility, retain 201 jobs and create 64 new jobs. The manufacturer and distributor of ski goggles would receive half the money after the facility is upgraded and half after the jobs are added, at $2,500 per job. It must commit to stay in operation in Utah for 10 years and pay new workers 137 percent of the Davis County median.
Smith has a manufacturing agreement with DFG in Clearfield and is pursuing an acquisition of the company. It plans to move accounting and customer service positions to Clearfield. Without the incentive, Smith would probably close the Clearfield DFG facility and move out of Utah, board documents indicate, with Denver and Texas also trying to land the operations.
Smith Sports Optics was founded in 1970 and its current parent company is Safilo SpA.


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  #74  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2006, 10:55 PM
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Ogden Best Western recognized for design

Before Pic


After Pics



Best Western International announced that the Best Western High Country Inn in Ogden was named 2006 Best of the Best Design award winner for outstanding design renovation.
Judging was based on standards established and used by the American Society of Interior Design to assess interior and exterior design work. Winners are chosen from each of the hotel's North American regions, from which an overall winner is chosen.
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  #75  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2006, 12:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmilingBob View Post
Odgen City's redevelopment page.

Even Ogden has alot going on.
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Old Posted Dec 21, 2006, 12:59 AM
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Other then just building projects going on Ogdan's freeway is getting a facelifted. Here's an update on that..............


31st South Exit in Ogden Closed Until Tomorrow Morning
December 20th, 2006 @ 5:20pm


Southbound I-15 is closed between 21st Street and 31st Street this hour after UDOT crews grew concerned about the stability of a bridge set to be demolished.

A massive pile of concrete and metal debris now sits on top of I-15. Traffic was passing over the south side of this bridge as recently as yesterday. Demolition was planned for tonight, but prep work apparently weakened the structure.

Andy Neff, UDOT spokesman: "The beams were beginning to buckle slightly. We didn't have anything fall on the freeway, but to bear on the side of safety, rather than risk an accident, we believe it was in the best interest of the traveling public to close it and move ahead with the demolition".

Crews are hoping to have the freeway reopened by tomorrow morning.

They're diverting traffic to off-ramps before the the 31st Street exits, and then back onto I-15 South after the 21st Street on-ramp.
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  #77  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2007, 12:32 AM
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Some Ogden news

Minor-League Team Proposes Park Expansion in Ogden
January 4th, 2007 @ 2:45pm

OGDEN, Utah (AP) -- The Ogden Raptors are a hot ticket. The team is proposing a $3 million expansion at Lindquist Field that would raise the number of seats to as many as 6,500. The Raptors play in the Pioneer League and are affiliated with the Los Angeles Dodgers. They averaged more than 3,500 fans last season. City planners recommended approval yesterday and sent the plan to Ogden's mayor. The team and city would share the cost of the project.
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Old Posted Jan 5, 2007, 3:52 PM
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Good news for Ogden! The Raptors and their ballpark are trememdous assets for the city. I would love to see renderings.
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Old Posted Jan 8, 2007, 3:36 PM
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City of Logan wants a downtown hotel.

I wasn't sure what would be the best thread to put this story in. Odgan is
about the closest to Logan.


Logan: Merchants clamoring for downtown hotel
But the mayor is backing a plan to build a conference center and lodging to the south
By Kristen Moulton
The Salt Lake Tribune
Article Last Updated: 01/08/2007 01:11:21 AM MST

