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  #2561  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 3:36 PM
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The more I think about it. Wouldn't it be cool if there was a mini beach along the riverfront in Wilmington, kind of like in Chicago with Lake Michigan? But then again, ships use the Christina River so it probably wouldn't work out unless the ships use a different river.
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  #2562  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 3:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kidphilly View Post
you completely exclude the 3-4M people within 45 minutes or so of TTN that could leverage as an alternative to EWR

TTN has 8M people within an hour of the airport and would be both an alternative to PHL and EWR
You actually just said what I was trying to say; TTN is an alternative but I didn't really include the counties north or Mercer because they don't have much cultural ties to the region; but we said the same thing.
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  #2563  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 4:03 PM
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What I could like to see in Delaware is more regional rail service between Philly and Delaware.

If I'm not mistaken the Wilmington/Newark line is the only mass transit like between Philly and Delaware and if you aren't near that rail line then you have to take I-95. I-95 in Chester is horrible partly because of Route 322 traffic merges with I-95 and its one of the worst things I've ever seen. If you're driving on Route 322 you have to merge from one highway into the fast lane of I-95 and then cross the highway if you're heading to the Commodore Barry Bridge; that slows I-95 up there a whole lot. There really should be a wider I-95 in that area and an Route 320 overpass there but it won't be easy.

If we had better rail service into Delaware it could open up that entire area and reduce traffic.

Why not extend the Wilmington/Newark line to Elkton, Maryland? Why not run commuter service to Seaford, Delaware or Smyrna, even Lewes?
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  #2564  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 8:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanthusiat View Post
Eagleview continues to attract life science companies





From: https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...e-science.html
Well that explains what that construction site is. My wife and I figured it was another hotel. Nice to see this area continue to flourish.
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  #2565  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 9:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Urbanthusiat View Post
Eagleview continues to attract life science companies


From: https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...e-science.html
This is really good to see. Almost like the 128 corridor outside of Boston.


RE: Septa expansion. I think our only hope is Phoenixville and West Chester. Marc is probably more likely to make it up to Newark.

Anyone catch that they anticipate the Broad St. line extension to be at least 50+% costly because they did not expect the Navy Yard would flourish like it has and they can no longer build it in the originally planned cheaper method.
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  #2566  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2018, 2:37 AM
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Hot market: Downingtown, Exton adding residential units

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The Downingtown and Exton areas are experiencing a notable surge in development activity — and apartment complexes are the most popular projects as nearly 2,000 units are expected to come on the market over the next couple of years.

...

The biggest is River Station, which is the redevelopment of the former Sonoco paper mill at Boot Road and Route 322. The more than $100 million project involves constructing six buildings that will have 442 apartments and 14,200 square feet of retail space. Its new urbanism design aims to create a dense, walkable mixed-use community.

The property totals 70 acres and sits in both East Caln and Downingtown. One of its draws is the site will eventually have a relocated Downingtown train station that serves SEPTA and Amtrak. Part of the River Station project will include building a new pedestrian bridge to link a nearby park to the Brandywine Creek and the Chester-Valley Trail.

“It’s quite an opportunity for Downingtown and will really change the whole face of it,” said Neal Fisher, vice president of development at Hankin.

The relocation of the train station is in the early stages and the timing isn’t certain. Regardless, Hankin plans to start on River Station and build it in phases.

“We’re not waiting for the train station to move forward with development, but we would like to have it coordinated,” said Robert Hankin, CEO at the development company. The developer has received a conditional use permit and is awaiting final land development approval.

Keva Flats is another multifamily Hankin development. The project is off Route 30 on a parcel behind a Kohl’s store. Hankin has owned the land for 30 years but has left it undeveloped until now. The $60 million project will have 240 apartments in five buildings. Amenities will include a rooftop lounge area and club room as well as a redeveloped Frank Furness designed house that will have two rental units.

Not far down the road at Routes 401 and 100 in Chester Springs, Hankin is planning Weatherstone that will involve 230 apartments along with 120,000 square feet of either retail or office space and a day care center on 24 acres. A portion of the apartments will be developed over retail space. Construction is scheduled to begin this summer and the project will be rolled out in two phases.

In addition to those projects, Hankin is completing Spring Hill Suites, a 124-room hotel that is across from the entrance to Eagleview and will open in October. In the meantime, Hankin is in the early stages of figuring out what to do with 240 acres it has off Lionville Station Road.

...

