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  #6261  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2018, 5:47 PM
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  #6262  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2018, 5:54 PM
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Apparently someone from Formula E (the international racing series for electric cars) has said they intend to return to Canada, specifically Toronto or Vancouver.
Unless they plan to be at some out-of-the-way location instead of downtown city streets, and more importantly pay for everything themselves, I'm guessing it won't be happening anytime in the near future, after the mess in Montreal last summer.
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  #6263  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2018, 6:48 PM
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Hmmm interesting. Wasn't aware there was a Formula E race in Montreal. I know they've used Circuit GV for Nascar and CART races, but I did not know about this, though this was on the streets.

As can be understood from my previous posts, I am not a fan of quiet race cars, but everyone is different. So my question is, if it were in TO, how many people would attend? I just read the MTL race sold 25k tickets and then had to give away 20k.

I'd say as percentage there are more race fans in QC then ON. Quite possibly even total numbers. So the prospects of a Formula E race in TO would seem grim to me. I think there would be less attendance.

In 2016 TO had a ridiculous number or sporting events and the sporting scene suffered from attrition and fatigue. Sports fans only had so much coin to spend. Raps in playoffs, Leafs young exciting team, Blue Jays going deep in playoffs. TFC going to final. Add in one time events, on top of regular events, like NBA All Star, World Cup of Hockey and Grey Cup and suddenly the market is saturated. For WCH and GC, they charged way too much for tickets thinking they could charge TO prices for any special occasion.

Well, there's already the Indy race in TO, and tonnes of other events, and the Raps and Leafs will be good for the foreseeable future (longer for Leafs than Raps) and TFC could be a perennial playoff team for a while even after Seba is gone.

I can't see this being well supported. And don't think gov't would shut down the streets again. And like you mentioned, it would be a tough sell for Indy at Mosport let alone silent race cars. And most footage I've seen of Formula E is street racing. I think the whole series is street based.

As for Vancouver. Maybe the whole green thing works out there as west coast tends to be more associated with that. But shutting down the streets of Vancouver for a few days? Ya could be a nightmare they want to avoid.
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  #6264  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2018, 8:20 PM
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We've done literally the only thing we ever do when a Newfoundlander does well internationally in sport - named a highway after them.



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Today, the Honourable Dwight Ball, Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, along with the Honourable Lisa Dempster, Minister of Children, Seniors and Social Development, Mark Browne, Parliamentary Secretary for Tourism, Culture, Industry and Innovation and MHA for Placentia West - Bellevue, and Betty Parsley, MHA Harbour Main, honoured Olympic gold and bronze medalist Kaetlyn Osmond, a native of Marystown, and Paralympic silver medalist Liam Hickey, St. John’s, on their accomplishments at the highest levels of international athletic competition.

In recognition of their accomplishments, the Provincial Government will be renaming the Burin Peninsula Highway from Red Harbour to Marystown Osmond Way and the Holyrood Access Road will become Liam Hickey Drive.
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  #6265  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2018, 8:26 PM
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Osmond moved away from Marystown (and Newfoundland) when she was 7 years old and she has a hockey arena, street, key to the town, and now a highway named after her.
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  #6266  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2018, 8:35 PM
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Moved away only to train in superior facilities, first in Quebec, then in Alberta. She's still her parents' daughter, and most of her family is here. That's more than enough to keep the culture. Naturally, though, she has said she considers herself a Newfoundlander and an Albertan.

She still counts.

(EDIT: She's doing a tour of the province now and CBC straight up asked her why she still uses Marystown, Newfoundland and Labrador, as her hometown when competing even though she's been away for so long. She said she's a Newfoundlander and it'll always be her answer to "Where is home?". Her mother added they moved away to better her skating career, and it's been great, but they're Newfoundlanders, all their family is still here, etc.)

And it's not that we can't accept children born and raised away aren't really Newfoundlanders. Look at the local coverage of the Humboldt deaths. They all describe Tobin as the child of Newfoundlanders, but never call him that as he wasn't born here, etc.

