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  #81  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 1:40 AM
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That's good news for downtown Odgen. It will help the downtown area out and bring more workers and people to that area.
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2. "LDS Church Office Building" 28-stories 420 FT 1973
3. "111 South Main" 24-stories 387 FT 2016
4. "99 West" 30-stories 375 FT 2011
5. "Key Bank Tower" 27-stories 351 FT 1976
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  #82  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 3:48 PM
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Farmington sets sights on doubling of its retail

Work progressing on complex planned next to rail station
By Nicole Warburton
Deseret Morning News
Work is once again progressing on a high-end retail development to center around a commuter-rail station in the southwest corner of Farmington in Davis County.
Architect's rendering of proposed Station Park development in Farmington shows a mix of shops, housing and office spaces. (Rendering by Centercal Properties, LLC)
Rendering by Centercal Properties, LLC
Architect's rendering of proposed Station Park development in Farmington shows a mix of shops, housing and office spaces.
Station Park would add close to 1 million square feet of retail space to Farmington — more than doubling what the city already has.
Earlier this month, city officials signed off on a development agreement to allow a new owner to purchase the land where Station Park is to be built. The purchase should be completed by May, and work on roads and utilities within the project is likely to begin this fall, said Fred Bruning, president of CenterCal Properties.
The project is scheduled to be done sometime in 2009. When finished, Bruning anticipates that Station Park will become a destination point for shoppers in Davis County. The development is to have a mixture of small and large shops, housing and office spaces — similar to the Gateway mall in downtown Salt Lake City.
"The quality of what we build is a lot better than what exists there in Davis County," Bruning said in an interview Friday. "What you have is a lot of K-Marts. It's not quality in terms of the architecture and tenant mix."
The Station Park project aims to be pedestrian-friendly and have a good mix of shopping, housing and office space. The development also will be accessible by commuter rail.
The Utah Transit Authority is currently building a commuter-rail line from Salt Lake City to Pleasant View in Weber County. The line, and the stations, are expected to be finished in 2008.
Last summer, Farmington developer Rich Haws, the present owner of Station Park, decided to sell his development concept and several dozen acres planned for Station Park to CenterCal Properties. Before CenterCal agreed to purchase the land, however, it had to work out several issues with the development agreement for Station Park.
Top issues with the plan involved how to manage traffic in the area and provide access to Station Park. Farmington Mayor Scott Harbertson said Friday that he was pleased with the agreement, although he admitted that the city was stepping into new territory in terms of the scope and size of the development.
"This is the first time we've ever done anything like this," Harbertson said. "It's kind of a leap of faith, and you have to give a little latitude to the developer to build a project it feels is successful."
CenterCal Properties has worked on several large developments, including Jordan Landing in West Jordan. It has also done projects in California and Oregon that are centered around mass transit, similar to Station Park.
__________________
1. "Wells Fargo Building" 24-stories 422 FT 1998
2. "LDS Church Office Building" 28-stories 420 FT 1973
3. "111 South Main" 24-stories 387 FT 2016
4. "99 West" 30-stories 375 FT 2011
5. "Key Bank Tower" 27-stories 351 FT 1976
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  #83  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 6:10 PM
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Okay bud, this page needs a splash of color about now so let's just use your post as the excuse.



Ehhhh, let's stick a cool icon in here too.............

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  #84  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 6:44 PM
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Good call delts. That is a very colorful rending.
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1. "Wells Fargo Building" 24-stories 422 FT 1998
2. "LDS Church Office Building" 28-stories 420 FT 1973
3. "111 South Main" 24-stories 387 FT 2016
4. "99 West" 30-stories 375 FT 2011
5. "Key Bank Tower" 27-stories 351 FT 1976
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  #85  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 9:12 PM
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The DNews article above included a new site plan for Station Park:


It distinctly mentions residential along the main retail "street".
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  #86  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 12:31 PM
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Ogden Gondola: Developer could own, operate it; city might not sell golf course
By Kristen Moulton