It has been almost five years since Logan - with much fanfare - staged a round of brainstorming sessions to come up with a long-range plan for its quaint and yet far-too-quiet downtown.
One of the key goals of "The Future for Downtown Logan" was to bring in a conference center and hotel. Such a magnet would be the catalyst for rejuvenating a historic district that for decades has suffered a loss of foot traffic.
That never happened, and now downtown merchants are livid with Logan Mayor Randy Watts for his reluctance to embrace a Marriott hotel that investors wanted to build on a prominent downtown corner.
Instead, Watts is sticking by the decisions of the previous mayor,
Doug Thompson, and City Council to encourage Wasatch Property Management to build a conference center and hotel seven blocks south of the city center.
"That train has left the station," Logan City Attorney Kymber Housley declared Friday.
Watts said it would make no sense to drop the developer, Wasatch Property, in what he called "the eleventh hour."
"We've gone through this whole thing for five years, and now we have the person with the money and the property," the mayor said.
All parties agree Logan is not yet big enough for two high-class hotels. And emotions are high in part because Wasatch Properties has applied to become a Marriott franchisee at
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its south Logan site.
"It's sad. It really and truly is," said Lynn Hicken, co-owner of the men's clothing store - Kater Shop - and another downtown business. "Our city fathers lack the vision to do something that could revitalize downtown."
Gene Needham, a member of the board of Logan Downtown Alliance and co-owner of S.E. Needham Jewelers, calls it "absurd" that the city is allowing its conference center to go up south of the historic downtown.
Not only does Wasatch Property's site have traffic challenges because there is no stoplight nearby on the busy U.S. 89-91 that is Logan's Main Street, it's a long hike to Logan's downtown restaurants, shops, performing-arts center and LDS Tabernacle, he said.
"Truly they are putting it in the wrong place. The city is attempting to fill a blighted location with the gem of our tourist effort."
Needham is hopeful downtown merchants can persuade Wasatch Properties' Dell Loy Hansen to shift gears and build his hotel on the corner of 200 North.
That site is too small for a conference center, but the center could be built about a block away on a vacant parcel owned by Cache County, across the street from the new state courthouse, Needham argues.
The Logan Downtown Alliance made its case in a press release issued Friday.
Wasatch Properties, in its own statement Friday, said its $60 million project already under way at 700 S. Main St. "will benefit the vitality of downtown and Logan City overall."
The Logan-based company, which owns office buildings in several states, already explored the option of building downtown, but there was not a site large enough, the company said in its statement.
Wasatch Properties needs a minimum of 15 acres for its office building - now under construction seven blocks to the south - a retail building, restaurant, parking for 600, hotel with 119 rooms and conference center with at least 20,000 square feet, the company said.
Further, the developer has no interest in separating the hotel from the conference center, as the downtown merchants suggest.
"Our studies confirm that it would be a fatal mistake," the company said.
One of the bones downtown merchants have to pick with Watts is that for the past year, he has told them he would listen to any proposals for the corner of 200 South and Main Street, which the city owns and which the previous administration wanted for government use. The tire store there closed last spring, though a title company remains in office space.
At a Dec. 14 meeting with the mayor, however, it quickly became clear to the investors - who own other Utah Marriott properties and who the merchants wooed to the city - that the new mayor is committed to the success of Wasatch Properties' hotel and conference center, not one downtown. The meeting ended abruptly.
The investors, who could not be reached for comment, are no longer pursuing the Logan site, Needham said.
Housley describes the concept he and the mayor were given that day as "too nebulous to take serious"- a suggestion the merchants reject.
For his part, Watts said he believes downtown is close enough that it will benefit from the conference center, which will be served by shuttle buses.
Needham acknowledges that merchants should have been louder in their opposition 14 months ago when the City Council, acting as the Redevelopment Agency board, approved tax-increment financing - essentially a $4.8 million property tax rebate - to Wasatch Properties.
His own brother and business partner, Joe Needham, was among the council members who approved the incentive.
"We probably could have and should have done more at the time," Gene Needham said Friday.
kmoulton@sltrib.com



I've only been to Logan a few times but the city has a nice main street feel with old buildings and green space with there temple and parks. They better keep all there old buildngs on main street.
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1. "Wells Fargo Building" 24-stories 422 FT 1998
2. "LDS Church Office Building" 28-stories 420 FT 1973
3. "111 South Main" 24-stories 387 FT 2016
4. "99 West" 30-stories 375 FT 2011
5. "Key Bank Tower" 27-stories 351 FT 1976
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  #80  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 1:05 AM
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Utaaah! Utaaah! is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2005
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Good news for Odgen...