E. Kahn Development Co., another active player in the Downingtown-Exton area, is embarking on several new projects. On 50 acres the company bought from the Philadelphia Archdiocese, the developer plans 230 apartments fronting Route 30. On the same parcel, Southdown Homes, the residential development arm of J. Loew & Associates, has approvals for 225 single-family houses and townhouses. Both projects are expected to start this year, said Eli Kahn, founder of E. Kahn Development.

Off Boot Road, Kahn expects to begin construction of 110 townhouses later this year. Hanover Cos. and Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust are developing 350 apartments next to the Exton Square Mall and Wolfsohn Group is looking to build 410 units at Main Street at Exton.

...
https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...sidential.html
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  #2567  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2018, 3:28 PM
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Technically not the MSA but...

Tower Health, Drexel University to build medical school in Berks County

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West Reading, PA — Tower Health and Drexel University have announced plans to develop a medical school campus Berks County, officials with the two organizations announced Monday.

Tower Health is evaluating sites for the location of the Drexel University College of Medicine branch campus. The health system is looking for a site near Reading Hospital, but a final site has not been identified.

"To me this is a game-changer for our community," said Clint Matthews, president and CEO of Tower Health. "It's transformational for Reading Hospital and the Tower Health System, and it's a game-changer for our community with several hundred medical students receiving training on our campus. They become the fabric of our organization as we populate the medical staffs of tomorrow within our community."

The move begins the process for Tower Health to build an academic medical center. It will bring undergraduate and graduate clinical education and research to a single campus.

Students receiving training at the branch campus would come to the medical school for all four years of training.

"We've had academia and teaching as part of our mission," Matthews said. "This is greatly expanding upon that."

The new medical school campus will be subject to the appropriate accreditation approvals. It is expected that upon approval of the regional accreditor, the branch campus will be operational for the 2020-21 school year. The new branch campus will bring about 200 medical school students to the area in the initial years with the opportunity to grow from there, Matthews said.

"We are so pleased to share with Tower Health in this effort to expand opportunities for medical training in our region, which will benefit practitioners and patients alike," Drexel President John Fry said in a statement.
http://www.readingeagle.com/news/art...n-berks-county

...

Should be a great thing for Reading, a community which definitely needs more jobs and something to attract young people. This would be the only medical school in the area.
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  #2568  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2018, 4:26 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnIII View Post
What I could like to see in Delaware is more regional rail service between Philly and Delaware.

If I'm not mistaken the Wilmington/Newark line is the only mass transit like between Philly and Delaware and if you aren't near that rail line then you have to take I-95. I-95 in Chester is horrible partly because of Route 322 traffic merges with I-95 and its one of the worst things I've ever seen. If you're driving on Route 322 you have to merge from one highway into the fast lane of I-95 and then cross the highway if you're heading to the Commodore Barry Bridge; that slows I-95 up there a whole lot. There really should be a wider I-95 in that area and an Route 320 overpass there but it won't be easy.

If we had better rail service into Delaware it could open up that entire area and reduce traffic.

Why not extend the Wilmington/Newark line to Elkton, Maryland? Why not run commuter service to Seaford, Delaware or Smyrna, even Lewes?
Some of the issues lie in the legacy rail alignments in the area, which aren't always helpful as far as heading towards Philly. There were several legacy routes heading N/S paralleling the Brandywine Creek IIRC but that's perpendicular to the direction you want if you want to go to Philly.

I agree, though, that some more RR service is a good thing. You could extend it along the NEC into Cecil Co., and towards New Castle and Middletown, although I think if you extend it further south than that you're looking at something more like a corridor service than an RR one. There are actually a few good opportunities for rail on the Delmarva Peninsula but quite a few challenges, too.
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  #2569  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2018, 1:50 PM
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Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
Some of the issues lie in the legacy rail alignments in the area, which aren't always helpful as far as heading towards Philly. There were several legacy routes heading N/S paralleling the Brandywine Creek IIRC but that's perpendicular to the direction you want if you want to go to Philly.

I agree, though, that some more RR service is a good thing. You could extend it along the NEC into Cecil Co., and towards New Castle and Middletown, although I think if you extend it further south than that you're looking at something more like a corridor service than an RR one. There are actually a few good opportunities for rail on the Delmarva Peninsula but quite a few challenges, too.

I remember when I was a kid there was the Diamond line; it went south of Wilmington but its no longer used. One time we ended up farther then where we wanted to be and had to turn back so we could get back to Churchman's Crossing.