The Salt Lake Tribune



Chris Peterson, who wants to build a resort in the mountains above Ogden and a gondola to reach the resort, may make "significant" changes in his proposal before formally filing it with Ogden City this winter, Mayor Matthew Godfrey said Monday.
Godfrey, in a meeting with The Salt Lake Tribune's editorial board, said Peterson may not buy the Mount Ogden Golf Course, as previously envisioned, and the developer may propose that he own - as well as operate - a gondola from downtown to the foothills.
"There may be some very significant changes in the next three weeks," Godfrey said. "We are looking at doing this without selling the golf course."
Peterson could not be reached Monday for comment.
The mayor said the developer has been revising his plan after listening to public comments made last spring in a series of forums that drew hundreds of residents.
Many residents in this northern Utah community of 78,000 - the mayor insists it's a majority - embrace the notion of a gondola from downtown linking to the foothills, where it would link up with a mountain gondola leading to Peterson's resort in Malans Basin.
Others object that the city should not sell one of its chief assets: a large swath of open space, including the golf course, in the foothills on the east side of the city.
As presented in forums last spring, Peterson wanted to buy the golf course and reconfigure it as part of a 400-home subdivision that would also cover about 50 acres of land now owned by the city above the golf course and 150 acres belonging to Weber State University.
The housing project, which would include a small commercial area where the urban and mountain gondolas would meet above WSU's campus, would provide the money for Peterson to build the resort and gondolas, he said.
Previously, the mayor has advocated that the city sell the golf course to Peterson and use the money to pay most of the costs of building a gondola that would run from downtown to the hillside above WSU.
The mayor said Monday that he had committed to raising $5 million from private sources toward the costs, with the golf-course sale providing the remaining $20 million to $25 million. Peterson would have operated the urban gondola for the city, linking it with his own mountain gondola.
The new idea - the mayor described it as "evolving" - is for Peterson to build, own and operate the urban gondola as well as the mountain gondola.
Peterson would strike an agreement with Utah Transit Authority so commuter-rail riders arriving in downtown Ogden would be able to transfer to Peterson's gondola to WSU without paying any more than they would pay for a bus ticket, Godfrey said.
FrontRunner commuter rail is due to reach Ogden next year.
Godfrey rejected the notion of allowing Ogden residents to vote - even in a nonbinding referendum - on the project he has described as the biggest thing to hit Ogden since the railroad in the 1800s.
It would set a precedent for the public to vote on even inconsequential decisions, subverting the democratic process, he said.
Godfrey did not rule out a city-sponsored poll, but said none is planned.
The mayor also said while Peterson's proposed resort would not "initially" connect to Snowbasin ski resort on the east side of the mountain, he's convinced the two resorts ultimately would link up.
"I don't think there's any doubt. It's my opinion the two will eventually connect."
A senior vice president for Snowbasin's owner, The Sinclair Companies, sent Godfrey a letter last spring asking him to stop saying there is a connection between the two resorts.
"The two resorts will not connect," Sinclair's Clint Ensign said in an interview.
The Sinclair Companies is owned by Earl Holding, Chris Peterson's father-in-law. Peterson formerly worked for the company.
He makes no claim that his resort will connect to Snowbasin, but has pointed out that it took Alta and Snowbird many years of operating as neighbors before they allowed skiers to pass between the resorts.

Last edited by delts145; Jan 16, 2007 at 1:13 PM.
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  #87  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by SLC Projects View Post
I wasn't sure what would be the best thread to put this story in. Ogden is
about the closest to Logan.