Ogden landmark: American Can sale is a sealed deal
Amer Sports Corp., which sells skiing and diving gear, is lined up as the first tenant
By Kristen Moulton
The Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake Tribune
Article Last Updated:01/13/2007 12:19:58 AM MST

OGDEN - The American Can buildings in downtown Ogden, a massive complex of historic structures that were vacant for decades, have a new owner and are close to getting their first business tenant.
But the tenant will not be a high-tech company, as Ogden envisioned when the city pitched the idea of a High Tech Center to the Utah Legislature five years ago and won $900,000 in state funding to buy the buildings.
Instead, American Can will become home to Amer Sports Corp.'s Winter & Outdoor Americas unit, which sells Salomon and Atomic skis, as well as Suunto watches and other diving instruments.
Company president and Salt Lake City native Mike Dowse said this week that he hopes to move in by early to mid-summer, bringing up to 130 jobs to Ogden, including roughly 40 current employees who now work in Oregon, New Hampshire and California.
Jon Peddie, a developer in Steamboat Springs, Colo., said he acquired the bulk of the American Can property - all but the building that houses DaVinci Academy of Sciences and the Arts - late Friday afternoon. He declined to reveal the purchase price.
Amer Sports will be the first to lease space - a 58,000 square-foot building on the western side of the property along Lincoln Avenue.
Dowse said reusing a historic structure - American Can structures were built from 1914 to 1920 as a cannery for northern Utah's then-thriving vegetable farms - fits well with his company's ethics, and he plans to use the basement for a bicycle garage to encourage employees to pedal to work.
"One of the reasons we're coming to Ogden is, we see the mayor's vision," said Dowse.
Mayor Matthew Godfrey has spent the past two years promoting Ogden as the West's new recreational hub, with nearby ski resorts, two rivers and mountains.
The pitch has worked, where the mayor's previous attempt to lure high-technology companies did not.
Amer Sports, headquartered in Finland, is the 11th - and largest - recreational company to relocate to Ogden in fewer than two years.
Godfrey said earlier this week that he hopes high-tech companies will move to Ogden once the city's cachet as a recreational hub is evident.
When Godfrey went to the Legislature in 2002, he described a technology, educational and research campus that would have high school and college students collaborating with technical experts, professors and successful entrepreneurs.
The American Can buildings were purchased in 2004, but tenants have been hard to find.
Today's vision for the American Can complex still includes technology, but to a lesser degree.
Dave Harmer, the city's director of economic development, said the city's Business Information Center, which supports small business, will move there, and the city is hoping to lure an Ogden-based venture fund, as well as Weber State University's small-business center.
The charter school already in one American Can building - DaVinci Academy of Science and the Arts - emphasizes science.
Peddie, the Colorado developer, said he will work with Salt Lake City and Ogden brokers to fill up the space - about 170,000 square feet after Amer Sports is finished.
"We would like to see high-tech there. At the same time, you know, we'd like to see somebody there."
He has not ruled out the possibility of loft apartments above offices in the taller buildings.
Peddie said he's considering whether to use the boiler building next to the old American Can smokestack as a public space of some sort.
"It might be donated to some user that could manage it for public functions."
Peddie acquired the buildings from Ogden Community Foundation, which, shortly before the closing, took possession of the property from a business consortium that had owned American Can since mid-2004. The foundation is a nonprofit created by Ogden City to receive gifts and grants, Harmer said.
Amer Sports is getting tax-rebate incentives worth nearly $8 million from the Governor's Office of Economic Development to come to Utah.
kmoultonsltrib.com


What has to happen?

* The Ogden City Council, acting as the city's Redevelopment Agency Board, will have to ink a development agreement with the new owner of the property, Colorado developer Jon Peddie.

How the buildings will be used

* Although Amer Sports has said it could eventually employ 230 in Ogden for its ski and diving-instrument business, current plans are for 120 to 130 jobs in Ogden, including about a dozen at a repair center at Business Depot Ogden, located north of downtown.
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