Quote:
Parker Tobin, 18, was one of 15 who lost their lives in Friday's Humboldt Broncos bus crash. Both of Tobin's parents currently live in Alberta but are originally from Newfoundland — his father is from Bay Roberts and his mother from the Heart's Content area.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfou...obin-1.4614113

And even then I imagine I'd still get along decently with him. He wouldn't have a local accent, but he'd understand it, even slang. He'd get some local references, he'd have personal experience visiting, etc.
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  #6267  
Old Posted Apr 14, 2018, 12:09 AM
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I think that's pretty cool! I wish they'd name a township after me...Mistercorporateville has a nice ring to it
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  #6268  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2018, 5:13 PM
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Toronto Wolfpack are on their way to the Super League, so get used to it

A Canadian club reaching the top flight would not please everyone but they could bring something exciting to the party

With half of the regular season done, it’s already looking like Huddersfield will have to see off Toronto, Featherstone and Toulouse in the Qualifiers to retain their Super League place. Catalans, Hull KR and Widnes will do well not to join them.

None of the Super League strugglers would relish a win-or-bust clash with Toronto, who have just one early season defeat and draw against their name. The Wolfpack blew away supposed top-four contenders Halifax 42-10 over the weekend in north London. Having played everyone away, Toronto are in a bizarre run of “home” matches taking place in Barrow, Wood Green, Markham (Ontario), Warrington and Newcastle before eight matches on their new pitch at the Lamport Stadium. It would be a shock if they are not miles clear at the top come late summer.

The four full-time clubs stuffed their part-time opponents last weekend, while part-time Featherstone – whose budget is apparently as large as London’s full-time one – have crept up to second place. “There’s two mini leagues and the disparity between them is huge – and getting bigger each year,” says Rochdale Hornets back Richard Lepori. “But it’s strange at the moment. There are different styles between the full-time and part-time clubs.

“Toronto are looking to win the league, but only beat us by a point and almost lost twice at Barrow, although that is one of the tougher part-time places to go. Featherstone were better against us than London were, but I’d expect Toronto and London to do better against the Super League sides. Leigh are coming on strong now and I think they will make the top four. Toulouse put on a show at home but don’t seem the same team away. I don’t think they’ll get promoted.”

If Toulouse finish in the top two they will get four home Qualifiers, which could help them to the Million Pound Game, potentially against Catalans: a lose-lose scenario for rugby à treize. If the final table reflected the spending power, Toronto will finish top, followed by Leigh, with Featherstone and London fighting Toulouse for the other two play-off places. At the bottom, Lepori’s Rochdale and Swinton already look doomed. It is no surprise, given their central funding is approximately a tenth of what Leigh received this season.

“The reality is some opponents may be on five, six or even 10 times more than me,” says Lepori. “But I want to play against these teams, not in League 1. People want promotion and relegation [in Super League] and the only way is to have full-time teams in the Championship. But we’re getting to the place where the Championship can’t sustain many more.”

Like most semi-pros, Italy winger Lepori leads a double life. Last week, hours after playing in Rochdale’s humiliating cup defeat at Whitehaven, he was invigilating a Maths exam in Islington. “Each squad has experienced Championship players, some internationals, even some who have played Super League. But the full-time teams will be fitter, a little stronger and last a bit longer. They also have one or two big names who make a difference. For example, London might be losing and Jarrod Sammut does something magic. The half-backs are the key, defining factor, the money men. You get Toronto signing a halfback with 200 NRL games to his name [Josh McCrone]!”

Toronto unleashed former Manly prop Darcy Lussick on the Championship on Saturday, his huge and athletic frame adding youth to a veteran pack. With Joe Westerman returning to Hull and Rene Maitua revealing on Saturday that he has retired again, there is room for further up-grading of the Wolfpack ahead of the qualifiers. Frightening for the rest, they have yet to sign a salary cap-exempt marquee player.