Logan: Merchants clamoring for downtown hotel
But the mayor is backing a plan to build a conference center and lodging to the south
By Kristen Moulton
The Salt Lake Tribune
Article Last Updated: 01/08/2007 01:11:21 AM MST

It has been almost five years since Logan - with much fanfare - staged a round of brainstorming sessions to come up with a long-range plan for its quaint and yet far-too-quiet downtown.
One of the key goals of "The Future for Downtown Logan" was to bring in a conference center and hotel. Such a magnet would be the catalyst for rejuvenating a historic district that for decades has suffered a loss of foot traffic.
That never happened, and now downtown merchants are livid with Logan Mayor Randy Watts for his reluctance to embrace a Marriott hotel that investors wanted to build on a prominent downtown corner.
Instead, Watts is sticking by the decisions of the previous mayor,
Doug Thompson, and City Council to encourage Wasatch Property Management to build a conference center and hotel seven blocks south of the city center.
"That train has left the station," Logan City Attorney Kymber Housley declared Friday.
Watts said it would make no sense to drop the developer, Wasatch Property, in what he called "the eleventh hour."
"We've gone through this whole thing for five years, and now we have the person with the money and the property," the mayor said.
All parties agree Logan is not yet big enough for two high-class hotels. And emotions are high in part because Wasatch Properties has applied to become a Marriott franchisee at
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its south Logan site.
"It's sad. It really and truly is," said Lynn Hicken, co-owner of the men's clothing store - Kater Shop - and another downtown business. "Our city fathers lack the vision to do something that could revitalize downtown."
Gene Needham, a member of the board of Logan Downtown Alliance and co-owner of S.E. Needham Jewelers, calls it "absurd" that the city is allowing its conference center to go up south of the historic downtown.
Not only does Wasatch Property's site have traffic challenges because there is no stoplight nearby on the busy U.S. 89-91 that is Logan's Main Street, it's a long hike to Logan's downtown restaurants, shops, performing-arts center and LDS Tabernacle, he said.
"Truly they are putting it in the wrong place. The city is attempting to fill a blighted location with the gem of our tourist effort."
Needham is hopeful downtown merchants can persuade Wasatch Properties' Dell Loy Hansen to shift gears and build his hotel on the corner of 200 North.
That site is too small for a conference center, but the center could be built about a block away on a vacant parcel owned by Cache County, across the street from the new state courthouse, Needham argues.
The Logan Downtown Alliance made its case in a press release issued Friday.
Wasatch Properties, in its own statement Friday, said its $60 million project already under way at 700 S. Main St. "will benefit the vitality of downtown and Logan City overall."
The Logan-based company, which owns office buildings in several states, already explored the option of building downtown, but there was not a site large enough, the company said in its statement.
Wasatch Properties needs a minimum of 15 acres for its office building - now under construction seven blocks to the south - a retail building, restaurant, parking for 600, hotel with 119 rooms and conference center with at least 20,000 square feet, the company said.
Further, the developer has no interest in separating the hotel from the conference center, as the downtown merchants suggest.
"Our studies confirm that it would be a fatal mistake," the company said.
One of the bones downtown merchants have to pick with Watts is that for the past year, he has told them he would listen to any proposals for the corner of 200 South and Main Street, which the city owns and which the previous administration wanted for government use. The tire store there closed last spring, though a title company remains in office space.
At a Dec. 14 meeting with the mayor, however, it quickly became clear to the investors - who own other Utah Marriott properties and who the merchants wooed to the city - that the new mayor is committed to the success of Wasatch Properties' hotel and conference center, not one downtown. The meeting ended abruptly.
The investors, who could not be reached for comment, are no longer pursuing the Logan site, Needham said.
Housley describes the concept he and the mayor were given that day as "too nebulous to take serious"- a suggestion the merchants reject.
For his part, Watts said he believes downtown is close enough that it will benefit from the conference center, which will be served by shuttle buses.
Needham acknowledges that merchants should have been louder in their opposition 14 months ago when the City Council, acting as the Redevelopment Agency board, approved tax-increment financing - essentially a $4.8 million property tax rebate - to Wasatch Properties.
His own brother and business partner, Joe Needham, was among the council members who approved the incentive.
"We probably could have and should have done more at the time," Gene Needham said Friday.
kmoulton@sltrib.com



I've only been to Logan a few times but the city has a nice main street feel with old buildings and green space with there temple and parks. They better keep all there old buildngs on main street.

