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  #221  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 4:13 AM
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  #222  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 4:21 PM
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  #223  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 4:22 PM
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Median Household Income in USA and Canada

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  #224  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 7:17 PM
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According to 2016 census data, almost 33% of households are made up of one person in Quebec, the highest rate in the country. In Canada, we are talking about 28.2% of households. It's the highest proportion since 1867.
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  #225  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 7:59 PM
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I don't know what's the last map posted trying to say, really. I'd still prefer to live in Québec or New Brunswick rather than the Northwest Territories...
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  #226  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 8:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Laceoflight View Post
I don't know what's the last map posted trying to say, really. I'd still prefer to live in Québec or New Brunswick rather than the Northwest Territories...
Agreed. Also Median Household Income doesn't translate well into disposable income. You can buy a decent house in NB for $150,000, not over $1M like in Vancouver. We're not living in penury in NB like this statistic would suggest......
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  #227  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 8:26 PM
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the median total income is almost the same in Toronto, Montréal or Vancouver.
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tabl...il107a-eng.htm
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  #228  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 9:17 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Agreed. Also Median Household Income doesn't translate well into disposable income. You can buy a decent house in NB for $150,000, not over $1M like in Vancouver. We're not living in penury in NB like this statistic would suggest......
The cost of living is high up in the territories as well. Food costs in Nunavut for example are around 3x the average in Canada.

I've posted this many times but middle class or lower younger people (now under 40 or so) in Vancouver and now Toronto who don't get help from wealthier relatives generally have a poor material standard of living. I know a lot of people in their 30's who have steady jobs and postsecondary education but are living in basements and can't really afford a car.

Even the well off younger people generally only have what would normally have been considered a comfortable middle class or slightly below standard of living 20 years ago. These are the people who make well into the six figures but live in 2 BR condos or rent, maybe own a car, and still aren't having kids if they want them because they can't find suitable housing.

Housing costs are responsible for almost all of this. High housing costs also force people to to live is less convenient areas and commute farther, robbing them of free time.

Younger people are also squeezed by poorer quality jobs and less stability in employment. They work stranger hours, they have to switch jobs a lot, they don't get great benefits (e.g. number of holidays resets down to a base 2-3 weeks because they have to switch jobs every couple years), etc.
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  #229  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 9:23 PM
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Don't know if these have been posted before, but here is the built-area of Canada's 25-largest CMAs from 4 time periods: 1971, 1991, 2001 and 2011.

LINK

I'm not going to post all of them, but here are a few that jumped out at me:

1. Cities like Saint John and Thunder Bay that experienced "sprawl without growth". There was an 'explosion' of low density exurban development in the 1990s, but that tapered off considerably in the 2000s.





2. Montreal - era of outward development doesn't coincide with other Canadian cities. The 1990s saw anemic growth, but there was quite a bit of outward suburban development in the 2000s. Maybe the 2010s will see less suburban development but much more infill (which won't be shown).



3. Calgary: surprisingly compact, given that the CMA effectively doubled in population between 1991 and 2011:

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  #230  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 9:29 PM
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  #231  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 9:39 PM
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Montréal is the king of sprawl in Canada since 2001. not even Toronto can compete lol

https://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/16-201...tbl2-2-eng.htm

updated link

2001-2011

Montréal +161 km²
Toronto +102 km²
Quebec City +67 km²
Calgary +66 km²
Edmonton +57 km²
Ottawa-Gatineau +44 km²
Halifax +39 km²
Vancouver +35 km²
Winnipeg +24 km²
Hamilton +23 km²

and people ask why Vancouver is so expensive.
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Last edited by GreaterMontréal; Apr 15, 2018 at 10:12 PM.
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  #232  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 10:45 PM
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A large amount of what they included as newly developed in Thunder Bay is grasslands around the airport, a swamp on an island that is unchanged since the 1970s and shouldn't have been included, and in some cases, areas that were developed before the 1970s but not recorded in the older data and simply added at a later date.

I can't speak for the other maps but the Thunder Bay one is hilariously inaccurate, and makes the urban sprawl problem look even worse than it already is.
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  #233  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 11:11 PM
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With Saint-Jean and Saint-Lin, Montréal is now about 2,000 km² .
Saint-Jean is 226 km², Saint-Lin is 118 km².

Montréal was 1,571 km² in 2011.

Montréal is about twice the size of Edmonton and Vancouver.
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/16-201-...tbl2-2-eng.htm
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  #234  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2018, 2:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post
A large amount of what they included as newly developed in Thunder Bay is grasslands around the airport, a swamp on an island that is unchanged since the 1970s and shouldn't have been included, and in some cases, areas that were developed before the 1970s but not recorded in the older data and simply added at a later date.

I can't speak for the other maps but the Thunder Bay one is hilariously inaccurate, and makes the urban sprawl problem look even worse than it already is.
I'm seeing similar idiosyncrasies in the Saint John data - most notably the entirety of Rockwood Park (mostly wilderness) showing as built up in the 1990s. I applaud the mapping effort but there are definitely some issues with the land cover classification they used.
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  #235  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2018, 2:35 AM
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Another one that appears as developed on Thunder Bay's map is a 100 year old golf course. What changed in the 1990s to start including it?
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  #236  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2018, 2:27 PM
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Cool map, from 2003 but I've never seen it before - building construction dates across Toronto. There'd probably be a lot more green downtown today...


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  #237  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2018, 2:31 PM
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Interesting how the area to the west of today's CBD developed quite a bit earlier than the area about the same distance away but that was east of the Don River.
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  #238  
Old Posted May 3, 2018, 11:25 PM
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  #239  
Old Posted May 3, 2018, 11:32 PM
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On who's behalf was the question asked? A Brit?
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  #240  
Old Posted May 4, 2018, 12:24 AM
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British Columbia is so British haha! #1 in Canadian support.
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