I was thinking it they modernized the Diamond Line they could probably extend commuter or regional rail service right down the Delmarva Peninsula; I should drive down there; the tracks may be still there. If I remember right it ran south of the Northeast Corridor; all we have to do is modernize the rail bed I'm thinking.

All I can tell you is that the metro line was called the Blue Diamond Line; it ran from Wilmington south to Seaford, Delaware; but I can't remember what it cost to ride it back then or if it stopped in Seaford, Delaware or kept going south. If the tracks or rail bed is still there it may be an option.

I also heard that before my time there was a coastal passage line that when to places like Delaware City or something like that but I don't remember about that; some of my cousins are in their 80's and 90's and they talked about that.

Last edited by JohnIII; Apr 10, 2018 at 3:36 PM.
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  #2570  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2018, 11:58 PM
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An interesting article published by delawareonline.com:

What else does Wilmington need to be more fun? We have (more) suggestions.

Quote:
About three years ago, we decided to brainstorm about what Wilmington needs to be more fun.

We offered eight suggestions, five of which have largely become a reality as the city's revitalization efforts push on. Let's take a look at the progress:

-- Production brewery: Wilmington Brew Works is expected to open in late May/early June on Miller Road, delivering the city its first production brewery in 64 years. As a bonus, microbrewery/brewpub Stitch House Brewery opened on N. Market Street across from The Grand last month -- only the second downtown Wilmington brewery in more than six decades.

-- Record store: The independent SqueezeBox Records opened off Pennsylvania Avenue in October.

-- Late night eats: Still no late night diner, but food trucks (especially The Plum Pit Food Truck) are a regular sight in Trolley Square on Friday and Saturday nights into the wee hours. (Baby steps, people.)
Read more - https://www.delawareonline.com/story...ons/502478002/

I really liked and agreed with some of the suggestions they mentioned for Wilmington!
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  #2571  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2018, 3:26 PM
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Originally Posted by jonesrmj View Post
What else does Wilmington need to be more fun? We have (more) suggestions.



Read more - https://www.delawareonline.com/story...ons/502478002/

I really liked and agreed with some of the suggestions they mentioned for Wilmington!
This is good.
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  #2572  
Old Posted Apr 14, 2018, 7:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnIII View Post
I remember when I was a kid there was the Diamond line; it went south of Wilmington but its no longer used. One time we ended up farther then where we wanted to be and had to turn back so we could get back to Churchman's Crossing.

I was thinking it they modernized the Diamond Line they could probably extend commuter or regional rail service right down the Delmarva Peninsula; I should drive down there; the tracks may be still there. If I remember right it ran south of the Northeast Corridor; all we have to do is modernize the rail bed I'm thinking.

All I can tell you is that the metro line was called the Blue Diamond Line; it ran from Wilmington south to Seaford, Delaware; but I can't remember what it cost to ride it back then or if it stopped in Seaford, Delaware or kept going south. If the tracks or rail bed is still there it may be an option.

I also heard that before my time there was a coastal passage line that when to places like Delaware City or something like that but I don't remember about that; some of my cousins are in their 80's and 90's and they talked about that.

A commuter line is a good idea into Philly from areas south of Middletown, as you said the commute along I95 is a nightmare..... though it would only serve as a logical commuter alternative into/out of philly and into/out of philly alone, luckily DE doesn't deal with the same traffic nightmares that PA along I95 Chester and into Philly does at rush hour (anyone who has driven this knows what a disaster it is to get into the city at those times) In Delaware it is still much quicker to drive from one section to another, Wilmington is arguably the worst and even that is a walk in the park compared to commuting into Philly.

One thing that would be a huge improvement would be the speed which the trains travel at. If you're ever on I495, you always out pace SEPTA trains while driving, and AMTRAK (not even ACELA) blows by them constantly.

Think about it, Middletown DE is 59 miles to downtown Philly. If you could travel at 120 miles an hour (like Amtrak trains are designed to do, despite us lacking the proper infrastructure for them to maintain those speeds outside a few stretches of the NE Corridor) an express line could arrive in under 45 minutes to center city.