Press Release from Logan Downtown Alliance








Posted: 10:34 AM- January 4, 2007




The Logan Downtown Alliance urges Logan City to offer incentives necessary for Wasatch Properties Hospitality Division to locate a hotel and conference center in historic downtown Logan. This would create a win-win situation for Wasatch Properties, Historic Downtown Logan, and Logan City. The Downtown Alliance invites Wasatch to the location that has been determined to be the "best location in Cache Valley for an upscale hotel" by an independent consulting firm. This location would be in the best interest of the community, the guests, and hotel investors. When Wasatch made plans to place a hospitality facility on 700 South Main, the prime corner at 200 North still housed a business and was not available, however now that has changed, creating the potential for them to use the ultimate piece of real estate in the valley for a hotel. Further, the city has an obligation to the businesses downtown to follow through on the Future Plan of Downtown Logan it voted to adopt in 2001 which called for a hotel and convention center as an anchor in downtown.
The Logan Downtown Alliance has worked with Marriott over the past several months to establish interest in the Logan market. The Marriott corporation has repeatedly stated that the 200 North corner is their location of choice. Visitors to Cache Valley have repeatedly asked for higher quality accommodations in historic downtown Logan.
Cache County prefers a neutral location for a conference center that would be supported by tax dollars generated from other hotels in the valley. The County has expressed concern that the hotel tax would be levied on all hotel rooms in the valley, but that at the 700 South Main location, the money would seem to unfairly favor the single hotel that is connected or associated with the conference center. They are much more comfortable with a centrally located conference center such as the southwest corner of the county block. This location is walk-able from more than five other hotel properties.
With a project of this magnitude, a long term parking solution could be created. This project would also trigger the newly formed RDA in the historic downtown area.
The city of Logan has hired many consultants and brought in many experts over the years. Without exception, they marvel at our downtown and mention it as a jewel that is unique in its vibrancy and culture. This is the result of strong, determined citizens and merchants that have kept downtown alive against all adds and community development trends. Revitalization is a continual process that will never be done, but is much less expensive now when done on an ongoing basis than to let downtown dwindle into the decay that downtown Ogden has struggled with for years, or requires the type of investment that downtown Salt Lake City is now undergoing. A Marriott in downtown will serve the citizens of the valley by providing the economic vitality that will preserve Logan as a unique and special place to live, and attract tourists by giving them the type of amenities that they expect while visiting the rich cultural attractions for which Logan is known.
Hence, the Logan Downtown Alliance strongly proposes that Wasatch Properties Hospitality Division be brought to locate in historic downtown Logan, specifically on the 200 North corner with the conference center on the adjacent county block.

Please feel free to call Gene Needham with any questions
435-751-7149 work
435-764-1896 cell

Last edited by delts145; Jan 19, 2007 at 5:42 PM.
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  #88  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 12:59 PM
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I wonder if Logan will get a mid to highrise hotel like what PG and Lehi are getting.
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1. "Wells Fargo Building" 24-stories 422 FT 1998
2. "LDS Church Office Building" 28-stories 420 FT 1973
3. "111 South Main" 24-stories 387 FT 2016
4. "99 West" 30-stories 375 FT 2011
5. "Key Bank Tower" 27-stories 351 FT 1976
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  #89  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 1:18 PM
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Ogden neighborhood becoming a destination.

In Los Angeles I have seen countless neighborhoods that had become ghetto make a tremendous turnaround due to the Latino influence.

Weber County
By Derek P. Jensen
The Salt Lake Tribune



OGDEN - Carmen Ponce Deleon's "carneceria" is a beacon glimmering through the chaos of street-worn winos, drug-ridden rentals, a hard-luck school and derelicts sleeping in forsaken cars.
Inside El Rodeo Meat Market, cinnamon scents and Latin guitar meld with piles of peppers, freshly sliced pig, pink and purple pi atas. A Corona beer sign glows against silver cauldrons for steaming tamales. Spanish-speaking grocers assist a steady stream of regulars, from children to grandparents.
"They feel like a family," says Ponce Deleon, a 42-year-old native of Chihuahua, Mexico, in seamless English.
In less than five years, Carmen and husband Jaime have taken the former boxing gym and punched promise into part of Utah's once second-most populated city, a place many say suffers from a midlife crisis.
Rich in railroad history, and later sustained by military-industrial jobs, Ogden now is scratching to find a defining industry. Some suggest skiing - Snowbasin hosted the 2002 Olympic downhill - while politicians plot a gondola over the rooftops to transform the working-class town into a high-end winter playground. Others clamor for consistent work. Any new jobs will do.
All the while, the county hub has itself been defined by a demographic shift that has literally changed its face. According to estimates, nearly 30 percent of Ogden is now Latino - more than three times the state average.
It is these immigrants, entrepreneurs like Carmen and Jaime, who are turning cast-off corners into places where neighbors gather.

