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  #141  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2018, 9:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
Was "fresh off the boat" to describe recent immigrants, ever an expression used at the time that most immigrants came by boat, not plane?

Most usages of "fresh off the boat" I've seen in popular culture make it seem like it's describing a generation of people too young to have been the ones who arrived by boat.
I don't know when it originated, but I suspect it goes back to the 19th century, if not earlier.
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  #142  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2018, 10:56 PM
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Originally Posted by CanadianCentaur View Post
My parents first immigrated to Canada in 1968 by ship, and did so via Pier 21. And you're right it wasn't as well known as a landing point for transatlantic immigration into Canada. Didn't most go through Montreal or something? After all it was Canada's largest city until the mid-70s.
Montreal is a significantly longer transatlantic crossing by ship than Halifax. Montreal is also not ice-free whereas Halifax is. Year-round shipping in Montreal began in the 1960's.
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  #143  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2018, 12:52 AM
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East Windsor (formerly Ford City), a company town that was soon merged into Windsor, had a lot of Slavic immigrants.

East Windsor, 1931:

British Isles 4,980 34.9%
French 3,989 28%
Ukrainian 800 5.6%
Romanian 730 5.1%
Polish 688 4.8%
Czech and Slovak 435 3.1%
Yugoslav 401 2.8%
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  #144  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2018, 12:55 AM
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Some BC mining towns with sizable Italian communities, 1931.

Trail 1,280 16.9%
Fernie 511 18.7%
Revelstoke 363 13.3%
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  #145  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2018, 8:35 PM
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A few more before I start bringing in some 19th century census data

Employment in agriculture, 1931

Saskatchewan 60%
Alberta 51%
Manitoba 35%
New Brunswick 33%
Nova Scotia 24%
Ontario 23%
Quebec 22%
BC 14%

(Forgot to get PEI!)
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  #146  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2018, 4:26 AM
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Here's the UScities with the largest continental European-born population in 1930, for comparison:

New York 1,846,348 26.6%
Chicago 705,825 20.9%
Philadelphia 270,236 13.9%
Detroit 231,090 14.7%
Cleveland 194,363 21.6%
Boston 108,623 13.9%
Los Angeles 102,396 8.3%
Milwaukee 102,126 17.7%
San Francisco 101,071 15.9%
Newark 97,354 22%
Pittsburgh 84,398 12.6%
Buffalo 81,330 14.2%
St. Louis 68,828 8.4%
Minneapolis 68,412 14.7%
Baltimore 64,720 8%
Jersey City 52,703 16.6%
Rochester 52,585 16%
Seattle 41,293 11.3%
St. Paul 35,813 13.2%
Providence 34,778 13.7%
Paterson 33,873 24.5%
Portland 31,300 10.4%
Bridgeport 31,089 21.2%
Oakland 30,244 10.6%
New Haven 30,135 18.5%

So Toronto and Montreal had a similar percentage as Baltimore and St. Louis, second tier European immigrant centers. Winnipeg had an especially high percentage.

Though if "Toronto the Good" was compared to British and Australian cities, it would be the most diverse by far.
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