Newark DE station has tracks which connect to Middletown, though they'd likely require expensive improvement. In fact, if you go exploring on google maps, there are tracks in place which connect the beach area in Sussex County all the way to Philly..... again though, you would have to make trains move much faster to incentivize people to take transit rather than drive.
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  #2573  
Old Posted Apr 14, 2018, 7:54 PM
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[IMG][/IMG]

On a side slightly related note to the Wilmington needs more fun things topic. I'd argue Wilmington needs safety first, as a male I would feel okay living in the riverfront/marketstreet area of Wilmington alone, but with a wife/girlfriend I would always be worried to let them walk around alone, espeically at night. Wilmington needs to improve safety and lower crime in the city.

Above I got bored and set up a development plan that will never happen, however the theory is if you could redevelop the area with red stripes (which is not that many blocks when you really break it down) the entire section is on a peninsula and bordered by market street/down town. So if you got good development, and expanded the riverfront to the green stripes you would have an large section downtown thats insulted and could attract new, hip and safer living to encourage more people to move into Wilmington. Then you could start pushing redevelopment further into the west side once the east was built up.

Then if you want to get crazy, you could expand into the remaining tip of the peninsula and develop the whole section into an additional expansion of the riverfront with apartments/condos/shops and restaurants.
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  #2574  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2018, 2:56 AM
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Interesting plan. I like the idea of extending the river walk that direction, but it would be a huge project. I’ve always though the west side of downtown would be a little easier to improve because (1) it’s already getting some residential development nearby (market street, midtown park), and (2) it’s closer and more easily connected to established and decent neighborhoods. On the east side, it seems a little more disconnected from downtown/other neighborhoods and thus the poverty and crime seems more entrenched and harder to redevelop. But I’m still new and could be wrong on that assumption.
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  #2575  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2018, 8:02 PM
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Westrum proposes apartment project in Bala Cynwyd

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Westrum Development Co. is proposing to develop an apartment complex on the site of 9 Presidential Blvd., which is a vacant office building in Bala Cynwyd.

The plans filed with Lower Merion have the developer razing the existing structure to make way for a four-story building that would have 173 apartments and two retail spaces, one totaling 2,205 square feet and another totaling 4,804 square feet. The two-story, 27,000-square-foot building at 9 Presidential is owned by Brandywine Realty Trust and had for sometime been marketed as a potential office development site.
More: https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...la-cynwyd.html
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  #2576  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2018, 8:12 AM
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A Pennsylvania Town's Freight Station Is on the Fast Track to Preservation

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Lansdale, Pennsylvania, a small town situated 28 miles north of Philadelphia, is home to two historic train stations. One is the beloved Lansdale passenger station, a brick building constructed in 1903. Passengers flow through it like water; it remains one of the busiest commuter stations in Philadelphia’s transportation system. Because of its high visibility, there were few complaints when it came time for repairs in 1999. The station’s rotted roof was replaced and its windows and doors were patched up, leaving it looking like its early-20th century self.

But less than two blocks away lies its counterpart, a stone freight station that Bill Henning, vice president of the nonprofit Discover Lansdale, calls “the ignored stepchild” of the pair. Also built in 1903, the freight station spent decades as Lansdale’s commercial heart before falling vacant for over 20 years.
Quote:
It remained that way until 2016, when the station came to the attention of Bill Henning and Discover Lansdale. The nonprofit, which works to promote events and businesses in town, recognized the significance of the station to Lansdale’s history, and saw the need for a multipurpose space and visitor’s center. They convinced the borough parking authority to purchase the station and its surrounding land, and then sell the structure to Discover Lansdale for $60,000. (The parking authority only wanted the space to create a new lot).

To Henning’s surprise, a survey determined that much of the structure was in remarkably good shape—the stone walls and roof had endured for a century with minimal damage. But the floor joists underneath the freight doors had rotted from rain and snow, rendering them unstable. In addition, electricity and plumbing needed to be installed before the building could open to the public. All told, the rehabilitation project was estimated to cost $250,000.

Discover Lansdale has raised around $70,000 thus far through private donations and by selling the station’s original yellow pine flooring (which needed to be removed to repair the joists underneath) to people looking for quality wood to build benches and bookcases out of. But equally beneficial to the bottom line has been the support of the community. The project’s engineer and electrician have provided work for free or at discounted rates, a local tavern raised $5,000 for the rehabilitation by hosting a beer garden in the station’s parking lot for two summers, and Lansdale residents have come out in droves for the clean-up days that Discover Lansdale has organized.