Feels Like Home
During lunch rush, Ponce Deleon calmly helps her cadre of loyal employees and greets customers who are gathering everything from "menudo" and other meats to "tamarindo," stocked to mollify the middle school children across the street. Teachers, too, buy the spicy candy to reward good students.
Carmen and Jaime, along with their three kids, bolted Anaheim, Calif. and a carpet cleaning business in 2000 when the gangs and congestion became too much. They like the pace of Weber County - the family lives in nearby Harrisville - but took a gamble on the market. Within months it was profitable, leading the newcomers to open a second store and begin delivering groceries by van.
"Around here, there are a lot of people who don't have cars," Ponce Deleon says, adding the community reminds her of Chihuahua.
Still, it has unique problems, forcing the family to monitor the store by camera. A police sting last month notched dozens of drug arrests along the dilapidated blocks near the business.
It stands in cold contrast from the mansion-style homes emerging along the county's east-side timberline, near the ski areas, or the meandering rows of barns and horse trailers to the west.
Ponce Deleon doesn't seem to mind as she points to a plaque above the counter. It is an award issued by the city for helping to turn the neighborhood around.
"I never imagined retiring here," she says, smiling. "Now, I'm looking forward to it."

A Road Reborn
Less than a mile down the road, "Two-bit Street," or Historic 25th, is in the final stages of a renaissance. Whether a turn toward Park City, complete with yoga studio, is a good thing depends on who you ask.
Inside Rooster's, Kym Buttschardt's booming restaurant brewery, residents say a string of eateries, boutiques, museums and especially the loft-style living suggest the county's "crown jewel" is back.
"It's become a destination," Buttschardt says about the street notorious for gambling, brothels, biker bars and decades of drunkenness. "We call it the 'mountain to metro' effect."
Nearly two years at the helm of an unlikely sushi bar, Adam Nouansacksy agrees. "It's definitely getting cleaned up," he says, wrapping rolls at Shin Sei, Japanese for "newborn star."
Buttschardt and her husband now own three restaurants. Such entrepreneurship, she says, is key to recasting Ogden's otherwise foundering downtown.
On a bar stool a block down, Ko Ko Mo owner Eddie Simone weaves tales of wilder times on the street where he grew up. Instructed by nuns around the corner at St. Joseph Elementary by day, Simone spent afternoons selling newspapers on 25th and tormenting the madam at Rose's Room, a brothel. At 21, he bought the bar, which kept him from working "a ho-hum job at Hill Field."
"I used to leave the house and wonder who I was going to get into a fight with," he recalls.
Now 65, and also running a bail bonds business, Simone longs for the edgier times. He lights up while describing a discovery made during a Ko Ko Mo remodel: a sawed-off shotgun and dozens of soldiers' wallets, robbed then ditched during World War II.
"Maybe I like the old ways better," Simone mumbles with a grin. "It's milquetoast now."