“I don’t think Toronto are signing players for their run of home games in the summer,” says Lepori, who played in the World Cup alongside NRL superstars James Tedesco and Paul Vaughan. “They’re signing players for when they go away to Salford or Widnes [in the Qualifiers] and have to churn out a result.” The likelihood of Toronto being in Super League next year may not please everyone but get used to it: we should all be excited by what they may bring to the party.

The Wolfpack’s attempt to recreate the Lamport spirit at New River was rather undermined by the abysmal weather, and the Broncos and London Men’s League all in action across the city on the same afternoon, which ruled out at least a thousand potential spectators. There were teething problems, but an hour after the game the atmosphere in the hospitality tent could not have been warmer. One family had flown over from Toronto just for the weekend, and owner David Argyle – a pint-clutching figure wrapped up in club scarf and hat – said he was confident Wolfpack fans would travel the world to see their team if they take early season games to far-flung warmer climes. The club have ambitions to be back in London in August for the Challenge Cup final. Warrington will have something to say about that.

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/no...pionship-rugby
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  #6269  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2018, 6:16 PM
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Originally Posted by JHikka View Post
Osmond moved away from Marystown (and Newfoundland) when she was 7 years old and she has a hockey arena, street, key to the town, and now a highway named after her.
You're forgetting the first rule of island culture (and since I'm from PEI, I'm firmly aware of this)

Rule #1 - once an Islander, always an Islander.
Rule #2 - a mainlander is always a CFA, no matter how long he, his children or his children's children live on the island.
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  #6270  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2018, 7:49 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
You're forgetting the first rule of island culture (and since I'm from PEI, I'm firmly aware of this)

Rule #1 - once an Islander, always an Islander.
Rule #2 - a mainlander is always a CFA, no matter how long he, his children or his children's children live on the island.
Haha that's how I feel about people from out of province moving to BC.
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  #6271  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2018, 8:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
You're forgetting the first rule of island culture (and since I'm from PEI, I'm firmly aware of this)

Rule #1 - once an Islander, always an Islander.
Rule #2 - a mainlander is always a CFA, no matter how long he, his children or his children's children live on the island.
When I lived in C'town, I was granted Island citizenship because my mother and grandparents were from up west O'Leary way. Never got the CFA treatment when people knew the family history.

BTW, getting back on point, after Osmond's slight wobble near the beginning of the program I have never seen a more laser focused perfect skate. I'm going to watch it again to make sure I remember it like that.
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  #6272  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2018, 8:45 PM
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Originally Posted by elly63 View Post
When I lived in C'town, I was granted Island citizenship because my mother and grandparents were from up west O'Leary way. Never got the CFA treatment when people knew the family history.
I get the same thing in Newfoundland. Removed a couple generations but the family name is there and that can be enough for most newfs.
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  #6273  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2018, 9:43 PM
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Last edited by elly63; May 1, 2018 at 1:52 AM.
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  #6274  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 5:16 PM
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Originally Posted by JHikka View Post
Toronto Wolfpack are on their way to the Super League, so get used to it

A Canadian club reaching the top flight would not please everyone but they could bring something exciting to the party

With half of the regular season done, it’s already looking like Huddersfield will have to see off Toronto, Featherstone and Toulouse in the Qualifiers to retain their Super League place. Catalans, Hull KR and Widnes will do well not to join them.

None of the Super League strugglers would relish a win-or-bust clash with Toronto, who have just one early season defeat and draw against their name. The Wolfpack blew away supposed top-four contenders Halifax 42-10 over the weekend in north London. Having played everyone away, Toronto are in a bizarre run of “home” matches taking place in Barrow, Wood Green, Markham (Ontario), Warrington and Newcastle before eight matches on their new pitch at the Lamport Stadium. It would be a shock if they are not miles clear at the top come late summer.

The four full-time clubs stuffed their part-time opponents last weekend, while part-time Featherstone – whose budget is apparently as large as London’s full-time one – have crept up to second place. “There’s two mini leagues and the disparity between them is huge – and getting bigger each year,” says Rochdale Hornets back Richard Lepori. “But it’s strange at the moment. There are different styles between the full-time and part-time clubs.