“It’s been amazing how many people have been coming out to swing a hammer, or pull weeds, or pry up nails,” Henning says. “I think a lot of it is because they like what [the rehabilitated station’s] purpose will be.”
https://savingplaces.org/stories/a-p...n#.WtWqc39rzcs
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  #2577  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2018, 12:43 PM
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Wilmington - 76ers Fieldhouse

'Riverfront Development Corporation wants county land brought into city limits'



"The Riverfront Development Corporation wants Wilmington to annex and rezone land from New Castle County to facilitate plans for the proposed 76ers Fieldhouse and other Riverfront attractions." ...

https://www.delawareonline.com/story...its/514971002/
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  #2578  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2018, 12:14 AM
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Hard Rock A.C. to announce grand opening and entertainment lineup Wednesday

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Executives from the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Atlantic City will officially announce the resort’s grand opening date and entertainment lineup at a press conference on Wednesday.

The press conference, set to begin at 11 a.m., will take place in the Tanger Outlets at 101 N. Michigan Avenue. There will also be simultaneous press conferences announcing the resort’s grand opening date in Philadelphia and New York City, according to a statement from the company.
http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/n...a65405a15.html
(^Gallery of construction progress in the link)
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  #2579  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2018, 12:18 AM
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Tropicana Atlantic City to remain open after $1.85 billion sale

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ATLANTIC CITY — Billionaire hedge-fund manager Carl Icahn has sold his second Atlantic City casino property in as many years, announcing Monday the sale of Tropicana Casino and Resort as part of a $1.85 billion deal for seven Tropicana properties with Eldorado Resorts Inc. and Gaming and Leisure Properties Inc.

Tropicana Entertainment Inc. agreed to sell its real estate holdings to Gaming and Leisure Properties for $1.21 billion and merge its gaming and hotel operations into Eldorado Resorts, which will lease the sold properties for $640 million.

"The acquisition of seven Tropicana Entertainment properties will allow Eldorado to enter two new gaming jurisdictions and deliver additional financial and geographic diversity to our operating base," said Eldorado Resorts Chairman and CEO Gary Carano.
http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/n...17c0f12db.html
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  #2580  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2018, 12:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Slyfox View Post
A commuter line is a good idea into Philly from areas south of Middletown, as you said the commute along I95 is a nightmare..... though it would only serve as a logical commuter alternative into/out of philly and into/out of philly alone, luckily DE doesn't deal with the same traffic nightmares that PA along I95 Chester and into Philly does at rush hour (anyone who has driven this knows what a disaster it is to get into the city at those times) In Delaware it is still much quicker to drive from one section to another, Wilmington is arguably the worst and even that is a walk in the park compared to commuting into Philly.

One thing that would be a huge improvement would be the speed which the trains travel at. If you're ever on I495, you always out pace SEPTA trains while driving, and AMTRAK (not even ACELA) blows by them constantly.

Think about it, Middletown DE is 59 miles to downtown Philly. If you could travel at 120 miles an hour (like Amtrak trains are designed to do, despite us lacking the proper infrastructure for them to maintain those speeds outside a few stretches of the NE Corridor) an express line could arrive in under 45 minutes to center city.

Newark DE station has tracks which connect to Middletown, though they'd likely require expensive improvement. In fact, if you go exploring on google maps, there are tracks in place which connect the beach area in Sussex County all the way to Philly..... again though, you would have to make trains move much faster to incentivize people to take transit rather than drive.
Middletown makes complete and total sense as a commuter rail terminus. It's a pretty solid town with a strong historic core, there's a need for commuter rail to Center City from central Delaware, and the rail infrastructure ends up working out well for a line separate from the NEC -- I suggest a route following existing, active lines from Middletown to New Castle and then past the freight yard in Wilmington before merging with the NEC, perhaps using that large and partially-disused flying junction complex northeast of the city.

One issue about passenger rail to southern Delaware, though, is that the destinations don't all lie along the same line. The primary route down the Delmarva Peninsula runs through the western Delaware interior towards Salisbury and Pocomoke City, MD, and eventually Cape Charles, VA. Access to Lewes and OCMD, despite their proximity, occurs along completely separate branch lines. There is an alignment nearly all the way from OCMD to Chesapeake Bay down in MD, but it's largely disused and probably abandoned entirely ... but the present of that alignment in and of itself suggests that a rail route from Balt/Wash to OCMD is possible without needing to make a completely greenfield alignment.

So there are opportunities for rail infrastructure on the Delmarva Peninsula but significant challenges, and the biggest challenge is that the available alignment down the peninsula doesn't really do a very good job of hitting the main development corridor from Lewes and Rehoboth down through OCMD at all.
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