To Your Health
Al Garcia has found his niche in Weber County.
After opening an herb and distilled water emporium, the New Mexico transplant discovered his preventative products are a natural fit.
"It's right in line with the lifestyle," he says, explaining ginseng, protein supplements and pure water are popular with Latinos who rely on sound health to perform physical jobs. " If you don't have [health] insurance, you have to do this."
As a woman refills her towering water bottle, the front doors in Garcia's Ogden store get a workout. Mostly Mexican immigrants peruse bottles of peppermint concentrate that helps clear congestion or pills that deter appetite while they wait for water bottles to fill.
"My eyes are peeled on 7-Eleven and Maverik stores that shut down," says Garcia, who suddenly has stores scattered across the Southwest.
The Ogden store - across the street from a Mexican bar and labor office - also has altered the life of Jeremy Dannehl, Garcia's son-in-law, who chats up his regular customers in Spanish honed during a Mormon mission.
Between sales, Dannehl grabs a handful of herbs from his pocket. The green capsules capture the attention of Guadalupe Sustaita, a regular at the store. "My kids haven't missed a day of school since they have been taking these," he tells her.
Dannehl once worked in a factory on Ogden's west side, fortifying cars bound for Mexico with bullet-proof armor. He now manages the health store and is committed to providing that country's immigrants an entirely different product.
djensen@sltrib.com

Welcome to Little Mountain, home to Westinghouse's Western Zirconium plant. For 25 years, more than 400 workers have commuted here from as far away as southern Idaho and Riverton. They come to make zirconium, an impenetrable substance used to safely house nuclear fuel rods.
"We don't glow in the dark," Erika Anderson jokes about the chemical-heavy operation - with armed guards - that runs around the clock.
Despite the remote location - the plant is perched along the Great Salt Lake's moonscape shore that doubles as an Air Force training ground - workers say the good pay and benefits keep them coming back.
Anderson says she appreciates seeing the deer and horses on her daily drive from Roy. Her only gripe: the lack of lunch options. "There is a 'roach coach' that comes out here. But you know how that goes."

Last edited by delts145; Jan 16, 2007 at 1:24 PM.
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  #90  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 1:34 PM
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I wonder if Logan will get a mid to highrise hotel like what PG and Lehi are getting.
I don't know SLC, Maybe Utaaah could give us a better idea of that. While Logan is definately coming along nicely it kind of seems like its on the fringe of the boom.
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  #91  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 3:31 PM
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I love Logan. If you haven't been there, or if it's been a while, consider making a day trip -- walk around downtown, the USU campus, or the trails of Logan Canyon, eat at the Bluebird Cafe, grab a snack at the campus creamery, sample the cheese curds at Gossners, and catch a show or concert at the historic Eccles Theater.

As far as the hotel is concerned, I hope it is built downtown, rather than on Wasatch's site south of downtown. If so, it may have to go taller to achieve the requisite number of rooms and perhaps incorporate structured parking. That could significantly increase the cost, however, so I doubt it will happen. I don't anticipate the building to rise half as many stories as the PG Embassy Suites, although that would be a nice, dominating addition to the Logan skyline.
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Old Posted Jan 19, 2007, 3:16 PM
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Davis Conference Center Expansion

Davis County is already expanding its 2-year-old conference center. This is good news for northern Utah residents because it will allow the center to host more consumer trade shows. When I lived there, I rarely attended shows, although many interested me, because I didn't want to make the hour-long trek to the Southtowne Expo Center in Sandy. I attended many more shows when they were held at the much more convenient (for northerners) Salt Palace.

A larger center in Davis planned



By Joseph M. Dougherty
Deseret Morning News
When Davis County's Barry Burton goes to Layton next month to meet with the city's planning commission, he will apply for site-plan approval for an expansion of the Davis Conference Center.
GSBS ArchitectsArtist's rendering shows plans for the expansion of the Davis Conference Center in Layton. Last year, the Davis County Board of Commissioners opted to issue $9.96 million in sales-tax revenue bonds to pay for the 40,000-square-foot addition, which will feature a 17,000-square-foot exhibit hall that could be expanded to 24,000 square feet.
As Davis County's assistant director of community and economic development, Burton will be the expansion's project manager. He previously oversaw the construction of the existing conference center; the Davis County Events Center, formerly known as the FairPark; and the Centerville branch of the Davis County Library.
During a board meeting Tuesday, commissioners officially authorized the two applications Burton will take to Layton. The county cannot start construction until Layton approves the project.
The Davis Conference Center has operated at nearly full capacity since it opened in 2004. The conference center expansion is expected to bring $15 million to $16 million to Davis County's economy by hosting larger conventions than the existing conference center can accommodate.
Construction on a 302-stall parking lot for the expansion will likely begin in March, Burton said.
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  #93  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2007, 5:46 PM
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Already expanding after only two years. That's a very good sign. No wonder Utah Counties southern metro is so anxious to get their own center in.
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Old Posted Jan 19, 2007, 10:55 PM
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That's great news. A 40,000-square-foot addition will bring more people and business up there to Layton.
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1. "Wells Fargo Building" 24-stories 422 FT 1998
2. "LDS Church Office Building" 28-stories 420 FT 1973
3. "111 South Main" 24-stories 387 FT 2016
4. "99 West" 30-stories 375 FT 2011
5. "Key Bank Tower" 27-stories 351 FT 1976
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Old Posted Jan 27, 2007, 1:23 PM
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Thumbs up Bright forecast for Davis County construction projects.