“Toronto are looking to win the league, but only beat us by a point and almost lost twice at Barrow, although that is one of the tougher part-time places to go. Featherstone were better against us than London were, but I’d expect Toronto and London to do better against the Super League sides. Leigh are coming on strong now and I think they will make the top four. Toulouse put on a show at home but don’t seem the same team away. I don’t think they’ll get promoted.”

If Toulouse finish in the top two they will get four home Qualifiers, which could help them to the Million Pound Game, potentially against Catalans: a lose-lose scenario for rugby à treize. If the final table reflected the spending power, Toronto will finish top, followed by Leigh, with Featherstone and London fighting Toulouse for the other two play-off places. At the bottom, Lepori’s Rochdale and Swinton already look doomed. It is no surprise, given their central funding is approximately a tenth of what Leigh received this season.

“The reality is some opponents may be on five, six or even 10 times more than me,” says Lepori. “But I want to play against these teams, not in League 1. People want promotion and relegation [in Super League] and the only way is to have full-time teams in the Championship. But we’re getting to the place where the Championship can’t sustain many more.”

Like most semi-pros, Italy winger Lepori leads a double life. Last week, hours after playing in Rochdale’s humiliating cup defeat at Whitehaven, he was invigilating a Maths exam in Islington. “Each squad has experienced Championship players, some internationals, even some who have played Super League. But the full-time teams will be fitter, a little stronger and last a bit longer. They also have one or two big names who make a difference. For example, London might be losing and Jarrod Sammut does something magic. The half-backs are the key, defining factor, the money men. You get Toronto signing a halfback with 200 NRL games to his name [Josh McCrone]!”

Toronto unleashed former Manly prop Darcy Lussick on the Championship on Saturday, his huge and athletic frame adding youth to a veteran pack. With Joe Westerman returning to Hull and Rene Maitua revealing on Saturday that he has retired again, there is room for further up-grading of the Wolfpack ahead of the qualifiers. Frightening for the rest, they have yet to sign a salary cap-exempt marquee player.

“I don’t think Toronto are signing players for their run of home games in the summer,” says Lepori, who played in the World Cup alongside NRL superstars James Tedesco and Paul Vaughan. “They’re signing players for when they go away to Salford or Widnes [in the Qualifiers] and have to churn out a result.” The likelihood of Toronto being in Super League next year may not please everyone but get used to it: we should all be excited by what they may bring to the party.

The Wolfpack’s attempt to recreate the Lamport spirit at New River was rather undermined by the abysmal weather, and the Broncos and London Men’s League all in action across the city on the same afternoon, which ruled out at least a thousand potential spectators. There were teething problems, but an hour after the game the atmosphere in the hospitality tent could not have been warmer. One family had flown over from Toronto just for the weekend, and owner David Argyle – a pint-clutching figure wrapped up in club scarf and hat – said he was confident Wolfpack fans would travel the world to see their team if they take early season games to far-flung warmer climes. The club have ambitions to be back in London in August for the Challenge Cup final. Warrington will have something to say about that.

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/no...pionship-rugby
This is a very compelling story. Having no previous rugby background the Wolfpack have made me a bit of an addict. It reeks of Toronto's future this team. The local sporting landscape is changing so fast and this team right here could prove to be so much more.

As I understand it, the Challenge Cup final (the FA Cup of English rugby league) is played at Wembley Stadium in front of 80,000 people? And a large tv audience especially in the South Pacific?

Fascinating.
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  #6275  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 7:11 PM
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It reeks of Toronto's future this team. The local sporting landscape is changing so fast and this team right here could prove to be so much more.

.
Don't you think you're going just a tad overboard?
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  #6276  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 7:47 PM
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There seems to be an appetite for sports in the city beyond the traditional. There seems to be a desire to see a diversity of sports here rather than the few and the stereotypical. So that was my intent. Maple Leafs, Blue Jays, Argos are not being tossed to the wayside. Instead, the Raptors rise especially among youth. Toronto FC and it's establishment as a legit culture. Whatever comes of the Canadian Premier League (York Region rumored to be building a 15,000 seat soccer specific stadium).
Welcoming things like Toronto Wolfpack and their global aspirations, Major League Rugby in 2019 (Ontario Arrows), the planned Global T20 Cricket league endorsed by the ICC. It all just feels a lot like the people itself: progressive, diverse, etc.