Real-estate facts for Davis County

The Davis County Commerce Consumer Research Group statistics/forecast for real estate in the county for the year 2006-7 were recently released.
Highlights include:
• Office lease rates were up and are predicted to rise again in 2007. Lean days for office space — this despite the fact that more than 200,000 square feet of new office space came onto the market in 2006.

• Office vacancy in 2006 dropped by 2 percent for an overall 2006 total of 11.39 percent (year end 2005 was 13.51 percent).

• The office space squeeze in Salt Lake County will continue to attract more businesses to Davis County.

• A record breaking 183,000 square feet of new retail space came into the Davis County market in 2006 inching the vacancy rate up to 8.42 percent compared to 2005 (8.31 percent vacancy).

• Lease rates hit an all-time-high of $15.97 a square foot, $1.85 per square foot above 2005.

• In 2007 vacancy rates are predicted to remain level or drop slightly, because there won't be as much new retail space available.

• For the industrial side, an increase in vacancy rates from 2005's 4.02 percent to the 2006 rate of 5.34 percent. In 2007 expect lease and sales rates to continue to climb because industrial land is hard to find.

• Freeport Center has only 65,000 square feet vacant of a total 7.2 million square feet of space. The Freeport West Industrial Park has better pickings, a total 389,000 square feet available.

• Apartment rents are at all time highs. The average rent in 2006 hit $670/month, up by $50/month over 2005.

• At the time of this report, only 203 rental units of a total 5,505 were vacant in Davis County. Apartment complex vacancy is now at an all-time low of 3.57 percent.
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  #96  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2007, 1:31 PM
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Cool Salomon Rec Center to open in May



Ogden rec center gets ski company's moniker
Workers piece together a climbing wall that will accommodate 17 climbers at one time at The Salomon Center in Ogden. The $18.5 million downtown facility is scheduled to open in May. (Paul Fraughton/The Salt Lake Tribune
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  #97  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2007, 5:35 AM
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It's going to be nice to see life in the old mall site once again. I'm especially excited for The Salomon Center/Megaplex theater combo. The architecture of the Megaplex theater will be very unique and cutting edge, with a large mesh tower, movie screens on the exterior of the building, as well as a circular screen that floats over the entry.
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  #98  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2007, 7:49 AM
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Here are some elevations of the Megaplex theater:



Last edited by gbb; Feb 3, 2007 at 8:22 AM.
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  #99  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2007, 8:22 AM
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gbb, I'm anxious to make a trip up to the area and check out all the new projects. It's been a while since I really took the time to just walk around Ogden's beautifully restored downtown. I'm really excited about this city's future and the many prestigious outdoor/sporting businesses that are making their home there.

......OOOOOOOHHHH, just looked at the rendering you just posted! Very Cool.

Last edited by delts145; Feb 3, 2007 at 9:43 AM.
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  #100  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2007, 8:27 AM
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It's exciting. Having grown up in the Ogden area, I have always known its potential and it's great to see things starting to fall into place. There is a lot going on downtown and I've been able to be involved in some of those projects. So that adds an additional level of anticipation.
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