That was my intent.
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  #6277  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 7:50 PM
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There seems to be an appetite for sports in the city beyond the traditional. There seems to be a desire to see a diversity of sports here rather than the few and the stereotypical. So that was my intent. Maple Leafs, Blue Jays, Argos are not being tossed to the wayside. Instead, the Raptors rise especially among youth. Toronto FC and it's establishment as a legit culture. Whatever comes of the Canadian Premier League (York Region rumored to be building a 15,000 seat soccer specific stadium).
Welcoming things like Toronto Wolfpack and their global aspirations, Major League Rugby in 2019 (Ontario Arrows), the planned Global T20 Cricket league endorsed by the ICC. It all just feels a lot like the people itself: progressive, diverse, etc.

That was my intent.
The Canadian Premier League is unlikely to be that much of a hit in the GTA as it's all-Canadian. Even if they're playing a sport that is emergent and has a global shine to it.

But sure, there is a "xenophilic" aspect to Toronto sports tastes at the moment.
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  #6278  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 8:06 PM
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How can it be "xenophilic"? Is the population itself not heavily foreign in nature? Are we not allowed the freedom of choice? I think it's less what you imply (we hate Canadiana for the sake of it) and more a result of an age where technology and globalization has given us more choice.

And now we can choose.

I personally prefer we as Canadians interact and go out into the larger world to tell our stories. The Toronto Wolfpack playing at Wembley in front of that audience is kind of neat. As is the idea of Toronto FC in the Club World Cup or Canada at the World Cup. Having global cricket players come to Canada to play with Canadians and thus, improve our skills at one of the world's most watched games.

Or we could just stick to what the world already knows we do but mostly doesn't care about? Then we are having conversations with ourselves as we have been doing for the past 50 years. We can grow without sacrificing. We can have both.
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  #6279  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 8:17 PM
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I don't really care any more. Just pointing out the inconsistencies.

All of the stuff that you and so many others are salivating over as "new" and global" has actually existed for centuries - and so is old - and is totally traditional and localized in some other part of the world. (I don't think we have seen a major new team sport emerge on the global stage in multiple generations.)

Anyway, tell a British person you're all excited about these "novel" games like cricket, rugby and association football, and they'll laugh you out of the room.

And of course none of these sports would have radiated outwards from their home bases if the people who created had thought they sucked and derided them.

The first step to having other people find you and what you do worthy of interest, is for you to find you yourself worthy of interest.

Finally, a true indicator of the immaturity of this mindset is the post where you said something like "OMG! The rugby final in London draws 80,000 people! Can you believe it????"

Of course I can believe it. Why wouldn't I believe it? I knew that already. And if I didn't I would have probably expected it.
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  #6280  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 10:40 PM
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It almost seems like you are a sports communist. I don't quite understand what is wrong with liking sports that are not inherently "Canadian?" Or, to aspire to greatness at these sports as Canadians?

I find the Wolfpack story compelling. Would you ignore it simply because it isn't natural? Perhaps keep things same old same old for their own sake? I am baffled. I have always found the beauty in sports (as exemplified by the Olympic Games) is in their diversity. The idea of living in a place where I can go see a basketball game, baseball game, association football game, ice hockey, rugby league, rugby union, twenty20 cricket, box lacrosse, arena soccer, women's hockey, or Canadian football game simply amuses me. Makes me feel richer.

Do you like Indian food? Jamaican? Mexican or Thai? Or no. Because they are foreign? If an Indian diner opens in Meaford, Ontario it will be "new" regardless of the fact it has fed South Asia for centuries...and...it will make Meaford a little more interesting, don't you think?

Wolfpack makes things a little more interesting.
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